Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Waikato Dog Thieves No Surprise To NZSOA

Waikato Dog Thieves No Surprise To NZSOA

The New Zealand Security Officers Association is not surprised that a gang of people have been able to masquerade as dog control officers, which has resulted in the theft of a number of pets in the Waikato region.

A spokesperson for the NZSOA said today, “Many people do not know their rights and responsibilities when dealing with enforcement officers who are empowered by local government. If people don’t know what to expect when dealing with council enforcement staff, it is inevitable that gangs of people such as the bogus dog control officers will be given free reign to operate.”

The Waikato Times recently reported that a gang of thieves had been stealing pets from residents while posing as dog control officers. There are believed to be using a white van and have been telling people that they are operating under the authority of the local council.

Council staff claim that dog control staff from each council wore uniforms and drove clearly marked vehicles. They also claimed that when pets are taken, seizure notices are left and that all staff wear name tags and carry photo identification cards.

Despite council claims, the NZSOA believe that there is confusion among the public regarding the role of council enforcement officers, citing the foolhardy actions of two noise control officers operating under the same legislation as dog control officers. In both these instances, the officers attending noise control complaints refused to produce identification to the members of the public they were dealing with.

In one of these cases, the refusal to produce such identification ended in the police shooting of a man in South Auckland.

Michael Ali'imatafitafi was shot three times by police last year after threatening them with a machete following a complaint of excessive noise. Michael Ali'imatafitafi's lawyer blamed the incident on a succession of bungles by police and the city council.

It is alleged that the noise control officer refused to produce a warrant of enforcement when Ali'imatafitafi’s father asked him to do so. Authority under noise control legislation emanates from a warrant of enforcement. The refusal of the noise control officer to produce this warrant nullified his authority to enforce noise control legislation.

In a similar incident that fortunately did not end in violence, Christchurch resident Andre Kaal was forced to hand over a New Zealand flag which had allegedly caused excess noise when the ropes attached to the flag were beating against the flagpole.

The noise control officer refused to show identification and Kaal, a former police officer and private investigator, said he would not remove the flag until he knew the identity of the noise control officer and the authority he was acting under. The noise control officer retreated to his car outside Kaal's home and called in the police.

A spokesperson for the NZSOA said, “It is crucial that local councils outline the rights and responsibilities of both the public and enforcement officers alike. This will help eliminate some of the confusion that is being experienced out there”.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Wealth: Two NZers Own More Than Poorest 30%

A staggering 28 per cent of all wealth created in New Zealand in 2017 went to the richest 1 per cent of Kiwis, while the 1.4 million people who make up the poorest 30 per cent of the population got barely 1 per cent, according to new research released by Oxfam.

The research also reveals that 90 per cent of New Zealand owns less than half the nation’s wealth.

The research forms part of a global report released to coincide with this week’s annual meeting of political and business leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. More>>

 

Employment: Joint Working Group On Pay Equity Principles Reconvened

Minister for Workplace Relations and Safety, Iain Lees-Galloway, and Minister for Women, Julie Anne Genter, are reconvening the Joint Working Group on Pay Equity Principles as the next step in pay equity for New Zealand women. More>>

ALSO:

Hapū: Prime Minister And Clarke Gayford Expecting First Child

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and her partner, Clarke Gayford, have announced that they are expecting their first child in June. “We’re both really happy. We wanted a family but weren’t sure it would happen for us, which has made this news unexpected but exciting." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: on the inquiry into the abuse of children in care

Apparently, PM Jacinda Ardern has chosen to exclude faith-based institutions from the government’s promised inquiry into the abuse of children in state care. Any role for religious institutions – eg the Catholic Church – would be only to observe and to learn from any revelations that arise from the inquiry’s self-limiting focus on state-run institutions… More >>


Gordon Campbell: On Jim Anderton
For anyone born after 1975, it is hard to grasp just how important a figure Jim Anderton was, for an entire generation.
During the mid to late 1980s, Anderton was the only significant public figure of resistance to the Labour government’s headlong embrace of Thatcherism...More>>

ALSO:


Gong Time: New Year's Honours List

Jacinda Ardern today congratulated the 179 New Zealanders named on the 2018 New Year’s Honours List. “Although this list was compiled and completed by the last government, it is a pleasure to welcome in the New Year by recognising exceptional New Zealanders,” Jacinda Ardern said. More
Full list

Roads: National launches bid to save highway projects

The National Party has launched a series of petitions aimed at saving regional highway projects at risk because of the Government’s obsession with Auckland trams…More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages