Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


What Do WOF Plans Mean For Already Stretched Police?

Kris
FAAFOI
Police Spokesperson

28 January 2013 MEDIA STATEMENT

What Do WOF Plans Mean For Already Stretched Police?

Kiwis deserve an explanation as to what exactly the Government expects our front-line police to be checking on the roadside as a result of National’s changes to the WOF regime, Labour’s Police spokesman Kris Faafoi said today.

“In a rare move the Government has loosened the purse strings to allow between $2.5 and $5 million in additional funding for police to implement the new regime. But without details of the frequency and extent of checks police will have to perform it is hard to measure the true impact this will have on the front-line.

“It also raises questions about Police Minister Anne Tolley’s priorities. Is implementing a new WOF system really the best use of police time and resources?

“I think Kiwis want to see police spending most of their time preventing and fighting crime, not checking indicator lights, wiper blades and tyre treads,” Kris Faafoi said.

“Safety is paramount on our roads, but police have enough on their hands as it is.

“The Minister needs to give details about what our police officers will be required to do. Will they be expected to have a standard check of all vehicles they pull over to ensure they’re safe? If so, that’s time, training and money – and a few million won’t go far,” Kris Faafoi said.

labour.org.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Election Day: Make Sure You're A Part Of It!

Saturday 20 September, is election day, and New Zealanders’ last chance to have a say on who leads the country for the next three years.

“The people and parties we elect tomorrow will be making the decisions that affect us, our families and our communities,” says Robert Peden, Chief Electoral Officer. “It doesn’t get much more important than that, and we need all New Zealanders to use their voice and vote.”

Voting places will be open from 9.00am until 7.00pm on election day. The busiest time at voting places is usually 9.00am - 11.00am.

“Take your EasyVote card with you when you go to vote, as it will make voting faster and easier, and vote close to home if you can. But don’t worry if you forget your card, or didn’t receive one, because as long as you are enrolled to vote, your voice will be heard,” says Mr Peden. More>>

 

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news