Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Child-related payments to caregivers exclude 230,000

Child-related payments to caregivers exclude 230,000 poorest children

CPAG appeals for funds to fight this injustice

Increasing numbers of New Zealanders are alarmed about the disgraceful level of child poverty in this country.  Child Poverty Action Group believes private charity cannot fix this problem and major changes to government policy are needed.

CPAG continues to challenge successive governments in the courts over the In Work Tax Credit which is denied to 230,000 children living in some of the poorest families in New Zealand.

“We need another $25,000 to take our long running human rights case the next step,” says CPAG Director Associate Professor Michael O’Brien.  

The In Work Tax Credit (IWTC) is a child-related family assistance payment.  As part of Working for Families it is supposed to reduce child poverty, yet 230,000 children miss out if their caregivers receive a benefit or are studying.  CPAG believes there are many other ways to create work incentives that don’t discriminate against the poorest children.  The IWTC is worth $60 or more a week and would make a big difference to struggling families. 

Until now, the Office of Human Rights Proceedings at the Human Rights Commission has paid for CPAG’s legal team.  They have pledged to continue providing junior counsel, but can no longer offer funding for senior counsel, court fees or expenses.  CPAG’s counsel has committed to do some of the work pro bono.  CPAG has raised nearly $25,000 to progress this case to the Court of Appeal, but needs a further $25,000 to cover legal costs.

To donate to our appeal please visit: http://www.cpag.org.nz/how-to-help/2012-appeal-help-fight-for-the-rights-of/  or make a direct deposit via Kiwibank 38-9003-0066858-08 please use APPEAL and your name as a reference. 

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government
More Open

It’s true that New Zealand scores well on many international rankings of openness... Those findings are all important, and welcome. But we cannot ignore the fact that there are still serious problems.

For a start, those international surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

Visions: National Party Conference

National Party leader Bill English today outlined his vision to take New Zealand into the 2020s and his key priorities for the next Parliamentary term – including further raising incomes and reducing taxes. More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman: Canterbury Schools Reorganisation Mishandled

An investigation into the Canterbury schools reorganisation after the February 2011 earthquakes has found significant gaps and flaws in the Ministry’s engagement and communications with schools and communities. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission: Contempt Report "Protects Right To Fair Trial"

The proposed Act limits what news media representatives and bloggers can report on court proceedings, but it also makes clearer than the current law where the line is between contempt and freedom of expression. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog
More RSS News Alerts