Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Disaster averted for state sector workers

David Cunliffe
Associate Finance Spokesperson

23 May 2013

Disaster averted for state sector workers

Changes forced to the State Sector and Public Finance Reform Bill (SSPFRB) by Labour and the state sector unions have averted disaster for government workers who were set to lose their redundancy entitlements and employment rights, Labour’s Associate Finance Spokesperson David Cunliffe said.

Amendments agreed by Parliament’s Finance and Expenditure Select Committee to the SSPFRB were tabled in the House today.

The Bill has been heavily amended in response to strong submissions from state sector employees themselves and their representatives.

“Tough negotiations at FEC have resulted in a much better Bill, where employees’ rights are now better protected than they would have been,” David Cunliffe said.

“Redundancy provisions have been improved so that state sector employees retain their entitlements unless accepting a position that is ‘no less favourable’ than their existing package.

“Transition arrangements have been improved so that collective agreements and individual agreements are sunsetted equally, three years after the Bill takes effect.

“Government workforce policy statements have been revised to ensure that all existing legal and bargaining rights have been protected.

“Conflict of interest protections; enhanced governance for delegated powers; and strengthened accountability requirements in public sector financial reporting have all been achieved through the committee’s deliberations.

“Although Labour still has significant concerns over some aspects of the Bill, the amendments achieved in Committee, with the support of unions, mean Labour will now support the passage of the Bill,” David Cunliffe said.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Earth Day: Global March To Defend Science In NZ Saturday

The March for Science movement emerged in the immediate wake of President Trump’s inauguration as he moved quickly to curtail the power of the Environmental Protection Agency and limit the ability of government agencies to communicate scientific evidence.

Since then it has broadened to “champion robustly funded and publicly communicated science as a pillar of human freedom and prosperity”. More>>

'Opening The Election' Video: Nicky Hager And Mike Joy On Science, Spin, And Society

In two videos relevant to the March for Science from Scoop's 'Opening The Election' forum, Massey University's Dr Mike Joy spoke about promoting science in the face of government spin and journalist Nicky Hager offered a checklist of issues to promote for an open civil society. More>>

 

Health Workers Respond: People's Mental Health Report Released

The People's Mental Health Review reinforces a recent YesWeCare.nz survey of 6,000 health workers, which found nine in 10 believe they don't have the staff or resources to deliver the care Kiwis need when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

More Mental Health:


Energy: Greens Launch Plan For Cheaper And Cleaner Electricity

$112 million for winter warm-up payments to help low-income households cover their power bills • setting a goal for 100 percent renewable electricity by 2030 (in average hydrological conditions) • an investigation into the electricity wholesale market. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Aged-Care Settlement

Until yesterday, a National government has always been the sworn enemy of women seeking justice in the workplace, in the face of gender-based pay discrimination. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news