Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


New Zealand to lead the world in sustainable energy


New Zealand to lead the world in sustainable energy

Future U winner Stephen Lines laid down a challenge to the invited audience at It’s Our Future – the new New Zealand Forum in Auckland today to focus on sustainable energy.

The 18-year-old Wellingtonian provided the opening address at the forum, sharing his vision of New Zealand in 2050. He proposed a world that is fundamentally similar to what we currently enjoy, with shared prosperity and people who will continue to contribute to the world economy in sustainable ways.

“New Zealand will continue to be that little old country in the corner of the world who will forever stand up for the common good and decency… and will not conform to what we do not see as a benefit to our people or environment. As a multicultural people, we will continue to thrive in social diversity and acceptance… and I believe we will see the first Maori Prime Minister.

However, Mr Lines does see a battle ahead to adjust the focus of the New Zealand economy from fossil fuels.

“We will struggle to transition from an oil-based economy, but we need to invest in renewable energy sources,” he says. “We can become producers of electricity with solar power and wind power that can be integrated into the national grid.”

Mr Lines was buoyed by comments from TUANZ chief executive and panellist Paul Brislen. He suggested New Zealand could become a primary producer of global technology exporting data from New Zealand-based data farms powered using renewable resources instead of coal and nuclear power, as is currently the case in the United States.

“It is ultimately a voyage into the unknown... but whether it be through action, policy making or leadership, everyone has a responsibility to make New Zealand and the world a better place to live in. How will we contribute to make New Zealand a better place in the future?”

Other panellists included retirement commissioner Diana Crossan, lawyer Mai Chen, journalist Rod Oram, Professor Rawiri Taonui from AUT University, DDB managing director Justin Mowday and Westpac chief economist Dominick Stephens. The keynote speaker was Daniel Franklin, executive editor of the Economist.

Vice-Chancellor Steve Maharey says today’s forum is the first of a series on the future featuring international thought leaders.

“It is the role of a university to encourage a range of opinions and how we might intelligently confront long-term global issues. We don’t intend to stop talking about the future,” he says.

The Forum is available to view online at: http://www.massey.ac.nz/massey/about-massey/events/new-nz-forum/en/watch-live.cfm

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On Journalism’s Future In The Era Of “Alternative Facts.”

Already, the White House has made it clear that the media are the new enemy that the new President’s supporters will be encouraged to unite against. (What else can they do now they don’t have Hillary Clinton to demonise any more?)

The fantastic phrase “alternative facts” coined by Trump spinmeister Kellyanne Conway captures the media strategy in a nutshell. More>>

 

Employment: Minimum Wage To Increase To $15.75

The minimum wage will increase by 50 cents to $15.75 an hour on 1 April 2017... The starting-out and training hourly minimum wage rates will increase from $12.20 to $12.60 per hour, remaining at 80 per cent of the adult minimum wage.More>>

ALSO:

Housing: Sit-In Occupation To Stop Niki’s Eviction

The Tāmaki Redevelopment Company hopes to issue a Possession Order for 14 Taniwha Street, Glen Innes. This will give them the ability to forcibly evict Ioela ‘Niki’ Rauti who has lived at 14 Taniwha Street for 21 years... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Bill English, Abroad

If David Cameron was the closest thing John Key had to a political mentor, their successors also share a whole lot in common. Theresa May and Bill English were both propelled into the top jobs as the result of unexpected resignations, and without much in the way of credible competition from their colleagues... More>>

ALSO:

Pike River: Labour Bill To Override Safety Act For Mine Entry

“Bill English has been hiding behind the legal excuse that any attempt to re-enter the mine to recover the bodies might place the mine’s owner, Solid Energy Limited, and its directors in breach of the Health and Safety at Work Act 2015." More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Populism And Labour 2017

For many people on the centre-left, populism is a dirty word, and a shorthand for the politics of bigotry. In this country, it has tended to be equated with the angry legions of New Zealand First. Who knew they were not just a reactionary spasm, but the wave of the future? More>>

Oxfam: 30% Of NZ Owns Less Wealth Than Our Two Richest Men

The research also reveals that the richest one per cent have 20 per cent of the wealth in New Zealand, while 90 per cent of the population owns less than half of the nation’s wealth. The research forms part of a global report released to coincide with this week’s annual meeting of political and business leaders at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news