Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Open letter calls for removal of poll provisions for Māori

Open letter to the Government calls for removal of poll provisions for Māori

Local Government New Zealand is calling on the Government to remove poll provisions for Māori wards and constituencies.

In an open letter to the Government, LGNZ seeks to remove those sections (s.19ZA to 19ZG) of the Local Electoral Act 2001 (LEA) that allow for polls of electors on whether or not a city, district or region can establish Māori wards and constituencies.

Following its decision in 2001 to establish Māori constituencies for the Bay of Plenty Regional Council, Parliament amended the LEA to give this power to councils, in consultation with their citizens. The amendment also allowed electors, through a binding poll, to either require a council to establish wards and constituencies or to overturn a council decision to that effect.

LGNZ President Dave Cull says that these poll provisions do not apply to other wards and constituencies. This marks the provision as unfair to Māori and inconsistent with the principle of equal treatment enshrined in the Treaty of Waitangi.

“Either the poll provisions should apply to all wards or they should apply to none,” says Mr Cull.

LGNZ’s concern is that the current system is not fair because it does not treat the creation of all wards in a similar manner.

“The changes to the LEA were intended to increase Māori representation in local authorities but the intent has failed, in large part due to the nature of the poll provisions,” says Mr Cull.

Since 2002 the only Māori wards or constituencies established have been those introduced by the Waikato Regional Council, by council resolution in 2012, and the Wairoa District Council, agreed by poll in 2016. The effect of the poll provisions have been to discourage councils from establishing Māori wards and in one case, New Plymouth District Council, was used to reverse a council’s decision.

It is LGNZ’s view that the Government must act now to address the unfairness created by the poll provisions and put in place legislative change that will enable appropriate options for Māori representation in local authorities where local councils choose to do so.

*Ends*

For more information contact LGNZ’s Deputy Chief Executive Advocacy, Helen Mexted on 029 924 1221 or helen.mexted@lgnz.co.nz

About LGNZ and local government in New Zealand

Local Government New Zealand (LGNZ) is the peak body representing New Zealand's 78 local, regional and unitary authorities. LGNZ advocates for local democracy, develops local government policy, and promotes best practice and excellence in leadership, governance and service delivery. Through its work strengthening sector capability, LGNZ contributes to the economic success and vibrancy of communities and the nation.

The local government sector plays an important role. In addition to giving citizens a say in how their communities are run, councils own a broad range of community assets worth more than $120 billion. These include 90 per cent of New Zealand's road network, the bulk of the country's water and waste water networks, and libraries, recreation and community facilities. Council expenditure is approximately $8.5 billion dollars, representing approximately 4 per cent of Gross Domestic Product and 11 per cent of all public expenditure.

For more information visit www.lgnz.co.nz

http://img.scoop.co.nz/media/pdfs/1803/Ltr_to_Leaders_re_Maori_ward_poll.pdf

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Spying On Politicians, Activists, Iwi, Quake Victims: "Failings Across Public Service"

A State Services Commission investigation into the use of external security consultants by government agencies has uncovered failings across the public service, including breaches of the code of conduct...

However, the inquiry found no evidence of widespread inappropriate surveillance by external security consultants on behalf of government agencies. More>>

 

Children's Commissioner: Child Poverty Law "Historic Cause For Celebration"

...It represents a cross-party commitment to a fundamental shift of policy for our most disadvantaged children and should help undo 30 years of damage to children from our most vulnerable families. More>>

ALSO:

Dope News: Binding Cannabis Referendum To Be Held At 2020 Election

The referendum on cannabis for personal use is part of Labour's confidence and supply agreement with the Greens. It could be one of potentially three referenda - decisions have yet to be made about euthanasia and changes to electoral laws. More>>

ALSO:

Vic: Victoria University Name Change Rejected

Education Minister Chris Hipkins has declined Victoria University of Wellington Council’s application for a legal name change. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Post-Cab 17/12/18: Chief Justice, M Bovis

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern's final post-cabinet press conference of the year focussed on announcing the appointment of Helen Winkelmann as the next Chief Justice, and an update on effort to eradicate Mycoplasma bovis from New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission Issues Paper: Use Of DNA In Criminal Investigations

In the 22 years since the Act came into force, it has become clear that the modern-day fingerprint analogy is increasingly inapt... Theoretically, whole genome sequencing could ultimately become the standard method of analysing a DNA sample. Such a development will give a new perspective on the concept of genetic surveillance in the criminal context. More>>

State Highways: $1.4 Billion For Road Safety Improvements

The Safe Network Programme will make 870 kilometres of high volume, high-risk State Highways safer by 2021 with improvements like median and side barriers, rumble strips, and shoulder widening. More>>

ALSO:

Dealing Crackdown, Addiction Support: Government Action On Synthetics

The NZ Drug Foundation has welcomed the Government’s response to synthetic drug deaths. The response strikes a balance between giving law enforcement the tools they need to target criminal networks and changing drug law to make it easier for people to access help when they need it. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels