Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Assessment centre means fewer young people behind bars

Assessment centre means fewer young people behind bars

A new, multi-agency assessment centre for young people held in custody because of their offending will ensure the best possible response to young offenders, says Associate Social Development Minister Chester Borrows.

“We have no choice but to remove some young people from the community due to their offending, but it can only ever be a last resort,” says Mr Borrows.

“The new assessment centre will let Child Youth and Family give the Court the best possible information on which young people need to stay in custody, and which can be safely and effectively rehabilitated in the community.”

The centre, based at Child, Youth and Family’s Auckland youth justice residence, Korowai Manaaki, brings together health, education and work placement staff, along with social workers. They work as a team to complete a comprehensive assessment within ten days of the young person coming into the residence.

The assessment identifies the young person’s risk and protective factors more efficiently.

“Rarely does youth offending happen in isolation. Most of these kids have addiction problems, they might be experiencing violence at home, or have health or education needs that no one’s picked up.

“We know that keeping young people closely connected to all the positive influences in their life – mentors, whānau, work and community-based supports – helps get them on the right track.

“That’s why we want community-based options to be the first port of call for these young people. Whenever appropriate, supported bail or electronic monitoring will be used, so they can return to their community with a support plan that keeps everyone safe.

“This won’t be possible in every case – assessment will inevitably show that for some, staying in residence for a while is the best decision.

The new assessment centre is part of the Youth Crime Action Plan’s aim to reduce the length of time young people spend in residences. The trial, which began on 1 April this year, is used for every young person coming into a youth justice residence in the Auckland region. The trial will be rolled out to other youth justice residences in coming months.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Midwives On Pay Equity: Historic Bill Of Rights Case For High Court

“We have been left with no choice.” That from Karen Guilliland, the Chief Executive of the New Zealand College of Midwives, as the organisation prepares to file a pay parity discrimination case on the basis of gender under the NZ Bill of Rights Act in the High Court. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Children’s Commission Report On CYF

Accusing the overworked and underfunded staff at Child, Youth and Family of a “dump and run culture of neglect” is the kind of luxury that a Children’s Commissioner can afford to indulge in from his own comfy perch in the bureaucracy. More>>

ALSO:

Mt Eden Prison: Serco Inquiry Extended

A two month delay to the Government investigation into prison fight clubs shows the extent of problems within the Serco circus, says Labour’s Corrections spokesperson Kelvin Davis. More>>

ALSO:

Health And Safety: Late Addition Of National Security Provisions A Concern

The New Zealand Law Society has expressed its significant concerns at the last-minute addition to the Health and Safety Reform Bill of provisions for a closed material procedure for court proceedings where national security is involved. More>>

ALSO:

Rugby And Beer: World Cup Alcohol Bill Passes

ACT MP David Seymour’s Sale and Supply of Alcohol (Extended licensing hours during Rugby World Cup) Bill completed its third reading by 99 to 21... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news