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Global Education Ministers arrive for Summit

Global Education Ministers arrive for Summit


Ministers of Education from the top performing education systems around the world have started arriving in New Zealand to attend the 4th International Summit on the Teaching Profession (Summit), which starts tomorrow.

Education Minister Hekia Parata says, “It is a credit to the quality of our education system that these international ministers are coming. This is the ‘world cup’ of education and our bid to host this prestigious summit was well received, and is being well supported.”

Education Ministers, heads of teacher unions and teacher leaders from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) highest achieving countries around the globe will gather in Wellington on 28-29 March.

The confirmed Minister-led delegations are:

· Canada Hon Jeff Johnson
Hon Alan McIsaac

· China, Hong Kong Hon Eddie Ng Hak-kim

· Denmark Hon Christine Antorini

· Estonia Dr Jaak Aaviksoo

· Finland Hon Krista Kiuru

· Germany Secretary-General of the Standing Conference,
Mr Udo Michallik

· Japan Vice Minister Shinichi Yamanaka

· Netherlands Dr Jet Bussmaker

· Poland Undersecretary of State Ewa Dudek

· Singapore Senior Minister of State Indranee Rajah

· Sweden State Secretary Bertil Östberg

· UK Minister Michael Russell

· USA Secretary Arne Duncan

· Vietnam Vice Minister Dr Hien Nguyen

“As host for the Summit, I have taken the opportunity to strengthen our regional education links by including, as honoured guests and observers, our Pacific education ministers as we all look to raising Pasifika student achievement whether here in New Zealand or in our neighbouring Pacific nations,” Ms Parata says.

The Summit is jointly hosted by the Education Minister of the host country, the OECD and Education International and is focused on strengthening the teaching profession and raising student achievement.

This year, the Summit theme is ‘Excellence, equity and inclusiveness – high quality teaching for all’.

“The Summit is a great opportunity for the top performing education systems to share their successes and their challenges, and learn from each other. I am delighted that Ministers from around the world have prioritised this summit,” Ms Parata says.

“Hosting the Summit is a part of our Government’s comprehensive quality teaching agenda, and the theme reflects the longstanding challenge our system has of raising even higher the achievement of our best and brightest students, while also lifting those who are being left behind.

“Other elements of our comprehensive quality teaching agenda include:

· the establishment of the new professional body, the Education Council of Aotearoa New Zealand (EDUCANZ), which replaces the NZ Teachers Council and is the cornerstone of the quality teaching agenda

· the announcement by the Prime Minister of the $359 million investment in professional career pathways over the next four years that will support teachers and principals to lift student achievement in every school

· the inaugural Prime Minister’s Education Excellence Awards in June

· the education festivals in Auckland, Wellington and Christchurch to coincide with the Summit

· and the new post graduate qualifications being offered from this year.

“This National-led Government has an unrelenting focus on giving all our young people a better education. It is important that we publicly acknowledge the powerful contribution the teaching profession makes to lifting overall student achievement.”
Ends

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