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Kiwis Confess their Greatest Frustrations

Monday 8 October

Kiwis Confess their Greatest Frustrations


www.firstworldproblems.co.nz

If you’ve ever complained about snail-paced internet access or have vented about not being able to find something in the supermarket, then you’re not alone! Kiwis have named these as their biggest ‘First World Problems’ in a new survey from UNICEF NZ and UMR Research.*

The survey marks the launch of a new online campaign from UNICEF NZ (UN Children’s Fund). The video driven campaign, starring Kiwi actor Grant Roa, is based on the ‘First World Problems’ internet phenomenon that makes fun of the trivial things we often complain about.

New Zealand’s top ten ‘First World Problems are’:**

1) Slow internet access (80% admitted to complaining about this)
2) Not being able to find something in the supermarket (65%)
3) Bad tasting fruit, like a mushy apple (55%)
4) Getting a terrible haircut (42%)
5) The TV remote not working (36%)
6) Having to move to get mobile coverage (34%)
7) The barista not making coffee how you like it (31%)
8) Not being able to access email/internet (31%)
9-) Your couch being uncomfortable (21%)
9-) Not being able to win a game on your mobile phone or console (21%)

Kiwis have also revealed what irks them most about other people with 88% getting annoyed with people over-reacting to minor situations, 78% saying that they can’t stand the attention given to the lives of celebrities, and 68% saying that people oversharing on Facebook and other social media really gets their goat.

Richard Boyd, Digital Marketing Manager at UNICEF NZ, said “Let’s face it, we all have those little everyday irritations or ‘First World Problems’ in our lives and we’ll all probably recognize ourselves or someone we know from the campaign videos.

“By tapping into the massively popular ‘First World Problems’ internet trend, we want to make people laugh but there’s also a serious underlying message to the campaign. We’re hoping we can also introduce people to some of the real world problems affecting kids and their families in the developing world.”

In the serious of videos Grant Roa stars as the First World Problems guy. He’s joined by a host of other Kiwi acting talent such as Dame Kate Harcourt. Grant appears in different situations to challenge the trivial things we complain about: from the nana who complains her grandson’s too soft, to the young dudes bored to tears by New Zealand, to the teenage girl who’s so over having to go school every day.

In each scenario Grant suggests a swap with a character from a developing country to illustrate a genuine real world problem. Viewers are then asked to go to the campaign website (firstworldproblems.co.nz) to find out more about the real world problems and countries mentioned in the videos.

Grant said, “I’m a big fan of UNICEF NZ’s work and jumped at the opportunity to use humour for an awesome cause. I hope everyone loves the campaign …even my mum.”

Richard Boyd added, “We’d love people to share the videos and then visit the campaign website for more information on the real issues portrayed, but ultimately we’re hoping that Kiwis will also want to partner with UNICEF NZ as donors to solve real world problems.

“Every day UNICEF is working on the ground in over 190 countries, from the Solomon Islands to Syria, to make life better for children. Our work includes helping children who have been child soldiers, giving people access to clean water, ensuring children can attend school and so much more. As a charity relying on voluntary donations, there’s so much more we can do with the support of New Zealanders.”

Check out the First World Problems campaign at: www.firstworldproblems.co.nz

-ends-

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