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Stop Leaky Buildings: Sack the Regulators

15 June 2005

Stop Leaky Buildings: Sack the Regulators

"The Auckland University Symposium on leaky buildings, to be held on the 18th and 19th of July is winding up to be yet another exchange of hot air and no doubt will completely miss the point as to why this monumental cock-up occurred in the first place." This was from Peter Osborne, a Libertarianz Spokesman and Auckland builder.

Professor Duffy of Auckland University says, "We are not looking for who's to blame. We need to cut a swathe through all the talk and dishonesty and get through this minefield to create a platform of truth so we can build solutions."

Osborne responds, "This sounds very encouraging as the number one contributors to the problem of leaky buildings are 'talk and dishonesty' -- the bulk of which has come from governments, both local and national, from regulatory authorities and government research associations, and from self-serving succubi like the Registered Master Builders and various building surveyors and self-anointed experts who have used the situation to elbow their way into a position of authority.

It has been these self-servers and power-mongers who have paved the way for this problem to occur in the first place. To make things worse, instead of buggering off now with their tails between their legs, they have seized the opportunity to tighten regulation even further."

"The first and most important move, if we are to have any hope of removing such problems from the building industry in the future, is to completely remove these inert nobodies from the debate and from our lives. Their motives are highly questionable and they have proven to be downright dictatorial and utterly inept.

Further, they are a huge burden financially to builders and home owners. It is their intrusion that has lulled people into a false sense of security, trusting that if consents have been inspected and passed that the owner's new home is up to scratch. The leaky building issue has shown that justice, in the form of compensation, to the unfortunate home owner has not been served and most likely never will be. So much for a safety net."

Osborne continues, "It is not by accident that this problem has affected so many new home owners in recent years. The issue of leaky buildings was almost unheard of during the villa and bungalow eras, yet these were built in times when technology was very basic and timber treatment was non-existent.

It is most important to note also, that these were times of zero regulation. This problem has been escalating in line with increasing regulation. Architects and draftsmen have been able to dodge their responsibilities if their plans have been accepted by the authorities.

Builders are also able to escape culpability if the inspections have been passed. This has muddied the waters and has left the home owner wondering who they can call to task when problems do occur."

He concludes, "Libertarianz call for the sacking of all jack-booted building regulators. What and how people choose to build on their own property is none of the state's business. The removal of this huge burden will allow people to invest in reputable architects, draftsmen and builders.

They would also understand that choosing their contractors carefully is a natural part of their own responsibility. The building industry is in a very bad way and will continue to deteriorate while we allow those who produce nothing to dictate the terms.

"It's Enough to Make you Vote Libertarianz!"

ENDS

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