Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Self regulation protects advertisers not consumers

MEDIA RELEASE
21 December 2006

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Advertising self regulation protects advertisers not consumers

Bluebird Foods Ltd has agreed to withdraw an advertisement in which a nutritionist recommended potato crisps as suitable for school lunches following a complaint to the Advertising Standards Assn by the Obesity Action Coalition.

“The last thing parents need in the battle to get their kids eating well is a nutritionist on a TV ad telling kids chippies are OK for school lunches. We are pleased Bluebird has agreed to withdraw the advertisement,” says Celia Murphy of the Obesity Action Coalition. “OAC considered the ad to be irresponsible.”

“It is such a shame that people had to see the ad at all. It should never have been shown,” says Ms Murphy.

“I find it astonishing that anyone, and especially a nutritionist, would think it was all right to recommend chippies for school lunches. Chippies are very high in fat and salt and no stretch of the imagination could make them OK as a healthy everyday food. Chippies are party food not school food.”

“The ad undermined parents’ and teachers’best efforts to teach children about good healthy eating and the right place of treats in the diet. Many schools are getting rid of foods like chippies from their tuck shops to support classroom nutrition lessons.”

Advertising in New Zealand is controlled by the Advertising Standards Association, an industry-based organisation. “Self-regulation has been described as being akin to putting Dracula in charge of the blood bank.” says Ms Murphy. “Industry monitoring itself just doesn’t work. It does not provide enough protection for consumers.”

OAC believes the Advertising Standards Association fails consumers on a number of counts.

Among its failures is the fact that action is only taken to review an ad once a complaint has been made. This means that vulnerable consumers are always exposed to the irresponsible and misleading ads for some time before they are withdrawn. The ASA say that complaints are dealt with in about 24 days from the time they are received. So, at best, it is weeks before an offending ad is withdrawn.

”A misleading or irresponsible ad can be seen by a lot of people and do a lot of damage in that time. If no-one complains, the ad stays. If the process was really about protecting consumers any ad which was subject to a complaint would be stopped, pending enquiry as soon as a complaint has been received. Corrective advertising should also follow to ensure those who have been misled get the right information.”

“Many people have no idea they can complain and many of those who do, have little confidence in the system and don’t bother.”

OAC believes advertising should be regulated and managed by an independent agency to give consumers more protection.

“Parents get a pretty poor deal from those in the food and advertising industries who are quick to blame burgeoning childhood obesity on a lack of parental responsibility but continue to use the most persuasive marketing methods to tempt them to buy high fat, high sugar foods.” says Ms Murphy.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Commerce Commission: Retail Fuel "Not As Competitive As It Could Be"

The Commission has outlined some options it considers could improve competition. There are two broad sets of options it thinks may have the potential to help create a competitive wholesale market. These are:

• Greater contractual freedom to make it easier for resellers to switch between suppliers; and
• Enabling wider participation in the majors’ joint infrastructure, notably the shared terminals and supporting logistics involved in their borrow-and-loan system.
Further options, including improving the transparency of premium petrol prices, are discussed in the draft report. More>>

 

IPCA On 'Rawshark' Investigation: Multiple Police Failings In Hager Searches Confirmed

The Independent Police Conduct Authority has found that the Police's unlawful search of Nicky Hager's property in October 2014 resulted from an unwitting neglect of duty and did not amount to misconduct by any individual officer... More>>

ALSO:

Broadcasting Standards: Decisions On Coverage Of Mosque Attacks

The Authority upheld one of these complaints, finding that the use of extensive excerpts from the alleged attacker’s livestream video on Sky News New Zealand had the potential to cause significant distress to audiences in New Zealand, and particularly to the family and friends of victims, and the wider Muslim community. More>>

PM's Post-Cab: Bad Mail

Cabinet was updated on the process around prisoners sending mail, following the accused Christchurch gunman sending letters that "should have been stopped". All mail of "high concern prisoners" will now be checked by a specialist team and a changes to the legal criteria for witholding mail are expecting to go to a cabinet committee in this parliamentary session. More>>

Welfare: Ongoing Drug-Test Sanctions Contradicts Govt’s Rhetoric

Reports that two-thirds of beneficiaries who fail drug tests are still having their benefit sanctioned contradicts the Government’s so-called health approach to drugs. More>>

ALSO:

Welfare: More Measures To Help Those Facing Homelessness

Ministers have announced $54 million in Government funding for initiatives which will support at-risk individuals and whānau to stay in their existing tenancies. The funding will also provide additional wrap around services. More>>

ALSO:

Corrections: New Strategy On Māori Reoffending And imprisonment

Authentic co-design with Māori, incorporating a Te Ao Māori worldview, and greater connectedness with whānau are key elements of Hōkai Rangi, Corrections’ new departmental strategy designed to address the long-term challenge of Māori reoffending and imprisonment. More>>

ALSO:

Pacific Island Forum: Australia v Everyone Else On Climate Action

Traditionally, communiques capture the consensus reached at the meeting. In this case, the division on display between Australia and the Pacific meant the only commitment is to commission yet another report into what action needs to be taken. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels