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Smokers support increased regulation of tobacco industry


Tuesday 22 May 2012

Smokers support increased regulation of tobacco industry

Just published research has found strong support from New Zealand smokers for much greater regulation of the tobacco industry.

The lead author of the study, Professor Richard Edwards of the ASPIRE 2025 research collaboration, says the results clearly indicate the Government could and should act with much greater boldness in pursuing its ‘Smokefree New Zealand 2025’ goal.

The public health researchers from the University of Otago, Wellington found that 65% of a sample of over 1300 smokers agreed with the statement ‘tobacco companies should be more tightly regulated’.

This support was even higher at 70% for Māori smokers and 74% for Pacific smokers. Those smokers under financial stress were also more likely to agree to the statement.

There was also strong majority agreement (59% agree) that the government should do more to tackle the harm done by smoking, with higher percentages agreeing amongst Māori (66%) and Pacific (78%) smokers.

A sizeable proportion of smokers also supported radical endgame plans for tobacco. That is, 46% supported the setting of a date to ban commercial tobacco in ten years ‘if effective nicotine substitutes became available’ among 921 smokers asked this question. A majority of Pacific smokers (62%) supported this and those smokers living in deprived (poorer) areas were much more likely to agree with the statement.

Professor Edwards says significant countrywide debate on the role of the tobacco industry as the ultimate cause of the tobacco epidemic has been generated through the Māori Affairs Select Committee hearings and the Committee’s subsequent report and positive Government response. He says that, considering the surveys were done between 2007 and 2009 before the idea of ending tobacco use was publically discussed in New Zealand, it is likely that support could be even greater now.

“These findings are consistent with international research showing that the public and smokers want clear leadership and action by governments to stop the tobacco epidemic and realise the 2025 smoke-free goal,” says co-author Dr Heather Gifford from Whakauae Research Services.

She says that previous New Zealand research showed a similar level of support for other measures such as plain packaging of tobacco products and a ban on smoking in cars.

“All these surveys demonstrate that most people now support a ban on smoking in cars where children are present. Indeed this same study showed 96% support by smokers”.

Dr Gifford, who works in the area of tobacco control to benefit Māori health, added that: “we are seeing, clear leadership from the Associate Minister of Health in the regulatory areas of smoking in cars and plain packs. But such leadership needs to expand to across the political spectrum and include iwi and community wide leadership supporting such courageous moves”.

The research was funded by the Health Research Council and was published in the international peer-reviewed journal “Tobacco Control”.

An online abstract of the article is at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22535362 A full PDF can be emailed on request (richard.edwards@otago.ac.nz)

The title of the research is: “Support for a tobacco endgame and increased regulation of the tobacco industry among New Zealand smokers: results from a National Survey”.

Edwards R, Wilson N, Peace J, Weerasekera D, Thomson GW, Gifford H. (Tobacco Control)

ends

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