Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Growth seen further lifting average wage by $7,500

Growth seen further lifting average wage by $7,500

The average annual wage is expected to increase by $7,500 to around $62,200 a year by 2018 if New Zealand achieves its economic growth forecasts over the next four years, Finance Minister Bill English says.

This follows a $3,000 increase in the average wage to $54,700 a year over the past two years.

In a pre-Budget speech to the Wellington Employers’ Chamber of Commerce today, he notes that Treasury expects the economy to grow by between 2 per cent and 4 per cent a year out to 2018.

“Quarterly GDP or current account statistics are not, in themselves, what matter to families,” Mr English says. “Jobs, higher incomes and opportunities to get ahead are what really matter.

“Everyone’s situation is different and many families are still finding times are challenging. But the benefits of a sustainably growing economy are tangible and meaningful,” Mr English says.

Over the past two years, as economic momentum has picked up, the average full-time wage has increased from $51,700 a year to $54,700 a year – an increase of $3,000.

Looking ahead and based on its economic growth outlook, Treasury’s preliminary Budget forecasts show the average wage will rise to around $62,200 a year in four years’ time – an increase of a further $7,500 by 2018.

“So if you take that six-year period as a whole, the average wage will have gone up $10,500, or around 20 per cent, compared to inflation of around 12 per cent over the same period,” Mr English says.

“The forecasts will also show around 170,000 more people will be working by 2018. Together with a falling unemployment rate, this will build on the 66,000 jobs created in the past year alone.

“That’s what a sustainably growing economy actually means for hard-working New Zealanders. And that’s why it’s important that we remain focused on our programme of considered and consistent change over time.”

As part of its programme to support sustainable economic growth, Mr English also confirmed that the National-led Government will be disciplined with new spending over coming years to avoid the Reserve Bank reacting by further tightening monetary policy and pushing up interest rates.

“The Budget next month will be about thoughtful targeted spending, not a spend-up. It will invest in better healthcare, more effective education, safer communities and less welfare dependency,” he says.

“We will have more to say about the Government’s future framework for fiscal policy in the Budget.

“As the Prime Minister confirmed two weeks ago, the Government will stick to its $1 billion Budget allowance for the 2014/15 financial year. This is the responsible thing to do.

“Imagine the effect on interest rates – and the rest of the economy – of a return to the $3 billion-plus annual spending allowances we saw under the previous Labour government from 2005 to 2008.”

By helping to restrict interest rate increases, the Government can make a significant and positive contribution to family budgets, Mr English says.

“Every one percentage point movement in mortgage interest rates is worth around $40 a week – or $2,000 a year – for a family with a $200,000 mortgage.

“So when you hear politicians promising to ramp up spending to pay for expensive election promises, you should remember that this would come at a significant cost to households and businesses.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Labour: Cash For Charter Schools, Mould For State Schools

“Recently released financial statements show the Whangarei charter school He Puna Marama received $3.9 million in government funding to the end of last year. Yet their audited accounts show they only spent $1.4 million on education, leaving almost $2.5 million over two years unaccounted for." More>>

ALSO:

Kiwirail Plans Shift From Electric: National Urged Not To Take Backwards Step

The National Government shouldn’t drag New Zealand backwards by replacing its climate friendly electric trains with carbon-polluting diesel trains, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

Capital Connection:

Harmful Digital Communication Bill Passes: Focus Must Be On Education

InternetNZ acknowledges the passage of the Harmful Digital Communications Bill into law this afternoon, and says that the sooner the education efforts at the heart of the legislation start, the better... More>>

ALSO:

3-Year Transport Plan: No Plans On Six Northland-Election Bridges

The Transport Authority’s decision to fund only four of the 10 bridges promised in National’s shameless Northland by-election bribe is a huge embarrassment for Transport Minister Simon Bridges, Labour’s Transport spokesperson Phil Twyford says. More>>

ALSO:

Gaza Blockade: Māori TV Crew Returning Safely From Israel

A Māori Television crew will be flown back from Israel after their boat was detained by the Israeli Navy while attempting to break the Gaza blockade. More>>

ALSO:

Family Violence: Increasing Reporting But Fewer Resolutions

“We are aware the Police have embarked on a significant programme of change in how they respond to family violence. The data suggests that adequate resourcing including investing in staff training, support and culture change will be required for this to be effective.” More>>

ALSO:

Health: NZ Children Still Suffer Rickets From Lack Of Vitamin D

Vitamin D deficiency continues to cause rickets in young New Zealanders, new University of Otago research has found. The researchers say that their finding suggests that at-risk mothers and children should be better targeted for Vitamin D supplementation. More>>

Also GPs, Housing, Milk: PM Press Conference On The UN Security Council

In a press conference today the Prime Minister discussed the upcoming appointment of New Zealand to chair the UN Security Council. He said they would put pressure Asad in Syria and attempt to “jump start” negotiations between Israel and Palestine. More>>

ALSO:

Housing: State Houses Could Sell To Overseas Groups

Bill English’s admission that he would sell hundreds of New Zealand’s state houses to the Australians is the latest lurch in the Government’s stumbling, half-baked housing policy, Labour’s housing spokesperson Phil Twyford says. More>>

ALSO:

AND:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news