Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Ikaroa Rawhiti Maori Regional Housing Forum - Speech


Hon Tariana Turia

Associate Minister of Housing



Friday 24 May 2013


Ikaroa Rawhiti Maori Regional Housing Forum - Speech

Ikaroa Rawhiti Maori Regional Housing Forum & Te Matapihi He Tirohanga Mo Te iwi Maori Housing Hui , Te Wananga o Aotearoa, Gisborne

E nga iwi o Ikaroa Rawhiti ara ko Ngati Porou, ko Te Aitanga a Mahaki, ko Rongowhakaata, ko Ngai Tamanuhiri, ko Ngati Kahungunu, koutou katoa kua tae mai ki tenei huihuinga e pa ana ki nga take whai whare noho, tena ra koutou katoa.

Thank you for inviting me to speak here today at your forum. I want to acknowledge Tiopira Rauna and to commend you for the significant role that the Ikaroa Rawhiti Maori Housing Forum has played over the last seven years, in supporting Māori housing in this role.

More recently, over the last two years, Te Matapihi He Tirohanga Mo te Iwi Trust has been formed to advocate and promote Maori social housing. We are at a critical point in our history, where it is vital that Maori capability is called upon to develop affordable housing for Maori. I see hui like this as important in bringing together the key stakeholders – whanau, hapu and iwi; Maori developers and Maori housing providers including Māori social housing providers.

Good quality housing is vital for the future development of our whanau. It is key to our overall health and wellbeing. And it is essential for Whanau Ora. Where you live, how you live and who you live with – impacts heavily on who we become, what we do, and the quality of our lives.

The kaupapa for this hui is ‘what are the barriers to Maori housing in the Ikaroa Rawhiti electorate’. First and foremost, we have to recognise the significance of sufficient family income and how that can act as a constraint.

Across Ikaroa Rāwhiti the median family income is $44,900 – some $14,000 less than the median family income for New Zealand as a whole.

That has important implications when it comes to tenure of dwelling – 41.8% of your whanau are paying rent – compared to nationwide just 26.7%.

I’ve never been one for statistics – but these figures certainly create a context for our hui today – in terms of outlining the scope of the challenge to own your own home.

It hasn’t always been like that - In 2004, housing affordability was similar for Maori, European, and Pasifika households for the first time. That’s only a decade ago – and so I think it helps to provide us with the hope that we once again be homeowners and mortgage free – if we so choose.

There is one other key aspect of housing barriers that I want to touch on and that is the challenge of healthy homes.

You might have seen in last week’s Budget our announcement of an additional $20 million towards preventing rheumatic fever, on top of the $24million we negotiated in the previous years.

Why is it important to think about this at a housing hui? Well, the risks for families living in sub-standard housing are huge and are taking a toll on their health. Children who live in damp, cold over-crowded homes are at risk of third world diseases like rheumatic fever. This can have long lasting devastating results and the need to take antibiotics for at least ten years of their lives. Maori and Pasifika people suffer at a disproportionate rate of rheumatic fever compared to other groups. This long term damage is such a huge price to pay.

Warm, dry affordable housing is essential for good health but housing is more than just a roof over our heads. Our homes are where our whanau gather, it is a place where we foster our happy memories. It is a place to retreat from the hustle and bustle of our working lives - a haven of peace in our busy lives. It is the place where sometimes our babies are born and often it becomes a place where our loved ones lie before their final journey.

Our early wisdom often connected the waka, the house and the human life as the three treasured possessions of our tupuna.

According to Sir Kingi Ihaka “he matua waka e taea te raupine mai; he matua whare e taea te ropiropi e te ringaringa; he matua tangata, ki te mate ana, e kaore rawa e taea te raupine mai e te ringaringa”.

In other words – while a canoe can be repaired and a house can be fashioned by hand, if a person dies no human hand can bring it back to life.

And so in coming to this hui today, I have been thinking about the solutions that we can build, to help restore and give life to all our whanau – housing solutions alongside of initiatives to bring warmth and security to our homes.

As the Associate Minister of Housing, I am excited by the housing projects undertaken by iwi organisations in conjunction with Putea Maori from the Ministry of Business Innovation and Employment. This fund is enabling housing development on multiply-owned Maori land.

The putea was first launched in October 2011 and $8m in grant funding was allocated to Maori organisations in Northland, Bay of Plenty, Hamilton, Gisborne and Hawkes Bay. From that initial allocation, Te Runanga o Ngati Porou received $300,000 towards building three homes.

Putea Maori can provide 75 percent of the total project cost including construction and site work when building on multiply owned Maori land.

I want to use the opportunity of this day, to announce over three million dollars of investment has been released from the Putea Maori Grant for social housing development.

The putea has been allocated to three organisations specialising in housing for kaumatua and for housing development on papakainga – Mangatawa; a Māori Incorporation in the Bay of Plenty, Te Runanga o Kirikiriroa Trust in Hamilton and Unaiki Memorial Trust who are utilising innovative technology with the support of Auckland University and He Korowai Trust to build three new homes for whanau in need.

I’m hoping that next time I return to this rohe, I will be announcing similar investments in initiatives championed by the Ikaroa Rāwhiti regional Māori housing forum!

There has been some other good developments in Maori housing. Recently I announced that $12m over four years will be made available to Maori organisations like Maori land trusts and other collectives.

This funding under the Kainga Whenua Infrastructure scheme is to assist with the infrastructure work required for new greenfields development on ancestral land.

There have also been changes to the Kainga Whenua scheme which have opened the way for Maori who own homes or have mortgaged homes to apply under this scheme to build on their tribal land.

Te Puni Kokiri’s Special Housing Action Zones programme targets the serous housing needs amongst whanau, hapu and iwi. This programme target communities and is a partnership between crown agencies and the hapu, iwi or community group.

This programme has made significant advances in developing housing solutions on Maori land by trialling different approaches like in the case of the Western Bay of Plenty model – as well as the development of tools ‘Te Keteparaha mo nga papakainga’.

I am pleased to announce that the Papakainga Toolkit initiative is working with four regions – including Tairawhiti – to help facilitate housing aspirations on Māori land. I look forward to hearing how it progresses.

The significance of our connections to our lands cannot be under estimated. But the reality is, is that economic circumstances have kept many of us from building on our ancestor’s lands. I am excited that these changes to these loans schemes and other initiatives will allow Maori to consider the options for reconnecting with their whenua. Noho ora mai ra.

ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Aftermath Of The Greenwald/Snowden Revelations

The credibility issues have come down to two main ones:

1 The email This has to do with whether Key knowingly agreed to use our immigration rules as a tool to ensnare and ultimately extradite Kim Dotcom, and do so largely at the behest of Hollywood’s leading corporates and their best friend in the White House, vice-President Joseph Biden. Some of the debate in the last few days has turned on the reliability of a Warners email that seems to set out this plan in black and white. IMO, the email is just the icing on the cake...

2. Mass surveillance Earlier to day I was going to try to explain the difference between what Edward Snowden/Glenn Greenwald were talking about (ie mass surveillance via the the cable-accessing SPEARGUN programme and the Xkeyscore analytical programme) and what Key has chosen to talk about instead in order to deliberately distract and confuse the public. Then I found that Keith Ng had not only beaten me to it, but had done so with beautiful lucidity. More>>

Out-Link - "Project SPEARGUN underway" • OnPoint • Public Address

Statement From The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security

“I am only able to comment on specific GCSB activities through my annual and inquiry reports. However, I can advise that I have not identified any indiscriminate interception of New Zealanders’ data in my work to date. I will continue to monitor these issues.” More>>

 
 

Parliament Today:

Pre-Election Chartering: Four New Partnership Schools To Open

Education Minister Hekia Parata today announced the Government has signed contracts to open four new Partnership Schools in 2015. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf 50 Out Now - The Election Issue: Loss Leaders

Gordon Campbell: A third term requires a mature decision, with eyes wide open. It calls for a conscious vote of confidence… Without trying hard here are about 19 reasons, in no particular order, for not ticking ‘party vote’ National. More>>

ALSO:

Not-Especially New Plans: All Prisons To Become Working Prisons Under National

All public prisons in New Zealand will become full working prisons by 2017, and ex-prisoners will receive post-release drug addiction treatment if National is returned to government, says Corrections Spokesperson Anne Tolley. More>>

ALSO:

Māngere: "False Claim Of Matai Title" - Labour

National must explain why its candidate for Māngere Misa Fia Turner appears to be using a Matai title she is not entitled to, Labour’s MP for Māngere and Pacific Islands Affairs spokesperson Su’a William Sio says. A Matai title is a legally-recognised ... More>>

ALSO:

CPAG Report: No New Zealand Child Should Grow Up In Poverty

Child Poverty Action Group's flagship policy publication Our Children, Our Choice: Priorities for Policy calls for cross party political agreement to underpin an action plan to eliminate child poverty in New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell:
On National’s Phantom Tax Cut Package

Hmmm. So National’s tax cuts package turns out to be one of those television advertisements that screams a headline promise – perfect skin! a youth tonic that works! – while in very small print there’s an out clause: special conditions may apply. More>>

ALSO:

Water: New Marine Reserves On West Coast Opened

Five new marine reserves were officially opened by Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith on the West Coast of the South Island to protect a range of marine ecosystems for conservation, science and recreation. More>>

ALSO:

Perception: Study Looks At Trustworthiness And Support Of Politicians

A University of Canterbury marketing study has looked at what impact the Thatcher Effect has on perceptions of trustworthiness and liking of New Zealand politicians leading up to the 2014 general election. More>>

ALSO:

History Lessons: Jamie Whyte At ACT Campaign Opening

It is nearly 20 years since the ACT party was born. Many people no longer remember why it was named ACT. They may imagine that it was on account of our determination to actually do things in parliament rather than simply occupy the seats and collect the salaries. That’s true but it isn’t the right answer... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news