Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Government funding cuts strips tutors from Manukau


15 November 2012

Government funding cuts strips tutors from Manukau

The Manukau Institute of Technology (MIT) is looking to cut courses and staff in its English, foundation studies, business services, horticulture, automotive and trades schools. The cuts follow a decision by the Tertiary Education Commission several weeks ago to cut the polytechnic’s funding for 400 full-time students.

The course closures are the result of a decision by the government earlier this year to put one-third of its foundation level student achievement funding up for tender – $38 million out of $115 million. When the minister announced the results of that tender process two-thirds of polytechnics missed out on funding needed to run foundation courses, including MIT.

The polytechnic also plans to cut carpentry staff after losing industry training work. Together the reviews propose a staffing loss of the equivalent of 25 full-time teachers.

Sandra Grey, TEU national president, says the loss of funding is a huge blow to education in South Auckland.

"This is on top of institution-wide reviews which shed over 50 staff at the end of last year."

"The government is sacrificing well-established and resourced programmes in its hunt for cheap delivery."

TEU understands funding for level 1 and 2 horticulture has gone to the Apostolic Church. Another private training company that won funding to deliver level 1 and 2 automotive programmes is now approaching institutions such as MIT in search of programmes and facilities to run the courses for which it tendered.
ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government
More Open

It’s true that New Zealand scores well on many international rankings of openness... Those findings are all important, and welcome. But we cannot ignore the fact that there are still serious problems.

For a start, those international surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

 
 

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

Visions: National Party Conference

National Party leader Bill English today outlined his vision to take New Zealand into the 2020s and his key priorities for the next Parliamentary term – including further raising incomes and reducing taxes. More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman: Canterbury Schools Reorganisation Mishandled

An investigation into the Canterbury schools reorganisation after the February 2011 earthquakes has found significant gaps and flaws in the Ministry’s engagement and communications with schools and communities. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission: Contempt Report "Protects Right To Fair Trial"

The proposed Act limits what news media representatives and bloggers can report on court proceedings, but it also makes clearer than the current law where the line is between contempt and freedom of expression. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog