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Wellington Youth Explore Cross-Cultural Conflict


19th April 2007

MEDIA RELEASE

Wellington Youth To Explore Cross-Cultural Conflict Through Creative Arts

Deputy Mayor Alick Shaw at the Centre for Global Action conference room (2nd floor James Smith Building) will officially launch The Babel Project, a creative-arts-based, cross-cultural exploration for youth, on Saturday 21 April.
A Peace Foundation project supported by the Wellington City Council, The Human Rights Commission, Arts Access, and many local business’. Babel is being facilitated by Katrina Baylis (Associate Director of the Peace Foundation Wellington Office, and TV personality from “Insiders Guide” and “Karaoke High”) who is of Palestinian background, and Tal Rogoff of Israeli background.

Katrina and Tal will use their experience as young people from opposite sides of a serious conflict to facilitate an exploration of the forces that push people apart and consider practical approaches to building a peaceful, multicultural and interfaith community.

A six month collaboration, The Babel Project will involve a group of Wellington youth aged 15-30, from varied ethnic backgrounds including Somali, Maori, Greek, Thai, Chinese, Colombian, Austrian, Samoan, Indian, Welsh and Anglo.

“Participants will examine the realities of people living on different sides of current inter-ethnic or inter-religious conflicts and the impact this has on the lives of youth in Wellington” says Ms Baylis.

As part of building Wellington’s future as a tolerant, diverse and multi-cultural society, conflict resolution approaches and reconciliation possibilities will be explored. Participants will use different artistic techniques and modes of expression, including painting, sculpture, film, photography, sketching, collage and writing.

The process will culminate in a creative art and photographic exhibition in September. Participants will also be encouraged to share their experiences in their own schools and communities, with the aim of encouraging and increasing the number of multicultural audiences that will visit the exhibition.

A documentary film is being produced as part of the process, mentored by Robin Greenberg and involving Suite One films.

The Babel Project is part of a growing series of arts based, cross-cultural communication, and conflict resolution and awareness programmes being developed and implemented by the Peace Foundation Wellington Office.


Katrina Baylis
Assistant Director/Youth Outreach Coordinator
Peace Foundation
Level 2, James Smith Building, 49-55 Cuba Street
Wellington
03 4969629
021607676.

'We see the world not as it is, but as we are.'
~Anais Nin

FORUMS

When:
• 9am SHARP to 5pm with afternoon tea and lunch provided.

Where:
• Meeting Rooms Level 2, James Smith Building
• 49-55 Cuba Street Wellington
• (Opposite Burger King and Body Shop).

FORUM ONE 21st April
• Active listening
• Cultural identities
• Participants and their stories/identities
• Multiculturalism
• Nationality
• Race
• Human Rights
• Global citizenship
• New Zealand, Wellington.

Speakers
• Global Education Centre
• Arts Access

• Feedback and discussion


FORUM TWO May 6th
• Palestinian/Israeli crisis
• Lessons, questions and similarities it raises.
• The ‘other’
• Media portrayals
• Stereotypes
• Cross cultural bridge building
• Conflict resolution.

Speakers
• Amnesty International
• Wellington City Council

• Feedback and discussion


FORUM THREE May 26th
• Colonialism
• Indigenous issues
• Living in New Zealand and relating to the Maori, how do we ‘fit in’?
• Arts practice and business
• Networking info
• Funding
• Art and the audience
• Individual projects discussed
• Exhibition feel.
• Money matters
• Other matters

Speakers
• Ray Ahipene-Mercer WCC Councillor and artist
• Sonya Yee, Access Radio Project Manager and Artist
• Dr Alice Te Punga Somerville, Professor of English, Indigenous Writing and Literature at Victoria University.

• Feedback
• Evaluation forms completed.

BABEL ARTISTS TO DATE
SUMMARY


RA SAVAGE photography/painting
Maori
Aged 24 Female

Wants to gain insight into some current global issues and then to contribute. Looking forward to working with a group of people on topics of race relations.
Hopes Wellington will embrace the different cultures settling into New Zealand and will lead the way by example.
“We need to show the rest of New Zealand that a multicultural community is a beautiful thing”

Ko Putauaki taku maunga
Ko Ohinemataroa taku awa
Ko Mataatua taku waka
Ko Ngatiawa taku iwi
Ko Ngatihikakino taku hapu
Ko Puawairua taku marae

Ko Ra Savage taku ingoa.


My mum Cammy was a beautiful 19 year old hippy single mum who took me around the country with her to wherever she got primary school teaching jobs - from Mt Maunganui to Takaka to Kutarere….until she met my stepfather Kenneth Robert and they got married and took 5 year old me on their 10 month honeymoon around the world, before returning to the idyllic Ohiwa Harbour and building their dream house and having 5 more babies – George, Ngarangikahiwa, Toi, Harry and Bay.

I dislike pink and yellow and frills and most things girly.....but do have a wee fetish for little retro ‘indigenous’ dolls.

My birth father Alyn was a singing dancing 20 year old hippy with long blonde hair and a huge shaggy beard who trained as a kindergarten teacher, spent a few years travelling the country in the Peace Van taking Peace education to primary schools…..and then in the 1990’s he won a position working for the Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy at the United Nations in NYC and has been an activist in a suit ever since. But he still teaches Peace in primary schools when he gets the chance.

Despite my parents being such free spirits I am pretty boring and conservative.
When people ask me how old I am, I always have to think a second before I remember….I am 24 but at times I feel far too old and wise (and cynical), and at others I feel ridiculously young and naïve and wonder if I will ever be a grown up? Sometimes this is a good thing….and sometimes it’s not.

I love jandals. If I could, I would wear them all day every day.
I fall in love with every place in which I spend time, Wellington, New York, Sydney, Cuernavaca in Mexico, Cochin in India, Ohope beach…..which means I tend to move a lot…and am always missing someone and somewhere.

But I still think that Ohiwa, Ohope and the East Coast are the most beautiful places I have ever seen.

My best friends are scattered all over the world at the moment:
Jo in Hagi, Japan
Lauren in Sale, Australia
Lourdes and Russ and Hope in New York
Bonnie travelling around Europe and South America
But thankfully Ange and Janine and Rachelle are still here in Wellington.

One of my favourite things in the world is walking bare foot on silky night time summer sand....

I often get terrified that I am not going to have time to do all the things I want to do in life as there is so much I want to learn and achieve….on the other hand I reckon I’m going to have a pretty interesting retirement.

I once belly danced in front of a crowd of 300

I write lists – short-term/mid-term/long-term goals lists, countries I will visit lists, movies I need to watch lists, books I have to read lists, things I need to buy lists, types of dancing/martial art/cooking styles that I want to learn lists…..

Then I lose them.

I have worked as a fish and chip girl, a photo developer, a pharmacy assistant, a bartender at Molly Malones Irish bar, a lingerie sales girl, a waitress at an Indian restaurant, a house painter, a legal receptionist/admin assistant, a tour guide….pretty much everything except supermarket checkout girl.
I do not like cats or dogs.
Cats and dogs love me.
After a lifetime of proclaiming that love was just a chemical imbalance, a theory devised by mankind in a vain attempt to differentiate themselves from animals….I have just fallen in love.

I only feel pretty if I’m in fancy dress...

I am extremely cynical….and yet, I still want to buy every single thing I see advertised on infomercials - TurboJam, Winsor Pilates, Magic Bullet, Youthful Essence, Proactive, Thin Lizzie, Ginsu Knife Set with free knife block if you call in the next 10 minutes…..

Fortunately I don’t have a credit card.

I love painting and photography and poetry and sculpture and sewing and baking and basically just creating things with my hands….but for some reason I always cringe when someone calls me an artist.

EDUCATION
Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi
BMVA – Bachelor of Maori Visual Art (first year) 2006

Victoria University of Wellington 2004

Whakatane High School
NZHSC/NZUE 1999

EXPERIENCE
2006 Enrolled at Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi in first year of a Bachelor of Art and Visual Culture/Te Toi Whakarei Paetahi

2006 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Paratiki selected

2005 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Conditional Nude selected, wins Best Maori Theme Award

2000 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Two works selected, Hope and Despair

1999 Bursary Painting 85%

1998 Part of a 3 person team that designed and worked on a collaborative mosaic commissioned by the Whakatane District Council – the mosaic is currently part of the landscaping in the surrounds of the Whakatane District Council buildings.


Paratiki, 2006
Acrylic on canvas

ARTY PAPAGEORGIOU Film/Documentary
Aged 18
Greek male

Hey all I’m Arty.

I have lived in Wellington most of my life but I have also lived in London and Melbourne (both cities I love).

I proudly attended Scots College (Primary) and Wellington College (Secondary). At secondary school I studied a variety of subjects including Japanese, Classics and Latin. I enjoyed playing rugby and cricket, for the infamous 3“b” Social Team. If anyone played this frightening team they would remember. Other great things I was heavily involved in at school last year were Stage Challenge and Senior Drama.

Currently I am studying Philosophy, Film, Media Studies and Law at Victoria University.

But . . . what I really love are movies. Although I am kept busy with school and a few social things I try to watch 4 or 5 films a week. My favourite types of films are the 1930 Gangster films. I especially enjoy those with James Cagney (e.g. Angels with Dirty Faces). Cagney knew how to rock it! P.S. I can’t wait for Grindhouse.

My other interests include Public Speaking, both New Zealand Speech Board exams and the occasional competition. I enjoy many types of music, but especially reggae and hip – hop. My favourite band is the ‘Mean Buzz’ (soon to change their name though, I think). I love kickin’ it friends and miss my mates who left Wellington this year.


“I have heard first hand accounts to great atrocities from hot spots around the world; hearing these people my own age with similar interests talking about such matters was not only moving but inspiring. It has instigated a real interest concerning a variety of global matters.
Being a teenager from an ethnic minority in Wellington is not always easy. I think this project will allow me an insight into how others in similar situations think and feel, and from this obtain an array of viewpoints on the best way for cultures to become fully integrated.
Wellington already has a vast amount of cultures and perhaps it could lead the way to the acceptance and assimilation of these cultures in New Zealand. The multi cultural character could assist Wellingtonian’s to be more accepting of cultures and create opportunities to celebrate the different cultures. “

Deputy Head Prefect 2006
English Speaking Union International Public speaking 2006
Wellington College Cultural person of the year 2006
United Nations National Speech Competition 2005

Work Experience
Good Mornings teen panel 2006
Cloud Nine Productions-“Revelations” 2002
Cloud Nine Productions “The Tribe” 1 & 2 1998-2001

BETHAN PARKER Painting
Aged 28
Welsh Female

“I see global issues as being something that affects everyone: racism, environment, fear and poverty. I do not fully understand all of these but increasingly have had to look at my own life, how they relate to me, how my actions relate to others and how I fit in as an individual in a new country (My family are all in the UK).

“I am interested in exploring / dispelling the fear that seems to be created around differences, especially with religion and ethnicity. I get frustrated with difference being a ‘bad’ thing. It seems that people are often kept or make themselves separate from each other according to their ethnicity which is something seen in both a community and global scale. I suppose without going into too much my main interest is in people and how global issues translate to, and have an effect on individuals and communities (even when the event is a long way away)”.
Wellington multi-cultural character will play an important part in the future. Due to the small population of NZ multi-culturalism and working with the rest of the world is essential. Having been through the immigration process, I have a better understanding of the cross culture debate: how some New Zealander’s feel about immigration from experiences I have had in the UK, being a new migrant and the need for immigration to meet job / qualification shortages and create a diverse community.

For the people of the Wellington region I think that increasingly, all cultures will become better understood and accepted. NZ is still a new country but one with a very open mind. This is part of what makes living here so exciting. Hopefully, as tolerance, acceptance and understanding become mainstream attitudes, more respect and equality will be created towards some of the communities that are marginalized at the moment.”
I have been living in NZ for 2 ½ years, mostly within the Wellington region. Although I was born in Wales, I have lived most of my life in / around Bristol (South West England).

Since graduating University I have travelled and had various jobs. I trained as a teacher but this was never really a passion. I love children and working with people and at the time it seemed like a good way to work around the world. Just before I left England I got involved in an outreach programme, buddying younger teenagers (often young parents and those with housing / homelessness issues). I worked for a youth housing organisation and had my eyes opened to a lot of different attitudes and the realities that many people face. I really loved doing this kind of work as I felt I was making a difference.

I am currently studying for The Learning Connexion’s Diploma in Art and Creativity and work part time for both the DARE foundation and Kids 4 Drama. My weeks are filled with a newly found passion for painting and drawing (although there never seems to be enough time!) For DARE I liaise with schools / community groups to recruit volunteers and get courses in life and parenting skills happening across Wellington. For Kids 4 Drama I tutor drama classes a few hours a week.

As a younger child I was involved in amateur drama groups. This became lesser as I went through college although I did take some Theatre Studies papers at Uni. At school I loved art, music, drama and writing but unfortunately had to choose between these in year 9. I chose Drama and after this decided I was no good at art and needn’t bother trying to do it. I am learning this does not have to be the case (as long as you enjoy it!) and have one more term of foundation level before starting Stage 1 at TLC J


NATALIA PARRA-SIERRA Fine Art
Aged 28
Colombian female


Looking for ways to promote cultural activities between Colombia and New Zealand.
Interested in educational, poverty and food matters globally.
Interested in helping children, especially multi-ethnic to adopt the country they are living in to assimilate, educate against ignorance and social problems.

“I am an Artist from Bogotá, Colombia, South America, who is also a New Zealand citizen. I have had a number of exhibitions in New Zealand and Colombia, including participating the first "Crossover" exhibition (Organised by Wellington City Council), the "Global Eye" exhibition (Organised by the Department of Conservation) and I also curated an exhibition of Wellington based Latin-American artists at the Wellington Arts Centre. A sample of my work and additional information about me can be found at:”

I was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, South America, and I am a dual Colombian and New Zealand citizen. I am the middle sister of 3 daughters, both of my parents were educators in the public sector, and they are both semi-retired now. I attended the same school from age eight until 17, and it was a school with an experimental educational ideology. I consider my school friends to be members of my extended family. The 1980's and 1990's were a difficult period for Colombia and the Colombian people, because of the complex civil unrest and conflict between the government and the various drug cartels. Even though this didn't directly affect my family, or me it was still a very tense and dangerous time to live. However we were determined that life go on as normal, and I spent a lot of time in the countryside, walking from farm to farm with groups of friends and other children, and it was still safe to walk around the city streets in the evenings.

I started studying Social Science in one of the public universities, in 1996, however I realised that this wasn't my thing, and in 1997, I started to study towards a degree in fine arts, in a private university. After finishing the first three semesters, I left Colombia to live in Helsinki, Finland for a year, on a cultural exchange, where I worked teaching art in a school for disabled children.

I returned to Colombia in 1999, to continue my studies in fine art, and I graduated in 2002. Later that year, I went to New Zealand to live, and I had a number of exhibitions in Wellington. I returned to Colombia in 2005, and I had a successful solo exhibition in Bogotá, and I worked children in an impoverished area of the city. The situation in Colombia has changed, but there are still many signs of violence. Although the drug cartels have been eliminated, the violence between the government, illegal Para-military groups (many of which are financed or supported by politicians), guerrillas and marginalized groups continues to destabilize society. US funded attempts to eradicate the drug trade has lead to a higher level of violence, as most of the aid from the United States is in the form of weapons and other military equipment.

I am currently a full time artist, experimenting with the amalgamation of painting with printmaking. My current works explores everyday life, and the movement of people in city environments.
_____________________

http://artistadecolombia.blogspot.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natalia_Karenka_Parra_Sierra
http://www.artelista.com/id-english/autor.php?a=7082706275144619

SAMUEL FITZGERALD Photography/Film
Aged 28
Anglo New Zealand

Sam recently returned to New Zealand after teaching English in Japan and working on the Japanese NGP/PNO Peace boat.
He is interested in issues of cultural identity and Wellingtons culture and it’s people. With his overseas experience he is interested in meeting new artists and exploring issues he has encountered on his travels.

“Only recently returning to New Zealand after a few years spent overseas, I am relatively new to Wellington. I was born in Christchurch but grew up in some of New Zealand’s more remote areas including Nightcaps in Southland, Collingwood in Golden Bay and Ruakaka in Northland. I studied at Canterbury University before leaving Aotearoa shores to live and work in Melbourne and then in the northern reaches of Tokyo. I spent three years in Japan working mostly as an English teacher, but also spent a lot of time visiting temples, eating sashimi, taking photos, toasting the fleeting cherry blossoms, scouring Shibuya’s fantastic record stores, and among other things, riding everywhere on an old bicycle with a shopping-basket and a bell. Tokyo, itself a captivating place to live, also provided me the opportunity to make several extended visits through South-East Asia; a region I now love. Most recently I was working for a Japanese non-governmental / non-profit organization called Peace boat. Peace boat works to promote peace, human rights, equal and sustainable development and respect for the environment. It does so primarily through the chartering of a passenger ship that travels the world on peace voyages. I was onboard for the duration of their 55th global voyage. A keen art student through to bursary level at school, time spent painting and sculpting took a back seat when I entered university to study international relations and history. Whilst living and travelling overseas I discovered a passion for photography, and also garnered an interest in film production, having had the chance to work with a top independent filmmaker from Tokyo. I have a strong interest in exploring the concepts of identity and multiculturalism in contemporary New Zealand society and look forward to any conclusions reached, or important questions raised, during the Babel Project forums. Working on such an ambitious project with such a diverse and talented group of people is an exciting prospect, and one I am really looking forward to.”


ROSE CLOUD ANNEAU Painting
Aged 30
Anglo/French New Zealand

“I am interested in the feasibility of peace and would like to be part of the dialogue
[I expect to gain] Peace, enjoyment, art, creative empowerment.
The world is culturally diverse I don’t see why Wellington cannot reflect that in the people it attracts and the planning the city embraces.
Multi-culturalism can open up new insights and peaceful ways of being and dialoguing with each other. Working out how we can create open forums for healing to take place.”

"As a student of art: I make art to investigate my relationship with wonder, expressing the joy of making and the possibility of inspiring others."
I believe in peace with my whole heart.
I believe we welcome peace via truthfully embracing our divisions accepting ourselves, acknowledging our fears of the unknown and each other. As we lay down our weapons of mistrust, greed and falsity we embrace the preciousness of our shared humanity.”

JONATHAN CAMERON Painting/Sculpture
Aged 17
Pakeha


ABOUT JONATHAN CAMERON: I’m currently in the seventh form at Tawa College studying Painting/Printmaking, Design, Photography and English. In 2006 I decided that since I love art so much and want to do it as a career I should get a “head start” and start getting my name and my artwork out into the community. Throughout 2006 and the beginning of 2007 I have been working on a “fashion” series. This idea came from a painting that I did for a competition (through school) where the theme was “teenage issues.” I chose anorexia as an issue because in 2005 through school debates and speeches this topic came up a lot, and for these speeches and debates I had done a bit of research on the topic and therefore was interested in the issue. Through the fashion series I was experimenting with beautiful (UNREALISTIC) images that the media pushes in today’s society. I haven’t exhibited in many places yet, two pieces of my work (from the fashion series) has been in the Christmas show at the ‘upstairs gallery’ at ‘Arts Frames’ (Kenepuru, PORIRUA) but didn’t sell, and three pieces was exhibited in Webster’s gallery in Kilbernie (again these works did not sell; the gallery curator’s have told me that they love my work, there just wasn’t the right people – and enough foot traffic).
At the moment I am looking around to see which places I could approach in regards to exhibiting some of my fashion series. I am also working on a piece that I designed for the PORIRUA festival of the elements student programme (this programme never happened and I was told this after coming up with a design, SO I am doing the painting any way. Ill put this on the website soon.)


PEOPLE WHO HAVE INFLUENCED MY ARTWORK, AND HELPED ME ALONG THE WAY:

 My family – ALWAYS supportive of me and my artwork.
 Marie Ross – Painting/Printmaking, and Design teacher at Tawa College. (Also this is who gave me information about BABLE project.)
 Rachel Clark – Photography teacher at Tawa College (and gave me the critical advice needed in producing the ‘anorexia’ painting for the “youth issues” competition.)
 Annette Kotsapas – “Artist mentor.” Given me critical advice in regards to “outside school” works, and in regards to exhibiting, and my artwork in the business world.

- I come from a "STOCK STANDARD" middle-class European New Zealand family. I've had an interest in art from a very young age. (Like I said in the other document) - I decided last year that if I want to do art for the rest of my life and even become a successful artist in the future then I should start getting my name out into the community (HENCE - fashion exhibition). The Babel project interested me because I saw it as a great opportunity for a young artist with high goals for the future like myself, and also because I am rather opinionated and have chosen the theme of politics (Maori and pakeha in particular) for painting and printmaking at school this year I felt that the Babel project would open my mind to some new thoughts and really influence on my work at school, and even develop this theme into something more stronger.

- I have also just completed a painting on the treaty of Waitangi and the elements, which was originally for a youth programme with the porirua arts council. After calling the organiser in January 2007 (WE WERE MEANT TO SPEND A DAY ON THE PAINTING AT THE FESTIVAL OF THE ELEMENTS IN PORIRUA, ON WAITANGI DAY) I found out that I was the only student who had shown any interest in doing the programme, and for that reason they had canceled the project. Since I had already came up with a design the organiser tried to make it happen for me but in the end it didn't work out; SO I have done the painting anyway and it is pretty much finished (I just have a few touch ups to do but will send it to you anyway for the web site, and I would be interested in hearing what you think about it.)


PACHALI BREWSTER Photography/Writing
Aged 20
Thai/Pakeha

Pachali is interested in Globalism, world peace, human rights and justice.
“I am interested in the similarities and differences between cultures and how they co-exist or conflict, different world views presenting different perspectives, and cultural reflectivity”

ALEYNA MARTINEZ Graphics/Painting
Aged 20
Asian/Euro


My name is Aleyna Martinez, I am born in Malaysia and moved here when I was two. Mostly I grew up in New Zealand, but at the same time, vaguely know what it is to be from Malaysia.
Malaysia is a country made of three dominant cultures, Malay, Chinese and Indian.
I mother is Indian and my father is Chineese, Phillipino and Spanish. However, I can’t speak any of these languages, just English.
I am studying Journalism at Whitireia Polytechnic.
My main passions are in the arts and music and so are people.
Growing up in New Zealand I have been able to experience other cultures and have good friends who are from many different places.
I’m looking forward to participating in the Babel Projects because it will deal with Issues that I am interested in and I’m looking forward to talking to other people about these issues to find what I think fits into the picture!!

FUAD FARAH Film/Documentary
Aged 22
Somali


“I am interested in US foreign policy, Iraq and the powerlessness of the UN. I want t meet a lot of different people and discover the barriers between different cultures. I hope one day we will all put our differences aside”

CECE CHU Painting
Aged 17
Chinese


“BECAUSE I am a Chinese immigrant myself, I am very interested in issues that surround different ethnicities and cultures. From this project I would like to produce work that would raise awareness and promote diversity within our society. I feel this will play an important part in the development of the city because f the increasing amount of immigrants and mixed families in NZ. We nee to embrace the different cultures, leading to a society where not only people are excepted but feel accepted as well.”
Cece was born in Fuzhou, China. She moved Auckland with her parents in 1995. In this beautiful country she found herself with a window of opportunities, and a younger brother in 2000. Her family soon moved to Wellington in 2003.
She is now a 17-year old student at Onslow College. Her chosen subjects are Art-painting, Graphics, Statistics, English and Economics. Art, painting and Graphics being her favourites. Being Chinese and having parents both working in the area, she has great interest in global and local issues surrounding different ethnicities.
Through this project, she looks forward to exploring both global/local issues and her artistic side to produce artworks that promote ethnic diversity and understanding.

LUCINDA REN Typography/Painting
Aged 16
Chinese


“I’d like to see peoples views on global issues and also learn more about them. I treasure and adore Wellington because it is so multicultural, even walking down the streets with he different shops. It makes the city an even more interesting and amazing place to be. We need to inform the people of Wellington about different cultures and countries.”


MAREIKURA TAKIRI WHAKATAKA_BRIGHTWELL Film
Aged 23
Maori male

OUR DOCUMENTARY TEAM.

EMMA CULLEN Editing/Film
Aged 23
Pakeha


“I am interested in the treatment of non-heterosexual people in countries where this is not accepted. How immigrants of non-heterosexual backgrounds when entering countries that accept this way of life assimilate and cope.
Wellington’s strength is in its multicultural side as the diversity of people makes the city so interesting. Wellington could become more open-minded and accepting if it paid more attention to those on its fringes, rather than those already established.”

STEPHEN WHITING FILM
Aged 28
Pakeha/ Austrian


ROHAN SATYANAND Film
Indian/Kiwi
Has attended the Avalon Film and Television school, and attained a BA from Victoria University. He is a freelance camera operator, technician, producer, editor and director. He has worked in television business, on projects from large-scale multicamera live broadcasts, to his own independent short films. Toloa and he have recently set up Suite One Films, a production company, and are currently working on several broadcast projects and corporate videos.
Rohan has Indo-Fijian and Pakeha heritage, and has travelled extensively through Asia and both American continents. He believes that truth and understanding are our best weapons against ignorance, the source of so many of our world's problems.
The Babel Project is a positive step towards increasing that cross-cultural understanding. Rohan is looking forward to the challenge of doing justice to such an important venture on screen.

TOLOA PETAIA Film
Samoan/Tokelauan
Also studied at the Film and TV school and has been involved in a number of television projects since. He freelances in the grip, camera and lighting departments on a range of shoots, from big-budget drama projects for international audiences, to event coverage and outside broadcasts. As well as being experienced behind a camera, Toloa is a talented sound recordist and editor. Rohan and he are currently working on several projects together under the name Suite One Films.
Of Tokelauan descent, Toloa is interested in Polynesian cultures in the New Zealand community and loves to travel in the Pacific Islands. Jesus Christ “You shall love your neighbour as yourself” sums a personal belief up best.
The essence of this ethos is echoed in the objectives of the Babel Project and the message has never been more critical than in today's global situation.


ROBIN GREENBERG
American
MENTOR FOR DOCUMENTARY

CAMERON BURNELL Photographer
23 Years Old

Grew up in Tai Tokerau (The far north of NZ)
7th Generation Pakeha
Favourite quote:

"Freedom is something you assume and wait for someone to take it from you.
The degree to which you resist is the degree to which you are free."
UTAH PHILLIPS

Something that I am immensely proud of, as a New Zealander is who we are.
Wherever we come from or whatever we look like we are all here on this little piece of beautiful land, growing and learning together. What ever our differences are we are all kiwis.

4 years ago I began studying photography at Mel Philips School of photography www.photoschool.com
Since then I have worked as a freelance photographer working in the Wellington region.
My passion lies in documentary photography. I've always loved any medium, which tells stories through images.


The Babel Project is to be launched this Saturday, to begin a six-month project that will take 14 youth from various ethnicities on a journey of exploration. Some of the issues that will be discussed include, multiculturalism, cultural relations, nations, identity, indigenous populations, conflict, self and identity, in a Wellington, New Zealand and International context. The Palestinian/Israeli crisis will also be used to discuss these issues facilitated by an Israeli and Palestinian. An art exhibition, Photographic exhibition and Documentary will result. We invite those interested to attend the opening, and if you would like to view the process in the forums, please contact me on 021607676, or using this email address.

best wishes

Katrina Baylis

19th April 2007

MEDIA RELEASE

WELLINGTON YOUTH TO EXPLORE CROSS-CULTURAL CONFLICT THROUGH CREATIVE ARTS

Deputy Mayor Alick Shaw at the Centre for Global Action conference room (2nd floor James Smith Building) will officially launch The Babel Project, a creative-arts-based, cross-cultural exploration for youth, on Saturday 21 April.
A Peace Foundation project supported by the Wellington City Council, The Human Rights Commission, Arts Access, and many local business’. Babel is being facilitated by Katrina Baylis (Associate Director of the Peace Foundation Wellington Office, and TV personality from “Insiders Guide” and “Karaoke High”) who is of Palestinian background, and Tal Rogoff of Israeli background.

Katrina and Tal will use their experience as young people from opposite sides of a serious conflict to facilitate an exploration of the forces that push people apart and consider practical approaches to building a peaceful, multicultural and interfaith community.

A six month collaboration, The Babel Project will involve a group of Wellington youth aged 15-30, from varied ethnic backgrounds including Somali, Maori, Greek, Thai, Chinese, Colombian, Austrian, Samoan, Indian, Welsh and Anglo.

“Participants will examine the realities of people living on different sides of current inter-ethnic or inter-religious conflicts and the impact this has on the lives of youth in Wellington” says Ms Baylis.

As part of building Wellington’s future as a tolerant, diverse and multi-cultural society, conflict resolution approaches and reconciliation possibilities will be explored. Participants will use different artistic techniques and modes of expression, including painting, sculpture, film, photography, sketching, collage and writing.

The process will culminate in a creative art and photographic exhibition in September. Participants will also be encouraged to share their experiences in their own schools and communities, with the aim of encouraging and increasing the number of multicultural audiences that will visit the exhibition.

A documentary film is being produced as part of the process, mentored by Robin Greenberg and involving Suite One films.

The Babel Project is part of a growing series of arts based, cross-cultural communication, and conflict resolution and awareness programmes being developed and implemented by the Peace Foundation Wellington Office.

For additional information please contact Katrina Baylis Assistant Director/Youth Outreach Coordinator, Peace Foundation, Level 2, James Smith Building, 49-55 Cuba Street
Wellington 03 4969629 / 021607676.


Katrina Baylis
Assistant Director/Youth Outreach Coordinator
Peace Foundation
Level 2, James Smith Building, 49-55 Cuba Street
Wellington
03 4969629
021607676.

'We see the world not as it is, but as we are.'
~Anais Nin

FORUMS

When:
• 9am SHARP to 5pm with afternoon tea and lunch provided.

Where:
• Meeting Rooms Level 2, James Smith Building
• 49-55 Cuba Street Wellington
• (Opposite Burger King and Body Shop).

FORUM ONE 21st April
• Active listening
• Cultural identities
• Participants and their stories/identities
• Multiculturalism
• Nationality
• Race
• Human Rights
• Global citizenship
• New Zealand, Wellington.

Speakers
• Global Education Centre
• Arts Access

• Feedback and discussion


FORUM TWO May 6th
• Palestinian/Israeli crisis
• Lessons, questions and similarities it raises.
• The ‘other’
• Media portrayals
• Stereotypes
• Cross cultural bridge building
• Conflict resolution.

Speakers
• Amnesty International
• Wellington City Council

• Feedback and discussion


FORUM THREE May 26th
• Colonialism
• Indigenous issues
• Living in New Zealand and relating to the Maori, how do we ‘fit in’?
• Arts practice and business
• Networking info
• Funding
• Art and the audience
• Individual projects discussed
• Exhibition feel.
• Money matters
• Other matters

Speakers
• Ray Ahipene-Mercer WCC Councillor and artist
• Sonya Yee, Access Radio Project Manager and Artist
• Dr Alice Te Punga Somerville, Professor of English, Indigenous Writing and Literature at Victoria University.

• Feedback
• Evaluation forms completed.

BABEL ARTISTS TO DATE
SUMMARY


RA SAVAGE photography/painting
Maori
Aged 24 Female

Wants to gain insight into some current global issues and then to contribute. Looking forward to working with a group of people on topics of race relations.
Hopes Wellington will embrace the different cultures settling into New Zealand and will lead the way by example.
“We need to show the rest of New Zealand that a multicultural community is a beautiful thing”

Ko Putauaki taku maunga
Ko Ohinemataroa taku awa
Ko Mataatua taku waka
Ko Ngatiawa taku iwi
Ko Ngatihikakino taku hapu
Ko Puawairua taku marae

Ko Ra Savage taku ingoa.


My mum Cammy was a beautiful 19 year old hippy single mum who took me around the country with her to wherever she got primary school teaching jobs - from Mt Maunganui to Takaka to Kutarere….until she met my stepfather Kenneth Robert and they got married and took 5 year old me on their 10 month honeymoon around the world, before returning to the idyllic Ohiwa Harbour and building their dream house and having 5 more babies – George, Ngarangikahiwa, Toi, Harry and Bay.

I dislike pink and yellow and frills and most things girly.....but do have a wee fetish for little retro ‘indigenous’ dolls.

My birth father Alyn was a singing dancing 20 year old hippy with long blonde hair and a huge shaggy beard who trained as a kindergarten teacher, spent a few years travelling the country in the Peace Van taking Peace education to primary schools…..and then in the 1990’s he won a position working for the Lawyers Committee on Nuclear Policy at the United Nations in NYC and has been an activist in a suit ever since. But he still teaches Peace in primary schools when he gets the chance.

Despite my parents being such free spirits I am pretty boring and conservative.
When people ask me how old I am, I always have to think a second before I remember….I am 24 but at times I feel far too old and wise (and cynical), and at others I feel ridiculously young and naïve and wonder if I will ever be a grown up? Sometimes this is a good thing….and sometimes it’s not.

I love jandals. If I could, I would wear them all day every day.
I fall in love with every place in which I spend time, Wellington, New York, Sydney, Cuernavaca in Mexico, Cochin in India, Ohope beach…..which means I tend to move a lot…and am always missing someone and somewhere.

But I still think that Ohiwa, Ohope and the East Coast are the most beautiful places I have ever seen.

My best friends are scattered all over the world at the moment:
Jo in Hagi, Japan
Lauren in Sale, Australia
Lourdes and Russ and Hope in New York
Bonnie travelling around Europe and South America
But thankfully Ange and Janine and Rachelle are still here in Wellington.

One of my favourite things in the world is walking bare foot on silky night time summer sand....

I often get terrified that I am not going to have time to do all the things I want to do in life as there is so much I want to learn and achieve….on the other hand I reckon I’m going to have a pretty interesting retirement.

I once belly danced in front of a crowd of 300

I write lists – short-term/mid-term/long-term goals lists, countries I will visit lists, movies I need to watch lists, books I have to read lists, things I need to buy lists, types of dancing/martial art/cooking styles that I want to learn lists…..

Then I lose them.

I have worked as a fish and chip girl, a photo developer, a pharmacy assistant, a bartender at Molly Malones Irish bar, a lingerie sales girl, a waitress at an Indian restaurant, a house painter, a legal receptionist/admin assistant, a tour guide….pretty much everything except supermarket checkout girl.
I do not like cats or dogs.
Cats and dogs love me.
After a lifetime of proclaiming that love was just a chemical imbalance, a theory devised by mankind in a vain attempt to differentiate themselves from animals….I have just fallen in love.

I only feel pretty if I’m in fancy dress...

I am extremely cynical….and yet, I still want to buy every single thing I see advertised on infomercials - TurboJam, Winsor Pilates, Magic Bullet, Youthful Essence, Proactive, Thin Lizzie, Ginsu Knife Set with free knife block if you call in the next 10 minutes…..

Fortunately I don’t have a credit card.

I love painting and photography and poetry and sculpture and sewing and baking and basically just creating things with my hands….but for some reason I always cringe when someone calls me an artist.

EDUCATION
Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi
BMVA – Bachelor of Maori Visual Art (first year) 2006

Victoria University of Wellington 2004

Whakatane High School
NZHSC/NZUE 1999

EXPERIENCE
2006 Enrolled at Te Whare Wananga o Awanuiarangi in first year of a Bachelor of Art and Visual Culture/Te Toi Whakarei Paetahi

2006 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Paratiki selected

2005 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Conditional Nude selected, wins Best Maori Theme Award

2000 Molly Morpeth Canaday Art Exhibition
Two works selected, Hope and Despair

1999 Bursary Painting 85%

1998 Part of a 3 person team that designed and worked on a collaborative mosaic commissioned by the Whakatane District Council – the mosaic is currently part of the landscaping in the surrounds of the Whakatane District Council buildings.

ends


Paratiki, 2006
Acrylic on canvas

ARTY PAPAGEORGIOU Film/Documentary
Aged 18
Greek male

Hey all I’m Arty.

I have lived in Wellington most of my life but I have also lived in London and Melbourne (both cities I love).

I proudly attended Scots College (Primary) and Wellington College (Secondary). At secondary school I studied a variety of subjects including Japanese, Classics and Latin. I enjoyed playing rugby and cricket, for the infamous 3“b” Social Team. If anyone played this frightening team they would remember. Other great things I was heavily involved in at school last year were Stage Challenge and Senior Drama.

Currently I am studying Philosophy, Film, Media Studies and Law at Victoria University.

But . . . what I really love are movies. Although I am kept busy with school and a few social things I try to watch 4 or 5 films a week. My favourite types of films are the 1930 Gangster films. I especially enjoy those with James Cagney (e.g. Angels with Dirty Faces). Cagney knew how to rock it! P.S. I can’t wait for Grindhouse.

My other interests include Public Speaking, both New Zealand Speech Board exams and the occasional competition. I enjoy many types of music, but especially reggae and hip – hop. My favourite band is the ‘Mean Buzz’ (soon to change their name though, I think). I love kickin’ it friends and miss my mates who left Wellington this year.


“I have heard first hand accounts to great atrocities from hot spots around the world; hearing these people my own age with similar interests talking about such matters was not only moving but inspiring. It has instigated a real interest concerning a variety of global matters.
Being a teenager from an ethnic minority in Wellington is not always easy. I think this project will allow me an insight into how others in similar situations think and feel, and from this obtain an array of viewpoints on the best way for cultures to become fully integrated.
Wellington already has a vast amount of cultures and perhaps it could lead the way to the acceptance and assimilation of these cultures in New Zealand. The multi cultural character could assist Wellingtonian’s to be more accepting of cultures and create opportunities to celebrate the different cultures. “

Deputy Head Prefect 2006
English Speaking Union International Public speaking 2006
Wellington College Cultural person of the year 2006
United Nations National Speech Competition 2005

Work Experience
Good Mornings teen panel 2006
Cloud Nine Productions-“Revelations” 2002
Cloud Nine Productions “The Tribe” 1 & 2 1998-2001

BETHAN PARKER Painting
Aged 28
Welsh Female

“I see global issues as being something that affects everyone: racism, environment, fear and poverty. I do not fully understand all of these but increasingly have had to look at my own life, how they relate to me, how my actions relate to others and how I fit in as an individual in a new country (My family are all in the UK).

“I am interested in exploring / dispelling the fear that seems to be created around differences, especially with religion and ethnicity. I get frustrated with difference being a ‘bad’ thing. It seems that people are often kept or make themselves separate from each other according to their ethnicity which is something seen in both a community and global scale. I suppose without going into too much my main interest is in people and how global issues translate to, and have an effect on individuals and communities (even when the event is a long way away)”.
Wellington multi-cultural character will play an important part in the future. Due to the small population of NZ multi-culturalism and working with the rest of the world is essential. Having been through the immigration process, I have a better understanding of the cross culture debate: how some New Zealander’s feel about immigration from experiences I have had in the UK, being a new migrant and the need for immigration to meet job / qualification shortages and create a diverse community.

For the people of the Wellington region I think that increasingly, all cultures will become better understood and accepted. NZ is still a new country but one with a very open mind. This is part of what makes living here so exciting. Hopefully, as tolerance, acceptance and understanding become mainstream attitudes, more respect and equality will be created towards some of the communities that are marginalized at the moment.”
I have been living in NZ for 2 ½ years, mostly within the Wellington region. Although I was born in Wales, I have lived most of my life in / around Bristol (South West England).

Since graduating University I have travelled and had various jobs. I trained as a teacher but this was never really a passion. I love children and working with people and at the time it seemed like a good way to work around the world. Just before I left England I got involved in an outreach programme, buddying younger teenagers (often young parents and those with housing / homelessness issues). I worked for a youth housing organisation and had my eyes opened to a lot of different attitudes and the realities that many people face. I really loved doing this kind of work as I felt I was making a difference.

I am currently studying for The Learning Connexion’s Diploma in Art and Creativity and work part time for both the DARE foundation and Kids 4 Drama. My weeks are filled with a newly found passion for painting and drawing (although there never seems to be enough time!) For DARE I liaise with schools / community groups to recruit volunteers and get courses in life and parenting skills happening across Wellington. For Kids 4 Drama I tutor drama classes a few hours a week.

As a younger child I was involved in amateur drama groups. This became lesser as I went through college although I did take some Theatre Studies papers at Uni. At school I loved art, music, drama and writing but unfortunately had to choose between these in year 9. I chose Drama and after this decided I was no good at art and needn’t bother trying to do it. I am learning this does not have to be the case (as long as you enjoy it!) and have one more term of foundation level before starting Stage 1 at TLC J


NATALIA PARRA-SIERRA Fine Art
Aged 28
Colombian female


Looking for ways to promote cultural activities between Colombia and New Zealand.
Interested in educational, poverty and food matters globally.
Interested in helping children, especially multi-ethnic to adopt the country they are living in to assimilate, educate against ignorance and social problems.

“I am an Artist from Bogotá, Colombia, South America, who is also a New Zealand citizen. I have had a number of exhibitions in New Zealand and Colombia, including participating the first "Crossover" exhibition (Organised by Wellington City Council), the "Global Eye" exhibition (Organised by the Department of Conservation) and I also curated an exhibition of Wellington based Latin-American artists at the Wellington Arts Centre. A sample of my work and additional information about me can be found at:”

I was born and raised in Bogotá, Colombia, South America, and I am a dual Colombian and New Zealand citizen. I am the middle sister of 3 daughters, both of my parents were educators in the public sector, and they are both semi-retired now. I attended the same school from age eight until 17, and it was a school with an experimental educational ideology. I consider my school friends to be members of my extended family. The 1980's and 1990's were a difficult period for Colombia and the Colombian people, because of the complex civil unrest and conflict between the government and the various drug cartels. Even though this didn't directly affect my family, or me it was still a very tense and dangerous time to live. However we were determined that life go on as normal, and I spent a lot of time in the countryside, walking from farm to farm with groups of friends and other children, and it was still safe to walk around the city streets in the evenings.

I started studying Social Science in one of the public universities, in 1996, however I realised that this wasn't my thing, and in 1997, I started to study towards a degree in fine arts, in a private university. After finishing the first three semesters, I left Colombia to live in Helsinki, Finland for a year, on a cultural exchange, where I worked teaching art in a school for disabled children.

I returned to Colombia in 1999, to continue my studies in fine art, and I graduated in 2002. Later that year, I went to New Zealand to live, and I had a number of exhibitions in Wellington. I returned to Colombia in 2005, and I had a successful solo exhibition in Bogotá, and I worked children in an impoverished area of the city. The situation in Colombia has changed, but there are still many signs of violence. Although the drug cartels have been eliminated, the violence between the government, illegal Para-military groups (many of which are financed or supported by politicians), guerrillas and marginalized groups continues to destabilize society. US funded attempts to eradicate the drug trade has lead to a higher level of violence, as most of the aid from the United States is in the form of weapons and other military equipment.

I am currently a full time artist, experimenting with the amalgamation of painting with printmaking. My current works explores everyday life, and the movement of people in city environments.
_____________________

http://artistadecolombia.blogspot.com
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natalia_Karenka_Parra_Sierra
http://www.artelista.com/id-english/autor.php?a=7082706275144619

SAMUEL FITZGERALD Photography/Film
Aged 28
Anglo New Zealand

Sam recently returned to New Zealand after teaching English in Japan and working on the Japanese NGP/PNO Peace boat.
He is interested in issues of cultural identity and Wellingtons culture and it’s people. With his overseas experience he is interested in meeting new artists and exploring issues he has encountered on his travels.

“Only recently returning to New Zealand after a few years spent overseas, I am relatively new to Wellington. I was born in Christchurch but grew up in some of New Zealand’s more remote areas including Nightcaps in Southland, Collingwood in Golden Bay and Ruakaka in Northland. I studied at Canterbury University before leaving Aotearoa shores to live and work in Melbourne and then in the northern reaches of Tokyo. I spent three years in Japan working mostly as an English teacher, but also spent a lot of time visiting temples, eating sashimi, taking photos, toasting the fleeting cherry blossoms, scouring Shibuya’s fantastic record stores, and among other things, riding everywhere on an old bicycle with a shopping-basket and a bell. Tokyo, itself a captivating place to live, also provided me the opportunity to make several extended visits through South-East Asia; a region I now love. Most recently I was working for a Japanese non-governmental / non-profit organization called Peace boat. Peace boat works to promote peace, human rights, equal and sustainable development and respect for the environment. It does so primarily through the chartering of a passenger ship that travels the world on peace voyages. I was onboard for the duration of their 55th global voyage. A keen art student through to bursary level at school, time spent painting and sculpting took a back seat when I entered university to study international relations and history. Whilst living and travelling overseas I discovered a passion for photography, and also garnered an interest in film production, having had the chance to work with a top independent filmmaker from Tokyo. I have a strong interest in exploring the concepts of identity and multiculturalism in contemporary New Zealand society and look forward to any conclusions reached, or important questions raised, during the Babel Project forums. Working on such an ambitious project with such a diverse and talented group of people is an exciting prospect, and one I am really looking forward to.”


ROSE CLOUD ANNEAU Painting
Aged 30
Anglo/French New Zealand

“I am interested in the feasibility of peace and would like to be part of the dialogue
[I expect to gain] Peace, enjoyment, art, creative empowerment.
The world is culturally diverse I don’t see why Wellington cannot reflect that in the people it attracts and the planning the city embraces.
Multi-culturalism can open up new insights and peaceful ways of being and dialoguing with each other. Working out how we can create open forums for healing to take place.”

"As a student of art: I make art to investigate my relationship with wonder, expressing the joy of making and the possibility of inspiring others."
I believe in peace with my whole heart.
I believe we welcome peace via truthfully embracing our divisions accepting ourselves, acknowledging our fears of the unknown and each other. As we lay down our weapons of mistrust, greed and falsity we embrace the preciousness of our shared humanity.”

JONATHAN CAMERON Painting/Sculpture
Aged 17
Pakeha


ABOUT JONATHAN CAMERON: I’m currently in the seventh form at Tawa College studying Painting/Printmaking, Design, Photography and English. In 2006 I decided that since I love art so much and want to do it as a career I should get a “head start” and start getting my name and my artwork out into the community. Throughout 2006 and the beginning of 2007 I have been working on a “fashion” series. This idea came from a painting that I did for a competition (through school) where the theme was “teenage issues.” I chose anorexia as an issue because in 2005 through school debates and speeches this topic came up a lot, and for these speeches and debates I had done a bit of research on the topic and therefore was interested in the issue. Through the fashion series I was experimenting with beautiful (UNREALISTIC) images that the media pushes in today’s society. I haven’t exhibited in many places yet, two pieces of my work (from the fashion series) has been in the Christmas show at the ‘upstairs gallery’ at ‘Arts Frames’ (Kenepuru, PORIRUA) but didn’t sell, and three pieces was exhibited in Webster’s gallery in Kilbernie (again these works did not sell; the gallery curator’s have told me that they love my work, there just wasn’t the right people – and enough foot traffic).
At the moment I am looking around to see which places I could approach in regards to exhibiting some of my fashion series. I am also working on a piece that I designed for the PORIRUA festival of the elements student programme (this programme never happened and I was told this after coming up with a design, SO I am doing the painting any way. Ill put this on the website soon.)


PEOPLE WHO HAVE INFLUENCED MY ARTWORK, AND HELPED ME ALONG THE WAY:

 My family – ALWAYS supportive of me and my artwork.
 Marie Ross – Painting/Printmaking, and Design teacher at Tawa College. (Also this is who gave me information about BABLE project.)
 Rachel Clark – Photography teacher at Tawa College (and gave me the critical advice needed in producing the ‘anorexia’ painting for the “youth issues” competition.)
 Annette Kotsapas – “Artist mentor.” Given me critical advice in regards to “outside school” works, and in regards to exhibiting, and my artwork in the business world.

- I come from a "STOCK STANDARD" middle-class European New Zealand family. I've had an interest in art from a very young age. (Like I said in the other document) - I decided last year that if I want to do art for the rest of my life and even become a successful artist in the future then I should start getting my name out into the community (HENCE - fashion exhibition). The Babel project interested me because I saw it as a great opportunity for a young artist with high goals for the future like myself, and also because I am rather opinionated and have chosen the theme of politics (Maori and pakeha in particular) for painting and printmaking at school this year I felt that the Babel project would open my mind to some new thoughts and really influence on my work at school, and even develop this theme into something more stronger.

- I have also just completed a painting on the treaty of Waitangi and the elements, which was originally for a youth programme with the porirua arts council. After calling the organiser in January 2007 (WE WERE MEANT TO SPEND A DAY ON THE PAINTING AT THE FESTIVAL OF THE ELEMENTS IN PORIRUA, ON WAITANGI DAY) I found out that I was the only student who had shown any interest in doing the programme, and for that reason they had canceled the project. Since I had already came up with a design the organiser tried to make it happen for me but in the end it didn't work out; SO I have done the painting anyway and it is pretty much finished (I just have a few touch ups to do but will send it to you anyway for the web site, and I would be interested in hearing what you think about it.)


PACHALI BREWSTER Photography/Writing
Aged 20
Thai/Pakeha

Pachali is interested in Globalism, world peace, human rights and justice.
“I am interested in the similarities and differences between cultures and how they co-exist or conflict, different world views presenting different perspectives, and cultural reflectivity”

ALEYNA MARTINEZ Graphics/Painting
Aged 20
Asian/Euro


My name is Aleyna Martinez, I am born in Malaysia and moved here when I was two. Mostly I grew up in New Zealand, but at the same time, vaguely know what it is to be from Malaysia.
Malaysia is a country made of three dominant cultures, Malay, Chinese and Indian.
I mother is Indian and my father is Chineese, Phillipino and Spanish. However, I can’t speak any of these languages, just English.
I am studying Journalism at Whitireia Polytechnic.
My main passions are in the arts and music and so are people.
Growing up in New Zealand I have been able to experience other cultures and have good friends who are from many different places.
I’m looking forward to participating in the Babel Projects because it will deal with Issues that I am interested in and I’m looking forward to talking to other people about these issues to find what I think fits into the picture!!

FUAD FARAH Film/Documentary
Aged 22
Somali


“I am interested in US foreign policy, Iraq and the powerlessness of the UN. I want t meet a lot of different people and discover the barriers between different cultures. I hope one day we will all put our differences aside”

CECE CHU Painting
Aged 17
Chinese


“BECAUSE I am a Chinese immigrant myself, I am very interested in issues that surround different ethnicities and cultures. From this project I would like to produce work that would raise awareness and promote diversity within our society. I feel this will play an important part in the development of the city because f the increasing amount of immigrants and mixed families in NZ. We nee to embrace the different cultures, leading to a society where not only people are excepted but feel accepted as well.”
Cece was born in Fuzhou, China. She moved Auckland with her parents in 1995. In this beautiful country she found herself with a window of opportunities, and a younger brother in 2000. Her family soon moved to Wellington in 2003.
She is now a 17-year old student at Onslow College. Her chosen subjects are Art-painting, Graphics, Statistics, English and Economics. Art, painting and Graphics being her favourites. Being Chinese and having parents both working in the area, she has great interest in global and local issues surrounding different ethnicities.
Through this project, she looks forward to exploring both global/local issues and her artistic side to produce artworks that promote ethnic diversity and understanding.

LUCINDA REN Typography/Painting
Aged 16
Chinese


“I’d like to see peoples views on global issues and also learn more about them. I treasure and adore Wellington because it is so multicultural, even walking down the streets with he different shops. It makes the city an even more interesting and amazing place to be. We need to inform the people of Wellington about different cultures and countries.”


MAREIKURA TAKIRI WHAKATAKA_BRIGHTWELL Film
Aged 23
Maori male

OUR DOCUMENTARY TEAM.

EMMA CULLEN Editing/Film
Aged 23
Pakeha


“I am interested in the treatment of non-heterosexual people in countries where this is not accepted. How immigrants of non-heterosexual backgrounds when entering countries that accept this way of life assimilate and cope.
Wellington’s strength is in its multicultural side as the diversity of people makes the city so interesting. Wellington could become more open-minded and accepting if it paid more attention to those on its fringes, rather than those already established.”

STEPHEN WHITING FILM
Aged 28
Pakeha/ Austrian


ROHAN SATYANAND Film
Indian/Kiwi
Has attended the Avalon Film and Television school, and attained a BA from Victoria University. He is a freelance camera operator, technician, producer, editor and director. He has worked in television business, on projects from large-scale multicamera live broadcasts, to his own independent short films. Toloa and he have recently set up Suite One Films, a production company, and are currently working on several broadcast projects and corporate videos.
Rohan has Indo-Fijian and Pakeha heritage, and has travelled extensively through Asia and both American continents. He believes that truth and understanding are our best weapons against ignorance, the source of so many of our world's problems.
The Babel Project is a positive step towards increasing that cross-cultural understanding. Rohan is looking forward to the challenge of doing justice to such an important venture on screen.

TOLOA PETAIA Film
Samoan/Tokelauan
Also studied at the Film and TV school and has been involved in a number of television projects since. He freelances in the grip, camera and lighting departments on a range of shoots, from big-budget drama projects for international audiences, to event coverage and outside broadcasts. As well as being experienced behind a camera, Toloa is a talented sound recordist and editor. Rohan and he are currently working on several projects together under the name Suite One Films.
Of Tokelauan descent, Toloa is interested in Polynesian cultures in the New Zealand community and loves to travel in the Pacific Islands. Jesus Christ “You shall love your neighbour as yourself” sums a personal belief up best.
The essence of this ethos is echoed in the objectives of the Babel Project and the message has never been more critical than in today's global situation.


ROBIN GREENBERG
American
MENTOR FOR DOCUMENTARY

CAMERON BURNELL Photographer
23 Years Old

Grew up in Tai Tokerau (The far north of NZ)
7th Generation Pakeha
Favourite quote:

"Freedom is something you assume and wait for someone to take it from you.
The degree to which you resist is the degree to which you are free."
UTAH PHILLIPS

Something that I am immensely proud of, as a New Zealander is who we are.
Wherever we come from or whatever we look like we are all here on this little piece of beautiful land, growing and learning together. What ever our differences are we are all kiwis.

4 years ago I began studying photography at Mel Philips School of photography www.photoschool.com
Since then I have worked as a freelance photographer working in the Wellington region.
My passion lies in documentary photography. I've always loved any medium, which tells stories through images.

Ends

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