Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Collins Comments April 5


Collins Comments

I remember a time, not that long ago, when the internet was rarely talked about, mobile phones were the size of small bricks and a tweet was the sound birds made.

Today the rapid growth of new technologies and communication channels such as text messaging, Facebook and Twitter means we now have access to information at our fingertips and are able contact each other, anytime, anywhere.

Unfortunately it also means that bullying can occur anytime, anywhere. Bullying is no longer confined to the classroom or playground as tormenters can harass their targets 24 hours a day, seven days a week, wherever they go, and the trail of abuse lives on in cyberspace, following victims for years.

This week I announced a raft of new proposals to protect victims of cyber bullying and hold perpetrators to account including:

• Creating a new civil enforcement regime that includes setting up or appointing an approved agency as the first port of call for complaints.
• Allowing people to take serious complaints to the District Court, which will be able to issue sanctions such as take-down orders and cease-and-desist notices.
• Making it an offence to send messages and post material online that is grossly offensive, indecent, obscene, menacing or knowingly false, punishable by up to 3 months imprisonment or a $2,000 fine.
• Creating a new offence of incitement to commit suicide, even in situations when a person does not attempt to take their own life, punishable by up to 3 years imprisonment.
Amending the Harassment, Privacy and Human Rights Acts to ensure they are up-to-date for digital communications. In some cases, existing laws were written before cell phones, instant messaging devices and social networking websites became common communication channels.
These new measures send a clear message to cyber bullies: Time’s up. Your behaviour is not acceptable.

I’m sure I speak on behalf of many New Zealanders when I share my concerns about the devastating effects cyber bullying has, particularly on our young people.

No one should ever be subject to this kind of cowardly attack and now with the right support and modern laws in place, victims will no longer have to suffer.


Hon Judith Collins
MP for Papakura

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The National Leadership “Contest”

Key’s endorsement of English has turned this “contest” into a race for second place.

This succession was well planned. Lets not forget that English was told by Key in September of his intention to resign, and English was the only member of Cabinet entrusted with that information before it was sprung on everyone else on Monday morning. More>>

ALSO:

 
 

International Rankings: Student Results 'Show More Resourcing Needed'

NZEI: New Zealand had only held relatively steady in international rankings in some areas because the average achievement for several other OECD countries had lowered the OECD average -- not because our student achievement has improved. More>>

ALSO:

Earlier:

Salvation Army Report: Beyond The Prison Gate Report

A new Salvation Army report says changes must be made to how prisoners re-enter society for New Zealanders to feel safe and secure in their homes and communities. More>>

ALSO:

Surprise Exit: Gordon Campbell On The Key Resignation

The resignation of John Key is one thing. The way that Key and his deputy Bill English have screwed the scrum on the leadership succession vote (due on December 12) is something else again. It remains to be seen whether the party caucus – ie, the ambitious likes of Steven Joyce, Judith Collins, Paula Bennett, and Amy Adams – will simply roll over... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news