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Audit Report On Mäori Language Resourcing

Te Puni Kökiri Announces Findings From Latest Audit Report On Mäori Language Resourcing

Today Te Puni Kökiri released the ‘Mäori Language Resourcing’ audit report which examined the use of funding allocated to the education sector for Mäori language resourcing in schools.

The Ministry of Education received $7 million (for the year ending June 2001) to commission the development of books and other resources.

In addition, $13.8 million was distributed directly to schools nationwide in 2000/2001 to support teaching and learning through te reo Mäori. Schools make their own decisions on how to use their funding allocation.

With over 22,000 students now receiving some of their education in te reo Mäori, the audit report found that the education sector is using the Mäori language resourcing for the purposes intended. However, while the quality and quantity of resources available has improved, more effective consultation between the education sector and the community would produce better tailored resources.

Chief executive Leith Comer says Mäori language resources need to meet both teacher and student needs.

“The challenge for the education system is to develop enough Mäori language learning materials to support the growing number of students studying the range of subjects now being taught in Mäori.

I believe that information and communication technology provides the sector with the opportunity to provide resources that better meet the needs of our rangatahi. Working together, everyone benefits,” says Mr Comer.

The recommendations from the report are attached.

ends


Recommendations

Resources produced for schools

- The Ministry of Education institute a systematic process for incorporating teachers’ and students’ needs, ideas and feedback into the development of resources;

- The Ministry of Education set aside funding to encourage new ideas;

- Curriculum statements be reviewed to ensure they meet the needs of all Mäori language teachers and learners;

- Curriculum statements in Mäori be supported with English-language translations;

- All resources be clearly graded and catalogued, so teachers know what is available and where it fits into curricula;

- The Ministry make more use of the internet as a cost-effective way of delivering resources, particularly to small areas or groups which have specific needs; and

- The Ministry review its professional development programmes so that they more closely match the release of new resources and the training needs of bilingual teachers.

Funding to schools for immersion teaching

- Schools be required to account annually to their communities on the use of funding for Mäori language teaching and learning; and

- Schools claiming funding for students at particular levels of immersion be monitored regularly to ensure that they are teaching at the immersion level claimed.

Questions and answers

Why was the audit on Mäori language resourcing commissioned?
The audit originated from concerns raised by the Education Review Office and Mäori language teachers about the adequacy of existing Mäori language learning and teaching resources - and the ability of those resources to support the Mäori language curriculum.

What were the objectives of the audit?
There were two objectives. The first objective was to examine the extent to which the two funding streams support Mäori language learning. The second objective was to assess the effectiveness of the Ministry’s support for Mäori language education.

Who was involved in the audit?
The audit limited its focus to schools offering Level 1 and 2 immersion programmes.

Mäori language teachers in 40 schools were interviewed. This represents 12% of those offering Level 1 and/or 2 immersion education.

In addition, questionnaires were sent to 316 schools offering Level 1 or 2 immersion – with 249 teachers returning the questionnaire.

The audit team reviewed documents from the Ministry of Education and the Education Review Office. The Ministry of Education provided further information and dialogue throughout the audit process.

What were the major conclusions from the audit?

Resources produced for schools
1. The quality and quantity of Mäori language resource materials has improved greatly in the last decade, but value for money will only be achieved if material is well matched to teachers’ and students’ needs.
2. The Ministry of Education is consulting more with classroom teachers when developing resources, but the process needs to be more comprehensive and systematic.
3. Good quality, and timely, professional development is necessary for teachers to get maximum benefit from resource materials
4. Some schools use the Internet effectively to share resources, but its potential hasn’t yet been fully recognised for delivering Mäori language support.

Funding to schools for immersion teaching

1. Most schools use the funding generated by Mäori language immersion students as it is intended - to support Mäori language learning.
2. Greater accountability to the school’s community would provide more assurance.
3. Delivering the $13.8 million targeted funding through the operations grant is a relatively efficient way of supporting immersion teaching and learning. However, more monitoring of this funding is recommended.

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