Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Contractors encouraged to use recycled aggregates


7th December 2006

Industry asks government to encourage contractors to use recycled aggregates such as glass in our roads

The Glass Packaging Forum has funded a cost benefit analysis which finds that the premium for processing aggregate with glass cullet over conventional mineral aggregate is around $2 per tonne but this extra cost isn’t recognised in most tenders.

An amended Transit road specification introduced this year now allows for up to 5% of glass cullet to be used in the base course for roading. This will help provide a local answer for many communities who find that the cost of sending glass back to Auckland for processing is often too high.

However at present this isn’t economically viable unless councils also include the potential cost of landfilling the glass into the equation. The introduction of sustainable construction targets could incentivise councils particularly on South Island to use glass cullet in local roads.

With around 5% more glass packaging recovered from homes year on year, New Zealand needs to find sustainable alternative recycling uses for its glass. To finance research and development into these, industry through the Glass Packaging Forum has established a voluntary levy on all those making, using or selling glass containers in New Zealand.

John Webber, General Manager of the Glass Packaging Forum says that using glass in roads is common around the world but in its infancy here and unless changes are made to the procurement practices, it will be difficult to encourage uptake.

“We have assisted two local communities in Palmerston North and Nelson with funds to trial crushing glass in a mix with traditional mineral aggregate and have subsequently commissioned a report to analyse the different production process and associated costs of each. This report shows that whether glass is crushed separately and mixed later with minerals or crushed together with minerals, the costs are broadly similar.

“The problem is that the premium for the glass cullet/ aggregate blended product over a conventional mineral aggregate is around $2 per tonne. This effectively means that using 5% glass cullet in the mix may cost up to 30% more if low cost stone is available.”

“With the aggregate industry now reporting a scarcity of stone in the Auckland region in particular, we believe that using glass from household recycling which cannot be used to make new glass because it has been contaminated during collection would make good sense.”

“And using glass locally in roads is economically viable if a whole of life approach is adopted. Whilst it costs more to use a glass blend rather than just minerals, if you factor in what it would cost to landfill recovered glass it is a much cheaper option overall.”

However Mr Webber says that the big question is who pays this premium:

“Road construction projects are highly competitive and contractors will always use the lowest cost product that complies with specification. We are encouraging the government to show leadership by placing a value on using sustainable aggregates so that glass recovered locally is utilized in local infrastructure.”

“One option could be to introduce a sustainable procurement policy along the lines of that enacted in California. The California Bill will require the California Department of Transportation to use recycled aggregates in state paving projects unless it is economically unfeasible.”

The Glass Packaging Forum was established to support and deliver on the objective, commitments and targets of the New Zealand Packaging Accord 2004. All members are levied according to how much glass they use making it the first large scale product stewardship initiative. Funds raised are available to assist local councils, recycling operators and communities develop commercially viable uses for recycled glass.

Ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Werewolf: What Does Winston Peters Want His Legacy To Be?

A lot of people in New Zealand seem to resent Winston Peters and the power that he appears to have. “Appears” being the operative word. In reality, Peters will have power only up to the point that he uses it.

By next week, he’ll have become just another junior player in an MMP governing arrangement, battling to hold onto the gains he was promised. More>>

 

Rising Toll: Road Safety Needs To Be A Higher Priority

Official advice released to the Green Party under the Official Information Act shows that the previous National Government dismissed an option to make road safety its most important transport priority after being told the road toll was rising. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Arrests At Blockade Of "Weapons Expo"

“We encourage people in Wellington to get down to the Westpac Stadium now for a day of awesome peace action. There will be plenty of food, music and activities to keep us sustained through the day.” More>>

ALSO:

Rorschach Restructuring: PSA Taking Inland Revenue To Court Over Psychometrics

The Public Service Association will be seeing Inland Revenue in Employment Court over its intention to psychometrically test employees reapplying for their roles at the department as part of its controversial Business Transformation restructuring plan. More>>

ALSO:

Nuclear Disarmament: Nobel Peace Prize 2017 Awarded To ICAN

Congratulations from iCAN Aotearoa New Zealand to international iCAN, the other iCAN national campaigns and partner organisations, and the countless organisations and individuals who have worked so hard for a nuclear weapons-free world since 1945. More>>

ALSO:

Expenses: Waikato DHB CEO Resigns

An independent inquiry has identified that Dr Murray had spent more than the agreed $25K allocated for relocation costs, and other unauthorized expenses involving potential financial breaches of the chief executive’s obligations. More>>

ALSO:

Wellington.Scoop: Sad About The Trolley Buses?

The Regional Council’s MetLink is today spending money to tell us that it really loves Wellington’s trolley buses, even though they’re all being taken off our roads by the end of this month. More>>

ALSO:

Post-Election: Preliminary Coalition Talks Begin

New Zealand First will hold post-election preliminary discussions in Wellington with the National Party tomorrow morning and the Labour Party tomorrow afternoon. More>>

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election