Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 


Peters: Political Side Show Sidelining Economic Debate

Rt Hon Winston Peters
New Zealand First Leader
2 September 2014

Blenheim Public Meeting
Tuesday 2 September, 7.30pm

Clubs of Marlborough, 42 Alfred St, Blenheim

Political Side Show Sidelining Serious Economic Debate

New Zealand is in the throes of a campaign like nothing it has ever experienced before.

Sadly the level of acrimony, animosity, and sheer hatred that is building up in the closing weeks does not bode well for this country’s future.

Part of the responsibility for this state of affairs unavoidably lies with the Prime Minister, because it is clear that he has failed to act when all the red flags should have been flying in his office.

It doesn’t matter what side of the political divide you are on because the overwhelming emerging evidence, whilst not conclusive in and of itself, points to something seriously wrong with New Zealand’s recent politics.

Politics has always been a tough, rough business, but the level of underhandedness and character assassination of civil servants and opponents, and even fellow party members and MPs, has no historical precedent.

Some time ago New Zealand First called for a full scale Commission of Inquiry, with the power and personalities to get at the truth.

And so it is difficult to understand why the Prime Minister is pushing for a much lesser, restricted inquiry into one circumstance, when the obvious alternative of a full and proper inquiry would have the benefit of proving his claimed innocence.

A restrictive inquiry would not exonerate the 9th floor of the Beehive in the minds of the public.

We urge him to see the sense in what is being called for here.

Political side show sidelining serious economic debate

The fall out of the serious side show we are witnessing is sidelining serious economic debate.

Whatever ones political persuasion, we surely have to admit that our economy is not doing nearly as well as it used to do, and could do again.

The latest forecasts have exports in decline, interest rates rising, GDP growth falling, all to the extent that a recent group of bank economists in Auckland admitted that rather than being a ‘rock star’ economy (the phrase one of their colleagues used a year ago), New Zealand is quite possibly an economy that is about to hit the rocks.

They warned further that there would be no soft landing.

With an artificially high dollar, a dramatic 40 per cent fall in our dairy returns and a decline in our forestry exports as well, their warning has to be taken seriously.

Remember, these bank economists have been recent cheerleaders, now turning into doomsday merchants.

When bank economists sound the alarm bells, given their propensity to talk up the market, it is surely time to start taking notice.

New Zealand First’s greatest regret in this campaign is the failure of political participants to outline a real, practical strategy to treble our GDP growth, rapidly expand our export growth, whilst shoring up that other export industry, Tourism New Zealand.

Where, for example, is the debate on our seriously inflated dollar, so damaging to exporters and the provinces, as well as the tourism industry?

Fundamentals of New Zealand First’s Economic Plan

1. Changing the Reserve Bank Act, so that our currency advantages exporters and the provinces, and not international interests.
2. Prioritising export growth and New Zealand’s savings.
3. Aligning taxation policy with progressive economic outcomes whilst delivering much greater fairness to all New Zealanders.
a) That does not mean increasing taxation. But rather reducing it in specific areas where we get the economic wealth creation outcome we seek.
b) Growing our wealth so that promises on social policy delivery can be met.
4. Promoting the new IT industries as a growing back up to our added value primary production and export objectives.
5. Regaining control of so much of our economy that has been swept into foreign ownership.

Foreign Ownership

As you know, much of what is owned in the Marlborough region is in foreign hands.

We have a great wine industry, and much of this industry is now in foreign hands.

Much of Marlborough’s forestry is in foreign hands.

Much of our fishing is caught by foreign crews on foreign boats.

So there is a worsening risk of more foreign ownership.

Under the National Government we have seen massive losses of land going into overseas ownership.

The amount is frightening.

The scale of the loss is breath-taking.
One million hectares has gone into full or partial foreign ownership under National – an area six times the size of Stewart Island.

Yet National pretends foreign ownership does not matter.

Steven Joyce said on the Lochinver Station purchase that “it’s a ridiculously small amount of land.”

So for National the 14,000 hectares of the Lochinver Station is trivial.

Really!

What we have is an open door for foreigners to buy our land, houses and businesses with encouragement from Minister’s like Joyce.

But New Zealanders are rightly outraged by National putting the interests of foreigners first, and New Zealanders last.

So in this election campaign New Zealand First is saying to all New Zealanders:

Your country is at risk – don’t lose it!

New Zealand First is the only party with a consistent record and policy on foreign ownership.

We will put the brakes on foreign ownership by imposing strict controls in land, housing and strategic business assets.

We will start collecting comprehensive information on foreign ownership of land and property for the first time in New Zealand, something National has deliberately avoided doing, and even opposing our home and land register proposals.

The Prime Minister said such an idea was silly.

And we will replace that toothless poodle – the fig leaf called the Overseas Investment Commission (OIO) with a new and powerful agency with real power to stop the sell-off.

Only purchases with proven benefit to New Zealand in terms of jobs and real new investment will be allowed to go ahead.

The rubber-stamp is going in the bin!

One of the aspects that the new agency for foreign ownership will consider that is not covered by the OIO is tax.

Currently foreign investors have access to tax advantages that do not apply to New Zealand residents.

This tax advantage is another way foreign owners easily out buy New Zealanders on the same market. We will put an end to the tax advantages foreign buyers enjoy over New Zealand buyers.

And we will start the buy back.

We will use the Cullen Fund and our KiwiFund scheme to buy back what were once our assets.

KiwiFund, our new KiwiSaver option, will be run by a government agency with low fees and a capital return guarantee will invest primarily In New Zealand assets like land as well as infrastructure.

Fishing Policy

Any visitor to Marlborough would know the people here have an enthusiasm for recreational fishing.

Fishing regulations and policy needs to be fair and balanced between recreational and commercial fishing interests.

To be sustainable, wise fishing policy would serve both interests.

Currently it does not.

For example, the Blue Cod fishery is closed from September 1 to December 20, but only to recreational fishers.

And New Zealand First is seriously concerned about the state of the Sound’s scallop fishery.

New Zealand First understands that fishing is a New Zealander’s birth right.

A birth right which we will not sacrifice.

Our fishing policy is fair, balanced, and sustainable for all involved.

That’s why we are on the side of recreational fishing, whilst fully compensating commercial fishing that will have to exit some parts of our coastline.

If you’re a recreational fisher and you are fair minded, you will appreciate that there is a price for sustainable policies.

So fairness to all sides is what New Zealand First stands for.

We will defend you but we won’t send some commercial fishing family onto the dole queue while doing it.

That’s fair.

That’s common sense.

Like all our policies, our approach to ownership is realistic, practical and affordable.

It’s common sense!

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

More Rent Assisstance, Less State-Owned Housing:
John Key Speech - Next Steps In Social Housing

"We are going to ensure that more people get into social housing over the next three years, whether that is run by Housing New Zealand or a community provider.

The social housing budget provides for around 62,000 income-related rent subsidies a year. We are committed to increasing that to around 65,000 subsidies by 2017/18, which will cost an extra $40 million a year." More>>

ALSO:

The Future Of Work: Andrew Little - State Of The Nation 2015

In 2005 when I led the EPMU we worked together with Air New Zealand to find a way to keep engineering jobs that were heading overseas. A lot of these workers were people I’d known for years and they were facing not just losing their jobs but not being able to find the kind of work they do without going overseas. A lot of people were facing personal and financial upheaval.

It was hard work but in the end we kept more than 300 skilled and well-paid jobs in New Zealand. And we managed to benefit Air New Zealand and its workforce with productivity gains too... More>>

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Sabin Case, The Pressures On Greece And (Songs About) Coyotes

Mike Sabin is a National MP, and the current chairman of Parliament’s law and order committee. Yet reportedly, he is being investigated by the Police over an assault complaint... However, the PM will not comment on any aspect of the story. More>>

ALSO:

Houses, ISIS, King (& Catton): PM Post-Cabinet Press Conference

The Prime Minister met with reporters to discuss: • Social housing, the Auckland housing market • The prospect of joining international forces to combat ISIS • David Bain’s compensation • The lowering of the flag for the King of Saudi Arabia's death ... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Tomorrow’s Speeches By John Key And Andrew Little

The Key government has already kicked off the political year on a stridently ideological note, with Environment Minister Nick Smith choosing to lay all manner of sins at the door of the RMA. Tomorrow, the government will wheeling out its best salesman – Prime Minister John Key – to sell its plans for state housing… . More>>

ALSO:

Transport: Auckland Looks To Light Rail

The Board of Auckland Transport has called for an investigation into a light rail network, which could relieve traffic congestion on some of the region’s busiest roads. This stems from work in 2012 (the City Centre Future Access study) which responded to a government request to develop a robust and achievable solution for access to the CBD. More>>

ALSO:

RMA: Smith's Claims Don't Match Evidence - Greens

The Motu group’s research into the impacts of planning rules looked at the costs related to housing development but not the benefits of environmental protections and does not recommend significant changes to the RMA to reduce the cost of new house builds. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Similarities Between John Key And David Cameron

For years now, David Cameron has been the closest available thing to a mentor/analogue to our Prime Minister, such that Key watchers could be interested in an analysis of Cameron that appeared in the British press over the Christmas break. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Ian Fletcher Resignation & GCSB’s New Role

It may well be that after being shoulder-tapped in Queensland for the GCSB job, three years of living in Wellington has been enough for Fletcher and his family, given that the pending review of the GCSB would have required an even longer commitment from him. Three years of Wellington’s weather is enough for anyone... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
More RSS  RSS News AlertsNews Alerts
 
 
 
Parliament
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news