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Taking on Multinational Tobacco Co in New York

24 April 2006


MEDIA ADVISORY


Te Reo Marama in New York to take on World's Largest Multinational Tobacco Company


Altria Group, the parent company of Kraft, Philip Morris USA and Philip Morris International (PMI), the world's largest multinational tobacco company, has announced that it is considering breaking up into three separate companies in the near future.

Measured by units, 80 percent of Philip Morris' sales are outside of the United States. According to the World Health Organization, tobacco kills 5 million people annually worldwide; by 2025, the death toll is projected to double to 10 million annually, 70% in developing countries.

Decisions that an independent PMI makes will have major global public health ramifications. Organizations around the world are calling on PMI to make commitments - in advance of a breakup - to ensure that the separation of Philip Morris International and Philip Morris USA does not worsen the tobacco epidemic.

In solidarity with young people around the world who are being targeted by the company, over 100 youth and adults advocates from the United States will take their message to Altria's NYC headquarters on April 26 and Altria's shareholder meeting in East Hanover, New Jersey on April 27.

The group will be joined by Te Reo Marama Director Shane Bradbrook and Youth Advocate Skye Kimura.

The group will call on Philip Morris to "Give the World a Break" from:

* Tobacco advertising & misleading descriptors like "light" & "mild"
* Lobbying on Framework Convention on Tobacco Control implementation
* Lobbying against 100% smoke-free places
* Invoking trade agreements to challenge tobacco control legislation
* Tobacco smuggling
* Secrecy about advertising expenditures
* Secrecy about political contributions & lobbying costs
* Bogus "youth smoking prevention" programs
* Smoking & tobacco produce placement in movies and other media

Te Reo Marama Director will also take the opportunity to challenge the company about their exploitation of Maori language and imagery, with their "Maori Brand" cigarettes marketed in Israel last year.

Wednesday, April 26 What: Youth Action in Front of Altria's NYC Headquarters When: 12:30 - 1:30 pm Where: Altria Headquarters, 120 Park Ave, New York City, NY

ENDS

Maori in the Mix

Shane Bradbrook, Director, Te Reo Marama - Maori Smokefree Coalition


Last year a New Zealander living in Israel e-mailed Maori working in the Smokefree area, concerned about a new line of cigarettes being marketed Philip Morris. She explained in her e-mail that the packaging featured Maori designs. While she was a smoker herself, she was concerned about the way that Philip Morris was aligning Maori with a tobacco product.

The woman (who did not want to be involved in any publicity about the product) came home for a visit in December and brought a packet with her. More than simply featuring Maori designs, the cigarettes were called "Maori Mix". The packet featured quasi-Maori designs and a map of New Zealand on the back of the packet.

Smoking affects Maori more than any other group in New Zealand. It is the single biggest killer of Maori, and accounts for a third of all Maori deaths. This is reflected in higher rates of lung cancer, heart disease, SIDS, respiratory infections, glue ear, meningococcal disease and diabetes. Around half the Maori population smoke - this is way higher than any other group. As the indigenous people of the country we are also sensitive to the exploitation of our language and cultural symbols.

At Te Reo Marama we have also been talking the need to shift our communications focus away from smokers. Social marketing campaigns have tended to be smoker-focused; encouraging Maori smokers to quit. This is only part of the equation however. What we are dealing with is a powerful industry that targets our people, so at least some of our communications energy needs to be directed towards them.

The Maori Mix story gave us an opportunity to expose the industry. It also had all the elements of a news story - it was quirky and shocking; it was about New Zealand on the international stage; it was about Maori issues. TVOne ran the story during their 6pm bulletin on 12 December. TVOne's story was excellent. As well as covering the story itself, they explained how the industry has a history of using Maori imagery to promote its products - and included all of our key messages about Maori and smoking.

Over the next day we experienced unprecedented media coverage of the story in radio, television, and print media. Some of the themes that emerged during this coverage were:

* New Zealanders were very sympathetic to our concerns, and horrified at the exploitation of our language and imagery

* We were able to use a high profile and potentially negative story to focus on the plight of Maori and smoking; and generate sympathy from the public and decision makers

* Mainstream media - who can be notoriously anti-Maori - were our ally.

We received an immediate retraction and apology from Philip Morris, and we are considering whether we will take any further action.

Others indigenous communities were also appalled, and in the case of Native Americans and First Nations, they were reminded that indigenous peoples are constantly used by this industry to sell tobacco.

This is one response to the use of Maori Mix

"The Hopi Tribe located in the State of Arizona, United States recently passed a Tribal Resolution to ban smoking in tribal facilities and requires all smokers to smoke 50 feet away from these facilities. The State of Arizona is also introducing a state initiative to ban smoking in all public facilities and 50 feet away from these buildings.

I wanted to express my support for your actions where misuse of tribal symbols, identity, etc. is disregarded by major companies. We have had tribal religious sacred sites destroyed by non-Indian developers and companies. A Hopi religious symbol was used on a whiskey bottle which was blatant abuse of the sacredness we hold for this symbol in our society. The company's response was "if it is not protected by a trademark" it can be used by anyone for anything. In the dominant society, this is true.

We as indigenous people of the America's will continue to struggle against this attitude and misuse of our identity, symbols, etc. Please encourage your people that we are continuing our fight against such practices. Kwak'Khay (Thank you in the Hopi language)"


+++

Fact Sheet


Maori and smoking


* Tobacco is the single biggest killer of Maori. It accounts for a third of all Maori deaths.

* This is reflected in higher rates of lung cancer, heart disease, SIDS, respiratory infections, glue ear, meningococcal disease and diabetes.

* 47% of the Maori population smoke. The prevalence rate reduced 5% between 2004 and 2005.

* This means almost one in two Maori smoke, which compares with one in five for Europeans and others, and one in four for Pacific peoples.

* Maori prevalence is especially high in the 20-24 year old age group, with 59.1% of Maori in this age bracket smoking.

* In terms of young people the prevalence of smoking among Maori remains high compared to non-Maori, particularly in females. In 2004 the prevalence of year 10 female Maori (15-16 year olds) who smoked daily was 29.1%, compared to 16.2% for male Maori.

* Maori contribute around $260m in taxation from tobacco use and directly receive about $5-6m per annum for Maori tobacco control efforts.

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