Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Climate change not so cool

Climate change not so cool

With temperatures high around the country, Associate Health Minister Julie Anne Genter has launched the Ministry of Health’s new Heat Health Plan Guidelines.

“Climate change is a big threat to our society, and we need to plan for anticipated weather like hotter days now,” says Ms Genter.

“Although it is great to enjoy the outdoors, getting too hot is a serious risk that will happen more in our future. Our health will be impacted by climate change, and we need to ensure we are all ready.

The number of days where temperature exceeds 25 degrees Celsius is expected to increase between 40 and 100 percent by 2040 and between 40 and 300 percent by 2090.

“Extreme heat can cause problems for everyone, but it can be especially concerning for babies and infants, pregnant women, older people, those with pre-existing medical conditions, and those with disabilities,” Ms Genter said.

“Every year we have older New Zealanders who die due to heat issues and this is projected to increase. Research shows that hospital admissions and deaths increase during periods of hot weather.

“I want us to all be aware of the impact the heat can have on vulnerable people, so be careful when taking Grandma to the beach.

“Climate change doesn’t just affect our health, it also has an impact on people’s productivity at work, the primary industries and our economy. This is an issue we all need to be thinking about.

“Having Heat Health Plan Guidelines will raise awareness and drive local action to counter the negative impact extreme temperatures can have on our health.

“These guidelines are aimed at helping health and community service providers, including local government, prepare their own plans dedicated to their community and their own predicted weather variations,” Ms Genter said.

Plans should be integrated with existing emergency response plans and include the four Rs of emergency management: reduction, readiness, response and recovery.

Other aspects to consider in any Heat Health plan include:
ensuring appropriate responses are ready for vulnerable populations in heatwaves
keeping buildings cool and shaded
taking long-term actions to reduce heat impacts such as urban planning, developing green spaces and reducing carbon emissions
setting appropriate staffing levels that take account of staff and client safety in hot weather
considering staff wellbeing (as well as clients) during an extreme heat event and providing training for staff on explaining risks of high heat to clients
incorporating heat events into communication strategies and business continuity service plans.

Notes: According to the Ministry for the Environment’s 2018 Climate Change Projections for New Zealand, the number of days over 25 degrees varies across the country. Hawke's Bay (27.5 days), Canterbury (27.3), Northland (24.5 days) and Gisborne (24.2 days) had the highest average number of days last year with maximum temperatures over 25 degrees.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The Hong Kong Protest Movement

Nearly ten weeks after the huge Hong Kong protests began, managing to still get 1.7 million people onto the streets in the rain is a testament to how strong the pro-democracy movement has become...

The pro-democracy protests enjoy huge support among Hong Kong’s youth, partly because the democratic systems currently at risk have only a limited time span. More>>

ALSO:

 
 

Welfare: More Measures To Help Those Facing Homelessness

Ministers have announced $54 million in Government funding for initiatives which will support at-risk individuals and whānau to stay in their existing tenancies. The funding will also provide additional wrap around services. More>>

ALSO:


Corrections: New Strategy On Māori Reoffending And imprisonment

Authentic co-design with Māori, incorporating a Te Ao Māori worldview, and greater connectedness with whānau are key elements of Hōkai Rangi, Corrections’ new departmental strategy designed to address the long-term challenge of Māori reoffending and imprisonment. More>>

ALSO:

Pacific Island Forum: Australia v Everyone Else On Climate Action

Traditionally, communiques capture the consensus reached at the meeting. In this case, the division on display between Australia and the Pacific meant the only commitment is to commission yet another report into what action needs to be taken. More>>

ALSO:

Unscoped Or Missed Damage: Resolution For Canterbury Owners Of On-Sold Homes

People with over-cap on-sold* properties in Canterbury can now apply for a Government payment so they can get on and repair their homes. More>>

ALSO:

Hamilton-Auckland: First Urban Growth Partnership Signed

New Zealand’s first urban growth partnership between the Government, local councils and mana whenua was signed at a meeting of mayors, chairs and ministers in Hampton Downs today. More>>

ALSO:

Vote On Action Next Week: Secondary Principals Walk From Negotiations

“Unfortunately we consider there is no further value in continuing negotiations at this point. The government has not been able to table an offer that will be acceptable to our members.” More>>

Patrol Car Stolen, Glocks Taken: Manhunt In Gore

The driver rammed the patrol car before fleeing on foot with Police chasing, also on foot. The man has then circled back around, stolen the patrol vehicle, which had the keys left in it, and rammed another Police car... Two Police-issued Glock pistols were stolen. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels