Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Health Board Considering Giving Dangerous Drug To Children

19 December 2012

Media Release

Taranaki District Health Board Considering Giving Dangerous Drug To Children

A sub-committee of the Taranaki District Health Board has recommended that the morning after pill be free at pharmacies for those between 12 and 24 years of age. It also recommended that the costs of contraception at general practices be reduced and that education for youth about healthy sexuality be provided. The objective of these measures was to reduce the very high teenage pregnancies in Taranaki and was part of the development of Taranaki’s [youth] health strategy.

The morning after pill and contraception is not the solution, International research has consistently shown that access to the morning after pill does not result in a reduction of unplanned pregnancies, births, abortions and STDs. A recent study at the University of North Carolina revealed that increased access to the morning after pill resulted in an increase of sexually transmitted diseases. The results are similar to a British study conducted by staff at the Nottingham University in 2010.

In 2007 a review of twenty-three studies published between 1998 and 2006 and analysed by a team at Princeton University, measured the effect of increased access to the morning after pill on unintended pregnancy and abortions. Every study showed that there was no reduction in unintended pregnancies or abortions following increased access to emergency contraception.

In 2005 the World Health Organisation declared that the contraceptive pill including the emergency contraceptive pill was carcinogenic to humans, it increases the risk of breast cancer, cervical cancer and liver cancer.

• What studies has the government conducted in New Zealand on the effectiveness of emergency contraception in reducing unplanned pregnancies, abortions and sexually transmitted diseases?

• Why do our health authorities continue to encourage young women to take dangerous drugs such as the emergency contraceptive pill that are detrimental to their health?

• Why would the Board consider giving free emergency pills to children as young as 12 years of age without the knowledge and consent of parents?

The Taranaki District Health Board is commended for being concerned about the health and welfare of its teenagers. To effect a real change and a decrease in these disturbing statistics we need a behavioural change in teenagers. This can be achieved by encouraging them to practise chastity before marriage and faithfulness within it. Our children and teenagers deserve better. Should we be surprised when they are exposed to Family Planning sex education, promiscuous TV and pornography. Right to Life requests that the Health Board protects the health of the young women in their area by:

• Rejecting the recommendation of the Board’s sub-committee to provide free emergency contraception and reducing the charges for contraception.

• Introducing educational programmes that involve parents being involved such as the Catholic Churches Theology of the Body lecture series which promotes chastity before marriage and faithfulness within marriage.

ends


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On The Ombudsman’s Verdict On Paula Rebstock And Ian Rennie

Unfortunately, the brave and damning report by Ombudsman Ron Paterson on the “flawed” and “unfair” inquiry conducted by Dame Paula Rebstock into events at MFAT pulls back the veil on a far wider issue. More>>

ALSO:

Charities' Report: Stressed Families - Overstretched Services

“Like so many of the whānau and families they serve social service organisations are under huge financial stress. The support demanded from desperate people in communities is far outreaching the resources available.” More>>

ALSO:

Detention: Wellingtonians Protest Treatment Of Refugees

Peace Action Wellington (PAW) and around 50 Wellingtonians blockaded the Australian High Commission, creating a symbolic detention centre to protest the Australian Government's policy of mandatory offshore detention for refugees and asylum seekers. More>>

ALSO:

Diver's Alarums: Breach Means Training Provider Must Repay $1.47 Million

The New Zealand School of Outdoor Studies is to repay $1.47 million (GST-exclusive) to the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) following an investigation which showed that some student enrolments between 2009 -2014 could not be validated and that courses were under-delivered against their agreement with the TEC. More>>

ALSO:

Education: Government Plans Suggest Bulk Funding Return

Plans by the Government to return to bulk funding are likely to see increased class sizes and schools most in need missing out on much-needed resources, Labour’s Acting Education spokesperson Grant Robertson says. More>>

ALSO:

Interim Report: Auckland Looks Long Term To Pay-Per-Km Road Pricing

Aucklanders can expect to be paying variable rates per kilometre to travel on the city's most congested roads under an emerging transport strategy being formulated by the government and the Auckland Council. More>>

ALSO:

Despite Promises: Government Extends Iraq Deployment

Cabinet has agreed to extend New Zealand’s contribution to the joint New Zealand-Australia mission to train Iraqi Security Forces until November 2018. More>>

ALSO:

On The 'Terrorism' Card:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news