Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Conservation grant supports bird recovery

Conservation grant supports bird recovery


Conservation Minister Dr Nick Smith today announced Wildbase Recovery Community Trust is to receive a $90,000 grant from the Department of Conservation to put towards a new state-of-the-art rehabilitation facility for birds and wildlife.

“New Zealand’s most challenging conservation issue is the decline in our native bird populations. We need to raise public awareness of the threat from pests like rats, stoats and possums that kill 25 million native birds each year. We need facilities like Wildbase Recovery to improve public understanding of our special birds and save those birds that are injured and can be rehabilitated back into the wild,” Dr Smith says.

Wildbase Recovery Community Trust is a charitable trust formed in partnership with local iwi, Palmerston North City Council, Massey University, Rotary and the Department of Conservation for the sole purpose of building, operating and maintaining the community-funded Wildbase Recovery.

“This dual-purpose facility will allow an improved rehabilitation experience for birds from Massey University’s Wildbase Hospital and an incredible experience for people to engage and learn about some of New Zealand’s most endangered native species,” Dr Smith says.

The 2900-square metre Wildbase Recovery facility will include five display aviaries and nine off-display rehabilitation aviaries, designed to allow public viewing of recuperating wildlife in a natural habitat environment while protecting the wildlife from public interaction. The aviaries will be located at Palmerston North’s Esplanade. The Department has provided a 30-year permit for care of native animals at the facility.

The aviaries will include a circular flighted aviary for kaka, kea, tui and kereru, a five metre-tall raptor aviary for karearea (native falcon), recovery pools for ocean, shore and wetlands birds to restore their waterproofing, and a place for ground-dwelling birds including kiwi and takahe. Birds and other wildlife are expected to spend an average of six weeks in rehabilitation at Wildbase Recovery before release.

Wildbase Recovery will be built and owned by Palmerston North City Council and co-managed by Massey University’s Veterinary School, working alongside DOC, local iwi Rangitāne O Manawatū, and Rotary.

“I particularly want to acknowledge the leadership and support of Palmerston North Mayor Jono Naylor. He has been a champion for the conservation of our native birds and helped to build Palmerston North’s national leadership role in this area,” Dr Smith says.

“DOC’s support for this project at both a regulatory and financial level sends a strong message to other donors that this project is an initiative which will provide conservation and community benefits and deserves their support.”

Further information is available at: www.wildbaserecovery.co.nz

ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ombudsman’s Verdict On Paula Rebstock And Ian Rennie

Unfortunately, the brave and damning report by Ombudsman Ron Paterson on the “flawed” and “unfair” inquiry conducted by Dame Paula Rebstock into events at MFAT pulls back the veil on a far wider issue. More>>

ALSO:

Charities' Report: Stressed Families - Overstretched Services

“Like so many of the whānau and families they serve social service organisations are under huge financial stress. The support demanded from desperate people in communities is far outreaching the resources available.” More>>

ALSO:

Detention: Wellingtonians Protest Treatment Of Refugees

Peace Action Wellington (PAW) and around 50 Wellingtonians blockaded the Australian High Commission, creating a symbolic detention centre to protest the Australian Government's policy of mandatory offshore detention for refugees and asylum seekers. More>>

ALSO:

Diver's Alarums: Breach Means Training Provider Must Repay $1.47 Million

The New Zealand School of Outdoor Studies is to repay $1.47 million (GST-exclusive) to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) following an investigation which showed that some student enrolments between 2009 -2014 could not be validated and that courses were under-delivered against their agreement with the TEC. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Government Plans Suggest Bulk Funding Return

Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Auckland Looks Long Term To Pay-Per-Km Road Pricing

Aucklanders can expect to be paying variable rates per kilometre to travel on the city's most congested roads under an emerging transport strategy being formulated by the government and the Auckland Council. More>>

ALSO:

Despite Promises: Government Extends Iraq Deployment

Cabinet has agreed to extend New Zealand’s contribution to the joint New Zealand-Australia mission to train Iraqi Security Forces until November 2018. More>>

ALSO:

On The 'Terrorism' Card:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news