Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Improving biosecurity top priority


Hon Damien O’Connor

Minister of Agriculture and Biosecurity


13 June 2018

MEDIA STATEMENT

Government is in line with primary sector industry leaders when it comes to biosecurity, says the Minister for Agriculture and Biosecurity Damien O’Connor.

The KPMG Agribusiness Agenda report, released today, reveals having a world class biosecurity system is top priority for the leaders surveyed.

“Biosecurity risks can threaten our economy and way of life. This Government understands that if we are to keep pace with the increasing levels of goods and people across our borders we need to step up our efforts in biosecurity.

“A pleasing result from the survey was a recognition from industry that biosecurity is everyone’s job and that everyone has a role to play in dealing with the risk.

“The strong partnership formed between industry and Government in the fight against Mycoplasma bovis has demonstrated that we can come together effectively when needed.

“But there’s plenty of work to do to improve our ability to respond effectively to major incursions. High on the list is improving compliance with the National Animal Identification and Tracing (NAIT) system, as we have seen throughout the Mycoplasma bovis response.

“Not enough farmers have been complying with NAIT, and there’s a growing understanding throughout the sector that this needs to change. This year I’ve accelerated a year-late report into the effectiveness of NAIT and have instructed my officials to make the appropriate improvements, including making it easier to use.

“To give biosecurity the attention it deserves, I’ve reorganised the Ministry for Primary Industries, to create Biosecurity New Zealand, a stand-alone unit whose sole focus is biosecurity.

“In addition, I’ve signalled that the Biosecurity Act is past its use-by date and needs a thorough review. The current Act gives us a solid foundation, but we need to make sure it is fit for purpose in a rapidly changing world.

“This is a big job and needs to be carefully considered with strong input from industry and the public. I expect it to begin after we have dealt with the Mycoplasma bovis threat.”

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The EU Trade Talks With NZ

In the very unlikely event that all will be smooth sailing in negotiating access to Europe for agricultural products from this part of the world, the EU/NZ negotiations could be wrapped up in about two years – which is relatively fast when it comes to these kind of deals. At best then, we won’t see any concrete benefits until half way through the next term of government.

There is however, a far more pressing trade problem facing this country, and Europe (via Malmstrom) is right at the centre of it. This involves the fate of our – and Europe’s – booming trade with Iran, which has been targeted with sweeping punitive sanctions by US President Donald Trump, and these are due to take effect on November 4. More>>

 

World Refugee Day: What 7 Former Refugee Kids Love About New Zealand

RASNZ asked 7 members of their specialist youth service (along with two staff members who work with refugee background youth) how they felt about New Zealand – and filmed the responses. More>>

ALSO:

DHBs: Nurses Plan Strike Action For Next Month

Nurses across the country have confirmed a notice of a 24-hour strike, starting on 5 July. District Health Boards (DHB) were working on contingency plans following a notice to strike by the New Zealand Nurses Organisation. More>>

ALSO:

Oranga Tamariki: Children's Ministry Shifts Away From Putting Kids In Care

Children's Minister Tracey Martin is signalling a shift away from putting children into care, and towards intensive intervention in a child's home. More>>

ALSO:

But No Way To Tell Why: Significant Drop In HIV Diagnoses

A new report shows that for the first time since 2011, the number of annual HIV diagnoses in New Zealand has fallen. But without funding for a repeat of ongoing surveys to monitor changes in behaviour, testing and attitudes, health workers can’t be sure what’s driving the decrease. More>>

ALSO:

On Her Majesty's Public Service: Inquiry Into Spying Claims Extended To All Govt Agencies

In March, State Services Commissioner Peter Hughes announced an inquiry after it was revealed the firm spied on Canterbury earthquake claimants for Southern Response. The inquiry was furthered widened to include the Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment, who had been spying on Greenpeace staff. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages