Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


CYFS And Corrections Unite Against Child Abuse

Child, Youth And Family And Corrections Unite Against Child Abuse


Child, Youth and Family and the Department of Corrections have signed an agreement aimed at further improving interagency co-operation especially in the reporting of child abuse and reducing re-offending.

The agreement outlines steps that must be followed by Corrections staff when they learn of or suspect child abuse or neglect.

The agreement also sets out procedures for Corrections and Child, Youth and Family to jointly manage the release from prison of offenders who have been convicted of sexual, violent or other serious offences against children and who seek family/whanau integration. This will enable the departments to work with families to ensure that adequate supports and monitoring systems are in place to help ensure children are kept safe.

Child, Youth and Family says it has been working with government agencies and professional organisations for a number of years on improving professional information sharing in relation to child abuse.

“We have had information sharing protocols in place for some time with a wide range of government departments and voluntary organisations, particularly in the health and education sectors,” says Chief Executive Jackie Brown.

The James Whakaruru report brought the importance of this work into the public spotlight.

“Since the release of the Whakaruru report we have signed protocols relating to the reporting of child abuse with the Department for Courts and now the Department of Corrections. Good progress is also being made in negotiations with the Royal NZ College of General Practitioners towards agreement on a referral process for GPs to report cases of suspected abuse to Child, Youth and Family.”

“We are sensing a real determination by all agencies and the community at large to ensure that no children fall through the cracks,” says Ms Brown.

Department of Corrections Chief Executive Mark Byers says Corrections is committed to reducing re-offending. This includes developing staff practices to break the cycle of child abuse and neglect and to promote a consistent and comprehensive approach to the protection and well being of children and young people.

“As a general overriding principle Corrections should immediately advise Child, Youth and Family or the police if we think a child or young person is in serious and imminent danger.”

The agreement between Child, Youth and Family and Corrections also focuses on permitted information sharing; children’s rights under the victims notification register; and case management relating to young offenders who are involved with both departments. It further states that the departments will co-operate at a policy, planning and operational level in such areas of mutual interest as family violence, youth offending, the prevention of child abuse, family reintegration and treatment of sexual abusers of children and young persons.

“Both departments acknowledge that the exchange of key information and better co-operation between them is in the best interests of children and young people. It will also assist the development of initiatives aimed at further reducing re-offending,” say Mr Byers and Ms Brown.


Media contacts:
Child, Youth and Family:
Stephen Ward, media advisor, 04-918-9124

Department of Corrections:
Mike Howson, communications advisor, 04-474-8843

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sector Opposes Bill: Local Government Bill Timeframe Extended

The Minister of Local Government Peseta Sam Lotu-Iiga has asked the Select Committee to extend the report back date for the Local Government Act 2002 Amendment Bill (No 2). More>>

ALSO:

Breed Laws Don’t Work: Vets On New National Dog Control Plan

It is pleasing therefore to see Louise Upston Associate Minister for Local Government calling for a comprehensive solution... However, relying on breed specific laws to manage dog aggression will not work. More>>

ALSO:

Not Waiting On Select Committee: Green Party Releases Medically-Assisted Dying Policy

“Adults with a terminal illness should have the right to choose a medically assisted death,” Green Party health spokesperson Kevin Hague said. “The Green Party does not support extending assisted dying to people who aren't terminally ill because we can’t be confident that this won't further marginalise the lives of people with disabilities." More>>

ALSO:

General Election Review: Changes To Electoral Act Introduced

More effective systems in polling places and earlier counting of advanced votes are on their way through proposed changes to our electoral laws, Justice Minister Amy Adams says. More>>

Gordon Campbell: On Our Posturing At The UN

In New York, Key basically took an old May 2 Washington Post article written by Barack Obama, recycled it back to the Americans, and still scored headlines here at home… We’ve had a double serving of this kind of comfort food. More>>

ALSO:

Treaty Settlements: Bills Delayed As NZ First Pulls Support

Ngāruahine, Te Atiawa and Taranaki are reeling today as they learnt that the third and final readings of each Iwi’s Historical Treaty Settlement Bills scheduled for this Friday, have been put in jeopardy by the actions of NZ First. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Damage De-Regulation Is Doing To Fisheries And Education, Plus Kate Tempest

Our faith in the benign workings of the market – and of the light-handed regulation that goes with it – has had a body count. Back in 1992, the free market friendly Health Safety and Employment Act gutted the labour inspectorate and turned forestry, mining and other workplace sites into death traps, long before the Pike River disaster. More>>

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news