Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Waitangi National Trust Amendment Bill First Reading Speech

Waitangi National Trust Amendment Bill First Reading Speech

“Waitangi is the birthplace of our Nation.
Waitangi is a place that belongs to all New Zealanders, Pākehā and Māori”

Incredibly, these words were spoken 80-years-ago by a British Lord – who’d been born the same year British troops invaded Waikato Tainui.

Lord Charles Bathurst Bledisloe, New Zealand’s fourth Governor General, was a visionary, a man whose thinking was years ahead of his time.

A man whose words of generosity matched his actions.

When public servant salaries were cut during the Great Depression, Lord Bledisloe insisted Government reduce his own salary by the same proportion. It meant he ended up using his own private income to carry out his duties and to leave an enduring mark upon New Zealand history.

In 1931, he donated the Bledisloe Cup to mark the annual rugby test between Australia and New Zealand: the Bledisloe remains physically, the largest cup in world rugby.

In 1933, after working alongside Sir Apirana Ngata, Lord Bledisloe donated the Ahuwhenua Māori Farmer of the Year Trophy – the Ahuwhenua remains New Zealand’s oldest, national farming competition.

However Lord Bledisloe’s most significant gift to the nation was made in 1932 when he used his own money and purchased the Waitangi estate from private vendors.
He then gifted all one thousand acres to the nation, and said:

“Waitangi is the birthplace of our Nation.
Waitangi is a place that belongs to all New Zealanders, Pākehā and Māori.”

More than eighty years later Lord Bledisloe’s words resound through the generations.
They are as relevant today as they were in 1932.

Mr Speaker, this bill is about nation building and it has been a great honour to have served as a member of the Waitangi National Trust. Those who have served before me include representatives of some of the forefathers of Aotearoa New Zealand: Hone Heke, Maihi Kawiti, Tamati Waka Nene, Pōmare, James Busby, Archdeacon Harry Williams, Edward Gibbon Wakefield. Those of us who are privileged to serve on the trust today; we have very large shoes to fill.

This bill strengthens the existing Trust by making the Governor General its honorary patron.

It extends the membership with two additional Members of Parliament who are not members of Cabinet.

The Crown Representatives Group will provide for an enduring relationship between the Crown and the Waitangi National Trust. It will be made up of the Prime Minister, the Minister for Māori Affairs and the Minister for Arts, Culture and Heritage.

Mr Speaker, this legislative “makeover” for the Waitangi National Trust is being matched on the ground with plans for a state of the art Waitangi Museum.
The plans are outstanding and in keeping with the trust’s vision for Waitangi to be a place for all new Zealanders.

A place central to our history as a nation.
A place central to our growth as a nation.
A place of honour, partnership, scholarship and courage.
A place all Kiwis want to visit at least once in their lifetime.

Mr Speaker, next year Aotearoa New Zealand turns 175-years-old.
This bill is about succession planning, future proofing our most significant national site.
The signing of the Treaty of Waitangi marked the birth of our nation.
The lands at Waitangi mark the birthplace of our nation.
The Treaty of Waitangi itself is the birth certificate of our nation.
I am pleased to stand in support of this Bill.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On Gaza And Burning The Israeli Flag

One of the selling points in New Zealand’s campaign for a temporary seat on the Security Council is that we have a pluckily independent voice to offer on international conflicts.

This image is not entirely self-delusional. When we did occupy a temporary UN Security Council seat in the 1990s, New Zealand was forthright about the need for the international community to actively respond to the Rwanda genocide. On April 14, 1994, New Zealand, Nigeria and the Czech Republic were the only nations to call for a forceful UN intervention to halt the killings. It was a proud moment in the diplomatic record of the Bolger government.

What then, is the current National government doing with respect to the slaughter in Gaza? More>>

 

Parliament Today:

TAIC Report: Urgent Recommendations After Melling Rail Accident

The Transport Accident Investigation Commission has made four urgent recommendations to KiwiRail following the accident two months ago (27 May) when a Matangi passenger train collided with a stop block at Melling Station, Lower Hutt. More>>

ALSO:

Red Tape: Local Regulations Go Under Microscope

The Government says it is accepting nearly all of the recommendations the Productivity Commission has made on ways to improve local regulations. More>>

ALSO:

Spending Questions: Claudette Hauiti To Step Aside At Election

National Party President Peter Goodfellow confirms that he has received notification from List MP Claudette Hauiti that she plans to step aside at the 20 September election. More>>

ALSO:

EPA: Board Of Inquiry Rejects Basin Flyover By Majority Of 3 To 1

The independent Board of Inquiry delegated to decide on the Basin Bridge Proposal has, by a majority decision (3 to 1), cancelled the Transport Agency’s Notice of Requirement and declined its resource consent applications for the construction, operation and maintenance of a flyover on State Highway 1 in Wellington City... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Non-Apology To Tania Billingsley

The refusal by Prime Minister John Key to issue a personal apology to Tania Billingsley has been accompanied by an array of excuses... Yesterday though, Key’s choice of words indicated that an apology was the last thing on his mind. More>>

ALSO:

Conventions: Winston Peters On The Nation

Winston Peters opens door to standing in East Coast Bays electorate, says it's an "exciting point" and he's thinking about it. "I’ve had a whole lot of people writing to me and calling up and saying ‘why don’t you have a go in East Coast Bays’." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news