Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Denial doesn’t make child poverty go away

Jacinda Ardern
Social Development Spokesperson
Spokesperson for Children

30 January 2013

Denial doesn’t make child poverty go away

The Government doesn’t just have a blind spot when it comes to child poverty, it has a major case of denial, Labour’s Social Development spokesperson and Spokesperson for Children, Jacinda Ardern says.

“John Key, the same man who said he was ‘deeply concerned’ about the scale of child poverty, is now trying to dismiss its impact by linking it to a few ‘isolated examples’ of children going to school hungry.

“That shows just how out of touch he is. Charities currently feed close to 40,000 children through food programmes in schools, while estimates put the number of kids going hungry far higher.

“These are often kids who are also missing out on the experiences most of us regard as part of growing up in New Zealand, kids who are missing out on the basics like warm clothing in winter.

“Child poverty is hardly a hidden problem, nor is it small. The Children’s Commissioner is well aware of it, social agencies know it’s an issue, yet the Prime Minister continues to deny it.

“Just yesterday we had a local charity group launching a dollar-a-day campaign - similar to ones they run to help kids in Third World countries – for Kiwi kids in need.

“Mr Key might be content to brush off the arrival of a campaign usually only found in Third World countries as being nothing to worry about, as he does with anything else to do with child poverty. I’m not, and nor is Labour.

“Any level of child poverty is unacceptable. It's time for some leadership that not only acknowledges the problem, but acts to address the causes.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Election Day: Make Sure You're A Part Of It!

Saturday 20 September, is election day, and New Zealanders’ last chance to have a say on who leads the country for the next three years.

“The people and parties we elect tomorrow will be making the decisions that affect us, our families and our communities,” says Robert Peden, Chief Electoral Officer. “It doesn’t get much more important than that, and we need all New Zealanders to use their voice and vote.”

Voting places will be open from 9.00am until 7.00pm on election day. The busiest time at voting places is usually 9.00am - 11.00am.

“Take your EasyVote card with you when you go to vote, as it will make voting faster and easier, and vote close to home if you can. But don’t worry if you forget your card, or didn’t receive one, because as long as you are enrolled to vote, your voice will be heard,” says Mr Peden. More>>

 

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news