Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Te Ururoa Flavell: Budget Speech


21 MAY 2014; 5PM

Te Ururoa Flavell: Budget Speech

Tēnā koe, Mr Assistant Speaker. Kia ora tātou e te Whare.

These are historic times to be speaking to the 2014 Budget as a strong and independent Māori voice in the Parliament of this land.

In two days time we celebrate ten years to the day since over 200 people gathered at Hoani Waititi Marae in Auckland. At that time representatives from Te Tai Tokerau , Ngāti Whātua , Tāmaki-makau-rau , Tainui , Raukawa, Waiariki , Te Arawa in my area, Mataatua and Ngati Porou , Ngāti Kahungunu , Te Atiawa, Ngāti Apa, Whanganui, Raukawa ki te Tonga, and the New Zealand Māori Council journeyed across the country. They attended a hui to discuss the need for an independent Māori political voice.

It was that hui that mobilised over 200 Māori leaders to build on the momentum gained from the hīkoi opposing Labour’s Foreshore and Seabed Act of 2004. This hui unanimously agreed that the people are ready to act collectively to bring to the fore Māori interests of value to all New Zealanders. So began the journey of the Māori Party, a journey that has taken us through a three-year term in Opposition and two subsequent terms in a relationship with the Government.

Today I read a release from the Labour Party that talked about the Māori Party gains in this year’s Budget, and it described them as being mere crumbs on the table—crumbs on the table. If the $100 million of new money for Māori development that we achieved in Budget 2014 was crumbs, then the money received in times of surplus when Labour was in Government equates to a mere third of a crumb—a third of a crumb.

I am thinking of the days of plenty, in 2007, when, theoretically, Māori should have been at the very best we have ever seen. Times were good. In that memorable year, Dr Michael Cullen announced a mere $35.6 million committed not just to Māori but also to Treaty-related initiatives—$35 million.

I say memorable because, of course, 2007 was the year the Labour Party chose to vote against the United Nations’ Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People , citing opposition particularly to article 3—the right to self-determination. That happened on 13 September. One month later in the same year, 2007, on 15 October, more than 300 police carried out the dawn raids on a dozen houses all over Aotearoa in response to what they described as terrorist threats from the indigenous activists. So, yes, in the context of the Tūhoe raids and the rejection of the declaration on the rights of indigenous peoples, I guess that even a third of a crumb is memorable.

Comparing the two, then—$35 million in 2007 for Māori and the Treaty as opposed to $100 million of new money this year for the Māori Party initiatives. That is how it stacks up.

But listen, there is a bit more: $35 million in 2007 compared with $300 million across a whole range of votes in 2014—of both new votes and reprioritised funding, which have tangible benefits for whānau , hapū, and iwi.

The 2007 equivalent is just a little bit over 10 percent of a crumb—10 percent of a crumb. That year was, if you like, a perfect storm. There was a rare combination of circumstances that came together to convince iwi Māori that the time had come for a new direction. That direction came some twelve months later with the relationship formalised between the Māori Party and the Government to form a coalition of the willing to negotiate a more successful future for all to enjoy.

Budget 2014 reveals that the Māori Party has pushed this Government hard on a number of matters, including
· a commitment to establish the $30 million Māori Information and Communications Development Fund in 2014-15,
· the establishment of a $5 million Te Mana o Te Wai Fund,
· the establishment of the centre of research excellence for the funding of Mātauranga Māori research,
· recognising the relevance and effectiveness of Whānau Ora as a lead social and economic transformation approach for Māori, Pasifika peoples, and other New Zealanders, through the ongoing funding committed to Whānau Ora, the work of three new commissioning agencies, and the establishment of a Treaty-based partnership group comprising senior Ministers and iwi leaders, to provide joint direction, oversight, and promotion of Whānau Ora. I go on.
· Following up on the recommendations of Te Paepae Motuhake, the name of that report was Te Reo Mauriora, through to the Māori Language Strategy and the proposed amendments to the Māori Language Act that the Hon Dr Pita Sharples hopes to introduce into this House prior to the House lifting for the 2014 election,
· securing funding to invest in three economic development initiatives that will address some of the outcomes sought in the Māori Economic Development Strategy and Action Plan, He Kai Kei Aku Ringa,
· the funding secured for Māori radio and Te Māngai Pāho for iwi Māori economic development,
· $16 million for the Māori housing fund, to support the repairs and rebuilds of rural houses and developing Māori social housing providers,
· $90 million to provide free general practitioner visits and free prescriptions for all of our tamariki up to age 13 and,
· most important and most exciting of all, Moving the Māori Nation fund, which is about investing in capacity-building and development and support for sporting and cultural excellence.

That is just a start. Do we believe in the collective rights of indigenous peoples? Well, hell yeah—hell yeah.

What is even more exciting about the 2014 Budget is that it shows the maturing of the relationship between the Crown and iwi—a relationship that has been evident through iwi leaders being now able to be intimately associated with the policy development process right across key portfolios of the Government.

We are particularly proud of the Budget’s $500 million fund, the package to support children and families as the absolute foundation of our nation. That is what having influence is all about.

If I can in the last few minutes that are available to me to talk about the Budget, I would like to just angle a little bit of discussion across to one who is leaving the House today, Mr Shane Jones.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

#SaveCampbellLive : Mediaworks Delivered 104,000 Petition Signatures At TV3's Newton HQ
#PonyTailGate #TailGate Full Coverage

Pukeahu Park : ANZAC 100th Anniversary Dawn Service In Pictures

Roughly 18,000 people gathered this morning at Pukeahu Memorial Park for the Anzac day centenary. Anticipating the large turnout, patrons arrived as early as 4.30. It was virtually impossible to get near the Memorial after 5am. By 6, the crowds on Taranaki Street had stretched as far back as the Z Petrol station.

The screens erected around the park displayed the live events to those who had turned up. The heat generated by the huge number of people caused many to take a turn. Medics and ambulances were on hand for the fainting crowd members. Only twenty minutes into the ceremony, one medic said they had already dealt with 15 to 20 spells. More>>

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

War: What’s To Commemorate?

Gordon Campbell in Werewolf: Is there anything that can be validly commemorated on this 100th anniversary of Gallipoli? Beyond, that is, a fleeting sense of empathy with the thousands of soldiers killed or wounded on April 25 1915 and in the months thereafter, until the whole thing was finally called off in December 1915. More>>

MORE IN WEREWOLF:

ALSO:

Peter Ellis Case: Minister Declines Request For Commission Of Inquiry

Justice Minister Amy Adams has declined a request from supporters of Peter Ellis for a Commission of Inquiry on the basis that an inquiry cannot be used to determine the liability of any person. More>>

Quakes: New Process For Red Zone Crown Offers

Canterbury Earthquake Recovery Minister Gerry Brownlee has announced a process to give everyone a say on the Crown offers to owners of vacant, commercial/industrial and uninsured properties in the Residential Red Zone. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Battle Obama Is Waging Over The TPP

For the past two and a half years, this column has been arguing that the fate of the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) deal will hinge on whether US President Barack Obama can win Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) from Congress... Last week, the White House finally, finally unveiled a draft TPA Bill. More>>

ALSO:

Greens: Govt Breaks Free Doctors Visit Promise To Kids

Documents obtained by the Green Party show that the Government decided to fund only 90 percent of doctors’ visits for children suffering from an injury in an attempt trim the cost of the so-called “free” visits. More>>

ALSO:

Other Wars: Extension Of NZDF Commitment In Afghanistan

The New Zealand Defence Force’s commitment of mentors and support staff to the Afghan National Army Officer Academy in Afghanistan has been extended out to December 2016, Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says. More>>

PM's Press Conference: Auckland Property Prices Increasing "Too Rapidly"

John Key accepted that Auckland property prices 'are going up too rapidly” in a press conference held today in Wellington, however he said that this is not anything new. More>>

ALSO:

Press Conference: ANZAC PMs Concerned About ISIL Bringing The War Home

Prime Minister Key and Prime Minister Abbott spoke of the bond formed between Australia and New Zealand in the “baptism of fire” of Gallipoli. Abbott stated that New Zealand and Australia’s values and interests are linked, and this is reflected in the joint operation in Iraq which will begin shortly. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news