Parliament

Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | Video | Questions Of the Day | Search

 

Police Shouldn't Retire Just Because They're 55

Police Shouldn't Be Retired Just Because They're 55

Friday 3rd Sep 1999
Patricia Schnauer
Media Release -- Justice

Parliament is being asked to support an amendment to the Police Act that would reduce the discrimination against Police officers who are currently forced to retire once they turn 55.

Patricia Schnauer, ACT Spokesman for Police, said she will ask MPs when considering the Human Rights Amendment Bill (No. 2) at present before Parliament, to also approve an amendment to the Police Act.

Mrs Schnauer said it was absurd that the Police were now required to observe the Human Rights Act when employing someone, but that Government prevented them from doing so when it came to retiring that person.

"At the present time the Police Commissioner has the discretion to look at Human Rights matters in exercising his discretion to extend a member's service from year to year up to age 60.

"The problem is the Police Commissioner has interpreted the legislation narrowly, forcing many good sworn officers out of the force.

"Given the current bevy of high profile operational needs like APEC, the millennium celebrations and the America's Cup, not to mention particular criminal investigations or community activities, the recent loss of experienced senior staff through restructuring, and Government's recent need to provide extra sworn Police, there is good basis to retain any fit and able sworn member of Police.

"For every Police officer who is forced to retire earlier than they choose, the taxpayer is forced to incur unnecessary expenditure in training a replacement.

"Research indicates that the real "retirement" issue for New Zealand is being able to keep good and fit employees in the workforce to support the ageing population, not the ability to remove dead wood.

"The Commissioner will already know by means of required fitness tests and performance appraisals that the officer is fit and able to continue in the job, so all this amendment does is clarify for him that he must consider human rights issues in exercising his discretion to retain staff who want to stay on," said Patricia Schnauer. ENDS

For more information visit ACT online at http://www.act.org.nz or contact the ACT Parliamentary Office at act@parliament.govt.nz.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

CPAG Report: The Further Fraying Of The Welfare Safety Net

New Zealand’s welfare system has undergone a major transformation during the past three decades. This process has seriously thwarted the original intent of the system, which was to provide a decent standard of living for all New Zealanders in times of need...

In 2017 it is not unusual for families to be living in their cars, in garages, or in substandard boarding houses. Food banks are unable to meet the soaring demands from not only beneficiaries but, increasingly, the working poor. Private charities, such as KidsCan and Variety, are overwhelmed by the demand from poor families for basic necessities. More>>

ALSO:

 
 

Risks & Adaptation: Cheaper To Cut Emissions Than Deal With Climate Change

The cost of climate change to New Zealand is still unknown, but a group of experts tasked with plugging the country's information gaps says it will likely be significant and it would be cheaper to cut greenhouse emissions than simply adapting to those changes. More>>

ALSO:

BPS HYEFU WYSIWYG: Labour's Budget Plans, Families Package

“Today we are announcing the full details of the Government’s Families Package. This is paid for by rejecting National’s tax cuts and instead targeting spending at those who need it most. It will lift 88,000 children out of poverty by 2021." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Defence Spending, Alabama, And Dolly Parton

The spending lavished on Defence projects to meet the risks that could maybe, possibly, theoretically face New Zealand in future is breath-taking, given how successive governments have been reluctant to spend even a fraction of those amounts on the nation’s actual social needs. More>>

ALSO:

Members' Bills: End Of Life Choice Bill Passes First Reading

The End of Life Choice Bill in the name of David Seymour has been sent to a select committee for consideration by 76 votes to 44. It is the third time Parliament has voted on the issue in recent decades and the first time such a Bill has made it over the first hurdle. More>>

ALSO:

State Sector: MPI Survives Defrag Of Portfolios

The Ministry for Primary Industries will not be split under the new government, but will instead serve as an overarching body for four portfolio-based entities focused on fisheries, forestry, biosecurity and food safety. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages