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Ministers prioritise consultation on climate change

Hon James Shaw
Minister for Climate Change
Hon Megan Woods

Minister of Energy and Resources

Hon Damien O’Connor

Minister of Agriculture

15 March 2019
PĀNUI PĀPĀHO
MEDIA STATEMENT


Changes to the Terms of Reference for the Interim Climate Change Committee will better prepare the Government to initiate meaningful change to key legislation, addressing the implications of our changing climate.

These changes were announced this morning by Minister for Climate Change James Shaw, Minister of Agriculture Damien O’Connor and Minister of Energy and Resources Megan Woods.

When the Interim Committee was established in April 2018 it was intended findings would be delivered to the Independent Climate Change Commission.

That permanent Commission is expected to be established later this year.

The changes announced today mean the Interim Committee will deliver its two key reports, one on agriculture and one on renewable electricity generation, directly to the Minister for Climate Change. This will allow the Government to consider the findings and act with necessary pace.

The Committee’s findings will be based on in-depth analysis conducted over the past year, including testing with iwi/Māori and relevant sector representatives.

“This is a step forward, enabling more time for focused consultation with New Zealanders on important climate change legislation proposals.

“We know timing is tight. This is because now is our best chance to take action. These changes will set the foundations for New Zealand to move forward on ways to tackle the impact of our changing climate,” says James Shaw.



Damien O’Connor says it’s essential to get right the gradual transition to more sustainable agriculture and ensure that production values are sustained.

“The agriculture sector plays a critical role in helping New Zealand meet its emissions reduction goals, but we need to focus on making the goal posts clear.

“Policy decisions around agriculture need to be based on scientific advice and consultation so the sector has well-considered, effective and – most importantly – workable solutions,” says Damien O’Connor.

Megan Woods says this year is important for New Zealand’s climate change decisions.

“Significant and detailed research carried out to date in the energy sector will set the foundations for moving us towards an affordable, renewable future.

“The Interim Committee’s findings will enable the Government to map out the next steps about how it can move into an energy future that’s built on greater renewables while ensuring affordability and security of supply,” says Minister Woods.

James Shaw says its important feedback on the Interim Climate Change Committee’s recommendations is sought from all New Zealanders, including from the primary sector.

“Our engagement on the Zero Carbon Bill and the NZ ETS has told us that certainty, direction and moving forward together towards a low emissions economy are what people want from us,” says Mr Shaw.

Notes to editors:

The Interim Committee was appointed in April 2018 to deliver advice on how New Zealand could transition to a low emissions energy future and 100 per cent renewable electricity by 2035 in a normal hydrological year.

The Interim Committee was asked to deliver advice on how agricultural methane and nitrous oxide emissions would be practically addressed in the New Zealand Emissions Trading Scheme (NZ ETS), if a decision was made to include them.

In June last year, the Interim Committee noted that the NZ ETS would be one of the key focuses of its work and that the Committee would consider a range of options to deliver emissions reductions.

The NZ ETS is currently New Zealand’s primary tool for reducing emissions and some farming landowners are already participating in it and taking advantage of tree planting to generate carbon credits.

ends

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