Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Goodhew: 2014 Heart Foundation Forum

Jo Goodhew

14 APRIL, 2014

Speech: 2014 Heart Foundation Forum

E aku rangatira, tēnā koutou katoa. Ka nui te honore ki te mihi ki a koutou.

Good morning, it is my pleasure to be able to open the 2014 Heart Foundation Forum.

Thank you Tony for your warm welcome.

I acknowledge the life members, board members and delegates.

I would also like to acknowledge this morning’s other speakers Prof Phil Baker, Chair of Gravida and Professor of Maternal and Foetal Health at the University of Auckland, and Dr Debbie Ryan, Director of Pacific Perspectives.

I congratulate the Heart Foundation for bringing together the Heart Foundation community both volunteers and paid staff under one roof.

The Heart Foundation has a significant volunteer workforce whose work is integral to the achievements of the Foundation.

We have come a long way in reducing the burden of heart disease in New Zealand.

I am here today to acknowledge the contribution the Heart Foundation has made in this journey and the work we still have to do.

When we tackle diseases such as heart disease we need a three pronged approach consisting of prevention, early detection and effective treatment.

We also need a co-ordinated effort across different agencies and settings.

The Foundation’s Stop the Heartbreak document is a very useful input into this and I am pleased to note that the Government is already making progress on many of the actions identified.

Although the mortality rate from cardiovascular disease has halved over the last twenty years, I think we would all agree that too many New Zealanders continue to die unnecessarily, and far too early, from diseases that could be managed - or in some cases prevented altogether with the right intervention.

The health targets measure the effectiveness of the health system to systematically assess and identify those at risk of, or already being affected by the risk factors.

The More heart and diabetes checks and Better help for smokers to quit health targets were introduced to help address these needs and focus attention on some of New Zealand’s biggest killers.

It’s not a box-ticking exercise, it’s about saving lives.

In the past, if you developed diabetes or heart disease, unless you went in to see your doctor about it, there was no guarantee it would be picked up until something began to go wrong.

Today, we are working to ensure that our systems will identify you at the relevant age and initiate a risk-assessment conversation.

As a result, we are beginning to gain better understanding and control over these conditions, helping reduce their incidence.

Increasing the percentage of people being checked and offering more effective support to those who need it, promotes a greater capacity for effective self-management and also reduces the likelihood of further complications developing.

Our aim is to prevent, reverse or slow the progression of the condition for as long as possible.

In May last year, as part of Budget 2013, the Government provided an additional $15.9 million for more heart and diabetes checks.

At the end of December 2013, 73 percent of the eligible population had received a heart and diabetes check – an almost 18 percent improvement over the country in the last 12 months.

Achievement of the 90 percent target is now well within reach.

As we get closer to achieving the target, we will need to renew our focus on the efforts we are making to support New Zealanders to manage their heart disease and diabetes.

Shared treatment decisions as part of care that is planned in partnership with patients is a feature in the updated cardiovascular risk assessment guidance the Professor Norman Sharpe contributed to developing.

Tobacco products, meanwhile, kill about 5000 New Zealanders each year. Each of these deaths is preventable.

The Government has confronted this issue head on.

It has set a goal of reducing smoking prevalence and tobacco availability to minimal levels, thereby making New Zealand essentially a smokefree nation by 2025.

I am proud to say that we have already reduced the prevalence of daily smoking in New Zealand to 15 percent.

However, we still have a long way to go to being smokefree – especially among our Māori and Pacific populations.

One of the key contributors towards our success in tackling tobacco use is the excellent progress that we have made with the Better help for smokers to quit health target.

Stopping smoking is the best thing a person can do for their health.

We have moved to make smoking a medical issue that is addressed by all healthcare professionals.

By December 2013, the hospital component of the Better help for smokers to quit target was 95 percent and that had been achieved, the national performance for the primary care target was 66.5 percent.

Although the primary care target is still below the 90 percent goal, it represents a significant increase on the almost 24 percent result recorded a year earlier.

I am sure many of you will be familiar with other steps the Government is taking to help achieve the smokefree 2025 goal. These have included:

• increasing excise tax on tobacco products on a regular basis until 1 January 2016

• removing tobacco displays from shops

• raising the fines for retailers who sell tobacco to people under the age of 18

• introducing a Bill to progress plain packaging of tobacco products.

Heart Foundation teams are working closely with both the Ministry and Primary Health Organisations to support achievement of these targets.

The gains that have been made in both these targets over the last year have been the result of collective effort.

At the same time the Heart Foundation continues to demonstrate leadership in a range of other areas.

For instance, working with the food industry to support modification of manufactured foods to reduce their content of fat, salt and sugar is a very effective way of improving the quality of the food we eat.

I would also like to acknowledge the work your teams are doing in schools and early childhood settings.

Providing children with opportunities to make healthy choice is key to sustained health gain in our adult population.

Before I finish, I would like to take the opportunity this morning to acknowledge the work of your Medical Director before he leaves his position with you.

Professor Sharpe, I would like to thank you for bringing your clinical leadership, your knowledge of the sector and your years of expertise to bear on the issue of cardiovascular health.

You have made a significant contribution over the last 30 years to expert reviews of guidance for assessment and management of heart disease, including being inaugural Chair of the New Zealand Guidelines Group.

More recently you have provided support to the Ministry and to my colleagues and I by acting as a national clinical leader for the More heart and diabetes checks health target, as well as being a tireless champion for rheumatic fever prevention.

I thank you for your contribution and we know that we will continue to benefit from your wisdom and leadership long after you leave the position as Medical Director at the Heart Foundation.

We wish you well.

It’s a privilege for me to be here with you this morning and I am very pleased to open your 2014 Forum.

Thank you.

Nō reira, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou, tēnā koutou katoa.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Pakistan Schoolchildren Killings

The slaughter of the children in Pakistan is incomprehensibly awful. On the side, it has thrown a spotlight onto something that’s become a pop cultural meme. Fans of the Homeland TV series will be well aware of the collusion between sections of the Pakistan military/security establishment on one hand and sections of the Taliban of the other…

Reportedly, it was the breakdown of the relationship between the Pakistan Taliban and the Pakistan military – which for the first time, began bombing Taliban enclaves in the Tribal Federated Areas earlier this year – that led to this revenge attack on the school, which is attended by the children of the military. More>>

 

Parliament Adjourns:

Police: Phillip Smith Investigation Passport Charge

A 25 year-old man will appear in the Whanganui District Court today charged with the Passports Act offence of False Representations. The charges were laid on December 9 by the Auckland-based Phillip Smith investigation... More>>

Intelligence: Inspector-General Accepts Apology For Leak Of Report

The Inspector-General of Intelligence and Security, Cheryl Gwyn, has accepted an unreserved apology from Hon Phil Goff MP for disclosing some of the contents of her recent Report into the Release of Information by the NZSIS in July and August 2011 to media prior to its publication. The Inspector-General will not take the matter any further. More>>

ALSO:

Drink: Alcohol Advertising Report Released

The report of the Ministerial Forum on Alcohol Advertising and Sponsorship has been released today, with Ministers noting that further work will be required on the feasibility and impact of the proposals. More>>

ALSO:

Other Report:

Leaked Cabinet Papers: Treasury Calls For Health Cuts

Leaked Cabinet papers that show that Government has been advised to cut the health budget by around $200 million is ringing alarm bells throughout the nursing and midwifery community. More>>

ALSO:

Maori Party: Tribunal Report Confirms Iwi Ownership Of Lake Waikaremoana

“We are pleased for the claimants that eight years after the hearing began on Lake Waikaremoana they have some closure,” says Māori Party Co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell. “Most importantly, the report confirms freshwater is a taonga and identifies the ownership rights of Tūhoe, Ngāti Ruapani, Ngāti Kahungunu, and Ngāi Tamaterangi to the lake bed.” More>>

ALSO:

Climate Performance Report - Not Achieved: NZ Government Part Of Global Climate Problem

The New Zealand Government’s position on climate change is part of the global problem that we need to overcome if we are to avoid catastrophic climate change, the Green Party said. More>>

ALSO:

NSW Police Statement: Three Dead Following Martin Place Siege

About 2.10am (Tuesday 16 December), a confrontation occurred between police and a man who had taken a number of people hostage inside a café on Martin Place. Shots were fired during the confrontation. As a result, the 50-year-old man was pronounced dead after being taken to hospital. Another man, aged 34, and a woman, aged 38, were pronounced dead after being taken to hospital. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Sydney Siege (And DHB Budget Cuts)
Whenever the authorities bring a siege situation to an end, there will be criticism if – as has happened in Sydney – any hostages are seriously hurt, or killed... In the Sydney Morning Herald this morning, columnist Peter Hartcher raises a different point – that the initial public response had been noticeably different to the agitated reactions of politicians and the media. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Income Inequality, And Yo Ho Ho Christmas Songs

As 2014 grinds to a close, we probably didn’t need one more reminder of this government’s ability to stare reality in the face and declare black to be a very fine shade of white... Yet on Wednesday, there was Finance Minister Bill English trying to tell RNZ that the OECD was (a) wrong (b) using old data and (c) somehow anti-growth and in any case (d) New Zealand allegedly already had a strongly re-distributive tax system... More>>

Werewolf: Public Health - The Silent Crisis

Gordon Campbell: New Zealand’s public health system has been in crisis for so long that its failings – and deteriorating performance vis a vis other developed countries – now tend to be treated as its normal mode of being. More>>

ALSO:

Parliament Today: House Adjourns For Summer

Parliament has risen for the summer break with the Adjournment Motion agreed just after 5pm on Wednesday. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news