Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Challenge boosts protection of biological heritage

Hon Steven Joyce
Minister of Science & Innovation

29 August 2014 Media Statement
Challenge boosts protection of biological heritage

The National Science Challenge – New Zealand’s Biological Heritage Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho – is to receive funding of $25.8 million over five years for research to protect and manage the country’s biodiversity, improve our biosecurity, and enhance our resilience to harmful organisms.

Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce says the Challenge spans a wide range of scientific disciplines and will include researchers from nearly all New Zealand’s relevant research institutions.

The Challenge will be hosted by the Crown research institute Landcare Research. It includes researchers from the other six Crown research institutes, and all eight New Zealand universities.

It also draws on research expertise of Te Papa Tongarewa, the Department of Conservation, the Ministry for Primary Industries, regional councils and Ngāi Tahu.

“New Zealand’s future is based on its biological heritage—our economy, lifestyle and sense of identity are all underpinned by our distinctive landscapes and healthy natural and production ecosystems,” Mr Joyce says.

“This Challenge will ensure that New Zealanders have the knowledge, tools and technologies to better protect our primary production-based economy, precious native flora and fauna and unique environments for future generations.”

The Challenge integrates research in biodiversity and biosecurity, research areas that have traditionally been addressed separately, but which are inter-dependent.

“The research proposal developed by the Challenge consortium is a fine example of how the Challenge process has brought together a diverse range of researchers to focus on the big science-based issues facing the country. In this case, research will protect and enhance the natural and managed ecosystems fundamental to New Zealanders’ economy and wellbeing”, Mr Joyce says.

Funding of $25.8 million has been approved for a five-year research programme, subject to the finalisation of contract conditions. Up to $207 million over 10 years is available for Challenge research, including Crown research institute core funding of more than $140 million.

Research in the New Zealand’s Biological Heritage Challenge – Ngā Koiora Tuku Iho – will ensure that we:

• understand New Zealand’s native and introduced biodiversity, and have real-time bioheritage information to inform management decisions
• support natural resource management with understanding of the links between biodiversity, ecosystems, mātauranga Māori, and environmental and economic pressures
• have diverse and vibrant natural and production ecosystems that support long-term sustainability
• have appropriate tools to effectively monitor and evaluate biosecurity and biodiversity status and trends
• build social partnerships as the basis of an enduring social licence to apply new management methodologies, tools, technologies and solutions.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ombudsman’s Verdict On Paula Rebstock And Ian Rennie

Unfortunately, the brave and damning report by Ombudsman Ron Paterson on the “flawed” and “unfair” inquiry conducted by Dame Paula Rebstock into events at MFAT pulls back the veil on a far wider issue. More>>

ALSO:

Charities' Report: Stressed Families - Overstretched Services

“Like so many of the whānau and families they serve social service organisations are under huge financial stress. The support demanded from desperate people in communities is far outreaching the resources available.” More>>

ALSO:

Detention: Wellingtonians Protest Treatment Of Refugees

Peace Action Wellington (PAW) and around 50 Wellingtonians blockaded the Australian High Commission, creating a symbolic detention centre to protest the Australian Government's policy of mandatory offshore detention for refugees and asylum seekers. More>>

ALSO:

Diver's Alarums: Breach Means Training Provider Must Repay $1.47 Million

The New Zealand School of Outdoor Studies is to repay $1.47 million (GST-exclusive) to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) following an investigation which showed that some student enrolments between 2009 -2014 could not be validated and that courses were under-delivered against their agreement with the TEC. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Government Plans Suggest Bulk Funding Return

Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Auckland Looks Long Term To Pay-Per-Km Road Pricing

Aucklanders can expect to be paying variable rates per kilometre to travel on the city's most congested roads under an emerging transport strategy being formulated by the government and the Auckland Council. More>>

ALSO:

Despite Promises: Government Extends Iraq Deployment

Cabinet has agreed to extend New Zealand’s contribution to the joint New Zealand-Australia mission to train Iraqi Security Forces until November 2018. More>>

ALSO:

On The 'Terrorism' Card:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news