Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


British minister needs wider perspective of public sector

15 November 2012
British minister needs wider perspective of public sector reform

The Public Service Association says if a visiting British minister wants to pick up ideas for public service reform, he needs to be doing more than just talking to senior government officials and politicians.

Cabinet Office Minister Francis Maude is in New Zealand to look at ways Britain’s public sector can be more accountable and efficient.

PSA National Secretary Brenda Pilott says while New Zealand does have a highly regarded public sector internationally due to its transparency and lack of corruption, it should not be held up as a world-leading model.

“On the surface we appear to have a robust accountability regime with endless reporting and monitoring, but if you take a deeper look it unravels into box-ticking and political face-saving. I think we have seen this with Pike River where there was a clear gap between being seen to be accountable and what was actually happening on the ground.”

She says political interference is also increasingly driving public sector accountability.

“It’s hard to think of a chief executive who has had to resign because his or her department has failed to achieve some important, over-arching goal or taking responsibility for major service failures. Resignations, when they occur, tend to be the result of political clashes.”

Brenda Pilott says in terms of efficiencies the British public should not be subjected to the New Zealand government’s do-more-with-less management of the public sector and moves towards more privatisation.

“Francis Maude needs to be aware of the effects of those policies on the public in terms of reduced services and the loss of capacity within the public service.

“I would urge him to meet with frontline public servants and go out and get a wider perspective, rather than being sold a theoretical picture of New Zealand’s public sector by senior government and departmental officials.”

The PSA would welcome an opportunity to meet with him during his visit.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Sugar: Auckland Leisure Centres Axe Unhealthy Drinks

Auckland Council is to stop selling drinks that are sweetened by sugar from vending machines at its leisure centres in a bid to try to reduce obesity and type 2 diabetes... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Todd McClay’s Faulty Memory

Time and again, whenever an issue arises the initial response by government is to deny or diminish the problem – nothing to worry about here, everything’s OK, move on. Then, hang on. In line with the usual pattern, as embarrassing details emerged into daylight, the story changed. More>>

ALSO:

Labour's 'Future Of Work': Major Reform Of Careers And Apprenticeships

The next Labour Government will transform careers advice in high schools to ensure every student has a personalised career plan, Leader of the Opposition Andrew Little says. More>>

ALSO:

State Investments Management: Treasury Likes IRD, Not Education Or Corrections

The Inland Revenue Department has scored an 'A' in the first tranche of the Treasury's investor confidence rating for state agencies that manage significant Crown investments and assets, gaining greater autonomy as a result, while the Corrections and Education ministries gained a 'C' rating. More>>

ALSO:

Govt Goal: NZ To Be "Predator Free" By 2050

Prime Minister John Key has today announced the Government has adopted the goal of New Zealand becoming Predator Free by 2050... “That’s why we have adopted this goal. Our ambition is that by 2050 every single part of New Zealand will be completely free of rats, stoats and possums." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The IOC’s Treatment Of Russian Sport, And Lone Wolf Terrorism

A blanket ban on Russian athletes would also have exposed the IOC to criticism that its treatment of Russia would have been marked contrast to its treatment say, of the track and field team from Kenya – a country about which the IOC has very similar doping concerns. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news