Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Another Orange Roughy Fishery in Deep Trouble

Another Orange Roughy Fishery in deep trouble

Forest and Bird today deplored the dismal state of the Bay of Plenty orange roughy fishery after the latest research showed that current catches are over 30 times the estimated sustainable yield.

Society spokesperson, Barry Weeber, said the fishery had been reduced to between 10 and 15 percent of its original size.

"The Bay of Plenty fishery, which is NE of the Mercury Islands, only started in the mid 1990s."

Mr Weeber said that the current estimate of the fishery's sustainable yield was only 16 to 30 tonnes compared to the current annual catch limit of 1000 tonnes.

"Forest and Bird called for the suspension of orange roughy fishing in the Bay of Plenty."

Mr Weeber said deepwater fishing for orange roughy and other species is leaving a terrible legacy for the future. Fish nets are not only killing long-lived orange roughy but are severely damaging their marine habitat.

Mr Weeber said deep sea corals up to several metres high are being smashed by the trawl nets.

Mr Weeber said that while orange roughy have been aged at well over 100 years, these coral features removed by trawlers are even older. Gorgonian corals have been aged by NIWA at over 500 years and bamboo corals at over 300 years."

"It will take centuries, if not millennia, for the marine environment to recover from the impacts of trawling for orange roughy."

For further information contact: Barry Weeber (04)385-7374 or (025)622-7369 Background: The decline of Orange roughy fisheries

Orange roughy are considered to live to well over 100 years old and not start breeding till they are 23 to 29 years old. They are fished at depths of 700 to 1000m where they form dense spawning or feeding aggregations. These aggregations are often associated with seamounts, pinnacles or canyons. They are often caught in association with black and smooth oreos which are also long-lived.

The Sorry State of Orange Roughy Fisheries

Fishery % initial population left* Current trend Current catch limit (TACC) (tonnes) Estimated Current Annual Yield (tonnes) Challenger 3 Declining 1425 220 Northern unknown Declining 190 Unknown Northern - Bay of Plenty 10-15 Declining 1000 16 to 30

East Cape 14 Declining 2000 130 East Coast North Island 10 Declining 1261 770 NW Chatham Rise 21-44 Declining 2250 930-2600 NE & E Chatham Rise 17-21 Unclear 4950 incl Sth Rise 3400-4400

South Chatham Rise Unknown Declining catch rates 4950 incl NE & E Chatham R Unknown Puysegur 7 Unclear Closed 90-340 Southern Areas Unknown Declining? 5000 Unknown WC South Island 22 Unknown 430 200

* Footnote: 30% is the agreed minimum population size for NZ fisheries.

Review of Orange roughy stocks: ORH 1: Principally Bay of Plenty - the main fishery started in 1995. A trawl survey in 1998 noted a 95 percent decline in spawning population size. The previous Minister of Fisheries, John Luxton, refused to take action to reduce the catch limit. The fishing industry did not honour an agreement to carry out another trawl survey in 1999 to check on the stock size. A survey was finally undertaken in June. This was used in the current assessment which estimates the stock is between 10 and 16 percent of its unfished size. This is under half the minimum target size of 30 percent. The current catch limit is over 30 times the estimated sustainable yield. Action: The catch must be cut to the sustainable yield this year

ORH 2A (North): East Cape North Island - the main fishery started in 1994 but the most recent assessment indicates that this stock is now half the minimum target size of 30%. While a cut in the catch limit occurred in 1998 the previous Minister of Fisheries, John Luxton, did not take a decision in 1999 to further cut the catch limit. The industry has in the past opposed a staggered reduction in catch limits to prevent over-fishing. Action: Further cuts in catches must happen this year.

ORH 2A (South), 2B, 3B: East Coast North Island - this fishery started in the early 1980s and has reduced the stock to 10 percent of its unfished size. Current catches are above estimates of sustainable yield. Action: Further cuts in catches must happen this year.

ORH3B (Chatham Rise): North-east and Eastern end: This may once have been the world's largest orange roughy stock. The population has been reduced to around 17 percent of its unfished size in just under 20 years. Current catches are above some estimates of sustainable yield and it is unclear whether the stock is rebuilding. North-West: This population may or may not be above minimum sustainable limits. The assessment is highly uncertain and has not been updated for several years. Puysegur: This fishery was closed in 1998 after the stock had crashed to 7 percent of its unfished state after 8 years. The fishing industry are talking about opening this fishery in the next year. Auckland Islands and Antipodes: Recent evidence indicates these fisheries have been reduced to very low levels. Past catches were not sustainable but the former Minister of Fisheries refused to take action in the last 2 years to better control these small fisheries. Other areas: State or size of other southern populations are unknown. Action: Catch limits need reducing in southern areas.

ORH 7A (Challenger Plateau - West Coast South Island) - Fishing which started in the early 1980s has reduced this stock to 3 percent of its unfished state. Catch limits were reduced in 1998 when further concerns were raised as to whether the stock was rebuilding. Further reductions were supposed to happen in 1999 but the Minister of Fisheries, John Luxton, refused to put it on last year's sustainability round. Action: this fishery should be closed.

ORH 7B (West Coast South Island) - Fishing which started in the mid-1980s has reduced this stock to around 22 percent of its unfished size. Current catches are still above most estimates of sustainable yield.

Source: Most of the information on the state of orange roughy stocks is based on Stock Assessments reviewed by the May 2000 Ministry of Fisheries Stock Assessment Plenary and "Report of the Fishery Assessment Plenary, April 1999: stock assessments and yield estimates" compiled by Annala J H, Sullivan K J and O'Brien C J, Science policy Ministry of Fisheries, May 1999.

Barry Weeber Senior Researcher Royal Forest and Bird Protection Society PO Box 631 Wellington New Zealand Phone 64-4-385-7374 Fax 64-4-385-7373 www.forest-bird.org.nz

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Corrections Corrected: Supreme Court Rules On Release Dates

Corrections has always followed the lawful rulings of the Court in its calculation of sentence release dates. On four previous occasions, the Court of Appeal had upheld Corrections’ practices in calculating pre-sentence detention. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news