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Anzac Day messages from Prime Minister and Governor-General

Anzac Day messages from the Prime Minister and the Governor-General

Anzac Day message 2014 – From the Prime Minister of New Zealand

It is almost 100 years since the events which led to Anzac Day.

The bonds forged between Australians and New Zealanders on the battlefields of Gallipoli is the cornerstone of this country’s most enduring relationship. Our soldiers fought side by side, as comrades and as friends.

Each year we pause on April 25th to remember those young men who scaled the cliffs at Gallipoli, and all New Zealanders and Australians who have served in wars around the globe since.

The First World War remains one of the most significant events in our shared history.

World War One changed how New Zealanders and Australians viewed themselves, and how other countries viewed us. The spirit of the ANZACs was forged on those foreign battlefields many years ago, yet it lives on today.

I encourage you to pause on Anzac Day this year and take some time to remember the brave men and women who have served our country.

Nations across the world prepare to commemorate 100 years since the outbreak of the First World War, and New Zealanders are also planning projects, events and activities to mark this anniversary.

Work on our National War Memorial Park is moving ahead in readiness for the centenary commemoration of Gallipoli next year. The precinct is dedicated to honouring New Zealanders’ experiences of military conflict in all wars, including the New Zealand Wars.

Through the inclusion of memorials from our allies and friends, we will honour the relationships forged between New Zealand and other nations during times of conflict and peace-keeping. Centenary commemorations will be a community endeavour with a huge range of events taking place throughout the country.

Today, on Anzac Day, we join with our fellow New Zealanders and remember the ultimate price paid by so many servicemen and women. We are grateful for their bravery, their courage and their service to our nation.

Lest we forget.

Rt Hon John Key
Prime Minister of New Zealand

Anzac Day message 2014 – From the Governor-General of New Zealand

In the New Zealand of 1914, 25 April was just like any other day.

Less than four months later New Zealand was a country at war, preparing for what was to be the first truly global conflict, the ‘Great War’ – the war to end all wars.

It was a war which influenced the development of New Zealand as a nation.

The events that took place at Gallipoli almost nine months into the First World War meant 25 April would become of enduring importance to all New Zealanders and Australians. On this day, every year since, we honour and remember the brave ANZAC soldiers who landed at and fought above the cove which now bears their name.

Today we remember not only those who served during the First World War but also the servicemen and women who have answered the call to defend our freedoms and those of others since, often very far from home.

Each year, New Zealanders journey to places across the globe to commemorate significant battles of New Zealand’s military heritage. Later this year, a delegation will travel to Cassino in Italy, to commemorate 70 years since that battle during the Second World War.

On Anzac Day, we are joined in our remembrance services today by people throughout the world. Services are taking place not only in Australia and New Zealand, but also in Turkey and just about every country where New Zealand or Australian expatriates live.

It is with great pride that wherever we may be, New Zealanders take time on this special day to honour and remember the commitment, courage, comradeship and spirit of all our servicemen and women, who exemplify the true Anzac spirit.


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