Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Photo Essay: Education For Children In DR Congo

Photo essay on children living in the Democratic Republic of Congo to mark the launch of Save the Children's first global campaign: education for children in armed conflict zones.

Photographer: Marcus Bleasdale. Photos copyright of Save the Children and Marcus Bleasdale.

The campaign – and new name for it – will be launched in New Zealand by the Prime Minister at Parliament on the 13th September 4pm.

Save The Children
Logo

Providing education for children affected by armed conflict

Over two years since the official end of the war in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), an estimated 30,000 people continue to perish every month in conflict-related deaths. Over 4 million people have been displaced.

The physical abuse of civilians by the military continues largely unpunished, and children remain at high risk of use by armed groups, family separation and rape.

"We were tired of their attacks and the war," says Sifa, 15. "Children were dead. Parents were dead. There was no school. Everything was bad and in chaos. Instead of waiting to be exterminated, we thought it best to become active combatants. I was there for three years. My 'husband' was the first man I knew. I was eleven or twelve years old."

Award winning photographer, Marcus Bleasdale has been in the DRC for Save the Children photographing the effect of years of conflict on children like Sifa's lives, whether they have been forced to fight, have been displaced by conflict, sexually exploited or used as unpaid labour.

More than 50 million children around the world are affected by armed conflict. Education could turn their lives around but helping them is seen as the hardest challenge.

Save the Children is working to rebuild schools and the finance system to support education in the DRC. Schools provide children with a safe place to be, equips them with the skills to look after themselves and provides them with better prospects for their future.


Marcus Bleasdale captions

School for
Internally Displaced People (IDP) set up by UNICEF with 604
pupils
School for Internally Displaced People (IDP) set up by UNICEF with 604 pupils. At night the classrooms are used for new IDP's who are fleeing from the fighting in and around Gety. About 2000 now staying in the classrooms.

New arrivals and
new children are not registered for school yet and hang out
outside the classrooms
New arrivals and new children are not registered for school yet and hang out outside the classrooms during the day trying to pick up information and learn.

Imani Neema (7)
sweeping in Tchomia Camp.
Imani Neema (7) sweeping in Tchomia Camp.

Girls from Kotoni
Displaced camp collect firewood to sell in the camp in order
to pay for their school fees. Mbunia Ajiva 10 years, Ngave
Bazungai 9 years, and Ali Muchuna, 7
years.
Girls from Kotoni Displaced camp collect firewood to sell in the camp in order to pay for their school fees. Mbunia Ajiva 10 years, Ngave Bazungai 9 years, and Ali Muchuna, 7 years.

Francise Buswara
(7) and her brother Dany Rupiny (5). In the mobile hospital
in Bunia
Francise Buswara (7) and her brother Dany Rupiny (5). In the mobile hospital in Bunia. Francise had a leg infection when they fled from Bunia in 2003 and stayed in the bush with their grandmother. The wound became sceptic and one leg was removed. She goes to school in the hospital where teaching is provided onsite. She has learnt her vowels AEIOU and she is learning French. Their mother is in the mining town of Watsa with a new husband and so they are being taken care of by their grandmother.

Mapenzi Ngave (10)
from Kakado fled the fighting and now she is taking refuge
in Gety School in the Catholic mission
Mapenzi Ngave (10) from Kakado fled the fighting and now she is taking refuge in Gety School in the Catholic mission. She has never been to school as there is no money to pay the fees. Her mother has 9 children and it is impossible to pay for fees and food at the same time.

Children flee the
fighting in Bavi, Ituri and travel the 40km to Gety through
the forests
Children flee the fighting in Bavi, Ituri and travel the 40km to Gety through the forests. They bring what they can and they try to bring their school books if they have time to pack them. There will be no hope of an education for the 19,000 children who fled into Gety in the month of July 2006 for many months as the security situation will not allow it.

Soldiers stand by
as children flee the fighting in Bavi and Ituri to travel to
Gety.
Soldiers stand by as children flee the fighting in Bavi and Ituri to travel to Gety.

Mapuzi (12) and her
mother collect water outside the displaced camp in
Gety
Mapuzi (12) and her mother collect water outside the displaced camp in Gety. With her father dead her mother has no money to send her to school. She used to get sad when she saw the other children in the village go to school, but now no one can go because of the war.

Locals look at the
Save the Children posters distributed to find families who
were lost in the vast movement of people fleeing the
fighting.
Locals look at the Save the Children posters distributed to find families who were lost in the vast movement of people fleeing the fighting.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Vulnerable Kids, RNZ Funding, And Poppy

The decision to remove the word ‘vulnerable’ from the Ministry for Vulnerable Children could well mark a whole shift in approach to the care of children in need.

And I’m hedging with the ‘could well’ only because the Ardern government hasn’t yet spelled out whether the name change it has announced will also involve a rejection of the controversial use of Big Data to try and predict those children deemed to be at highest risk of inter-generational reliance on welfare support. More>>

 

Principals' Federation: End Of National Standards

Today the Minister of Education announced that the Government has stopped the controversial National Standards system of assessment and declared them an arbitrary measure which did not raise children's achievement as the previous Government intended. More>>

ALSO:

Public Good: People’s Report On Public Broadcasting And Media Presented

The People’s Commission on Public Broadcasting and Media, was crowdfunded and was informed by an extensive consultation, seeking the views of both those working in Media as well as gathering input both online and in person from ordinary Citizens. More>>

ALSO:

RBNZ To RNZB: PM's Press Conference

Prime Minister Jacinda Adern was joined by Minister of Finance Grant Robertson and Minister for Children Tracey Martin to announce the appointment of Adrian Orr as the new Governor of the Reserve Bank and the name change of the Ministry for Vulnerable Children to ‘Oranga Tamariki - Ministry for Children’. More>>

ALSO:

'Taming Globalised Capital': Why Is Labour Supporting Investment Rules In WTO?

‘Today, we learned the new government has added New Zealand’s name to a proposal designed to lead to foreign investment rules in the WTO at this week’s ministerial meeting in Argentina,’ said Auckland University Professor Jane Kelsey. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Politics Of Scaring Voters Back Into Line

Fear has always been a useful mobilising tool in politics… yet in 2017, bogeymen of all shapes and sizes seem to have fallen on hard times. For years, the National party had painted itself as being the only reliable defensive bastion against the terrifying prospect of a centre-left government… More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Drinking Water As A Failure Of Political Leadership

It is almost possible to feel sorry for the Health Ministry in their terrible, no good, very bad week... More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages