Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Conservatives Need a Lesson in Cultural Competency

MEDIA STATEMENT

23 JULY 2014

Conservatives Need a Lesson in Cultural Competency

Māori Party Co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell says the Conservative Party’s policies to get rid of the Māori seats, shut down the Waitangi Tribunal and implement ‘one law for all’ are ignorant, dangerous, and are not welcome in our political system or our country.

“New Zealand needs leaders that understand that indigenous rights are human rights, that cultural diversity and representation is good for democracy, and that the constitutional basis for our nationhood lies in Te Tiriti o Waitangi. We want all aspiring members of parliament to understand that dedicated Māori electorate seats distinguish our democratic process in Aotearoa,” says Mr Flavell. “The push for binding referendums by the Conservatives ties into their view around the Māori electorate seats that ‘what is good for one is good for us all.’ The Māori electorate seats are a conversation between Māori and the Crown, not for the majority of New Zealand making a decision for a minority.”

“We must not forget the first race-based law was introduced in 1858 – the English Laws Act which in one single statute imposed the culture, customs and conventions of Britain on all New Zealanders. We have been in catch-up mode ever since, trying to build a more representative parliament that encompasses all New Zealanders, not just those with a British passport. There is such competition to vie for votes based on drawing out inflammatory attitudes that unfortunately are still prevalent in some quarters. Politicians have a responsibility to educate and inform, not act in such a way as to provoke incite racial division and tension.”

“The Māori seats have been an important mechanism to try to protect and develop Māori interests, and Colin Craig needs to know that his party has no right to step in and try to take the rights away from tangata whenua – only tangata whenua have that right to determine what is in our best interests,” says Dr Pita Sharples.

“Labour has tried in the past through the Foreshore and Seabed Act and by opposing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People – and look how that went down. We have been down that track before and we do not want a repeat run. The reality is the New Zealand Government – after advocacy from the Māori Party – signed up to the Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People in 2010 and it is here to stay.”

“It is so disappointing, in 2014, to hear the rhetoric espousing ideals of a vanilla nation, ‘beyond the colour of our neighbour’s skin’,” says Hon Tariana Turia, Co-leader of the Māori Party. “The Māori Party has always been proud to initiate initiatives around cultural competency in health, in education and across the social sector. Culture counts. We do not want to ignore or render irrelevant the rich cultural diversity that characterises our communities.”

“We have had over 170 years of attempts of assimilation from various politicians and political parties, and we continue to suffer the consequences of that policy to this day. The old assimilation policy is hidden behind a few new terms and slogans, such as One Law for All, but the intention is the same and we know all about it. In this day and age there is no place for political leaders who know nothing about our history and know nothing about us. There is no excuse for being ignorant and we the people will never ever tolerate policies that aim at taking things away from us without our informed consent. No more.”

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On Tomorrow’s Speeches By John Key And
Andrew Little

The Key government has already kicked off the political year on a stridently ideological note, with Environment Minister Nick Smith choosing to lay all manner of sins at the door of the Resource Management Act.

Tomorrow, the government will wheeling out its best salesman – Prime Minister John Key – to sell its plans for state housing, which happens to be another of the government’s most contentious, most ideologically-driven policy packages. Presumably, Key will be trying not to double down on the rhetoric, and thereby leave room for Labour leader Andrew Little to sound like the centrist voice of reason.

Key will have his work cut out, though. More>>

 

Transport: Auckland Looks To Light Rail

The Board of Auckland Transport has called for an investigation into a light rail network, which could relieve traffic congestion on some of the region’s busiest roads. This stems from work in 2012 (the City Centre Future Access study) which responded to a government request to develop a robust and achievable solution for access to the CBD. More>>

ALSO:

RMA: Smith's Claims Don't Match Evidence - Greens

The Motu group’s research into the impacts of planning rules looked at the costs related to housing development but not the benefits of environmental protections and does not recommend significant changes to the RMA to reduce the cost of new house builds. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Similarities Between John Key And David Cameron

For years now, David Cameron has been the closest available thing to a mentor/analogue to our Prime Minister, such that Key watchers could be interested in an analysis of Cameron that appeared in the British press over the Christmas break. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Ian Fletcher Resignation & GCSB’s New Role

It may well be that after being shoulder-tapped in Queensland for the GCSB job, three years of living in Wellington has been enough for Fletcher and his family, given that the pending review of the GCSB would have required an even longer commitment from him. Three years of Wellington’s weather is enough for anyone... More>>

ALSO:

Ian Apperley: $10m Or $100m For New Wellington Council IT System?

I feel a Tui Billboard coming on. I commented the other day that it looked like the Council’s Ninth big project was a potential $100 million plus... The Mayor has responded: “I am reassured by the Chief Executive and by Anthony Wilson that the proposed budget is in the region of $10 million.” More>>

ALSO:

Southern Ocean:
Navy Intercepts Illegal Fishing Vessels

Foreign Minister Murray McCully today put illegal fishing vessels operating in the Southern Ocean on notice and vowed to take action against their owners. “As part of a multi-agency operation, the HMNZS WELLINGTON has intercepted two vessels claiming to be flagged to Equatorial Guinea, fishing illegally in the Southern Ocean.” Mr McCully says. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news