Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui Deed of Settlement signed today

21 December 2012

Historic $20 million Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui Deed of Settlement to be signed today (Friday 21 December) at Waikawa Marae, Picton

A new era begins for Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui today with the signing of their historic Te Tiriti o Waitangi Deed of Settlement at a ceremony at Waikawa Marae, Picton, at 3pm.

The $20 million settlement with the Crown includes a package of returned land, commercial property – such as local schools and other government-owned properties – important cultural redress and a $11.3million cash component.

The Deed of Settlement will be signed on behalf of the Crown by the Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations, Hon Christopher Finlayson, and on behalf of Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui by its Trustees: Glenice Paine (Chair), Ronald Riwaka (Deputy Chair), Cindy Batt, Vennessa Ede, John Katene, Jon McGregor, William Reeves, Te Hawe Ruru, Ngawaina Shorrock and Neville Watson Tahuaroa.

History of Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui claim

Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui are the people of Te tiawa descent who whakapapa to Te Tau Ihu o Te Waka-a-Māui (the top of the South Island).

They originated from the Taranaki region, but by the 1830s were firmly based throughout the top of the South Island. By 1840 – when Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui signed Te Tiriti o Waitangi at Tōtaranui (Queen Charlotte Sound) - they were a dynamic and robust society with their own lands and cultural customs that regulated their life both on land and at sea.

The arrival of the New Zealand Company adversely affected Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui. Further, the Crown – under the leadership of Governor Grey – acquired much of the tribe’s land, with rangatira coerced into accepting minimal payment.

Within three decades of Te Ātiawa rangatira signing Te Tiriti, extensive Crown purchases in Te Tau Ihu had left Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui virtually landless.

Further encroachment of remaining Te Ātiawa land happening at the end of the 19th Century and throughout the 20th Century when land – particularly near Waikawa reserve - was taken by the Crown for public works.

The loss of land had a detrimental effect on the spiritual, economic and cultural wellbeing of Te Ātiawa as an Iwi.

Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui first lodged their claim with the Waitangi Tribunal in 1996. Since then almost two generations of Te Ātiawa whānui have worked to right the breaches of the obligations the Crown took towards all Māori through Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

In its apology to Te Ātiawa o Te Waka-a-Māui, the Crown says: “Through this apology the Crown seeks to atone for these wrongs and hopes that this settlement will mark the beginning of a new relationship with Te Ātiawa based on the Treaty of Waitangi and its principles.”


Settlement package

The settlement package will be made up of returned land, commercial property; such as local schools and other government-owned properties along with important cultural redress components.

The Deed of Settlement package includes the following:

Te Ātiawa has secured:

- 100% ownership of the Queen Charlotte Forest in Tory Channel, excluding 16 ha
-
- 100% of the Rai Valley Forest from Havelock to Whangamoa
-
- 100% of the Golden Downs West 14
-
- 50% of the Upper Motueka West 11 Forest
-
- 50% of the Golden Downs 12
-
- 33.3% of the Motueka 16 and 17 Forests.
-
-
This land has a total value of approximately $6million.

Properties on Settlement:

- Army Drill Hall – Nelson
-
- Picton Police Station
-
- Motueka Department of Conservation building
-
- Golden Bay High School shared 50% with Ngāti Tama.
-
-
Cultural redress:

- Kaitiaki (guardianship) of Queen Charlotte Sound conservation
-
The Crown will acknowledge the role of Te Ātiawa as kaitiaki (guardian) over the coastal marine area in the Queen Charlotte Sound, including Pickersgill Island, Blumine Island, Allports Island, Mabel Island and Amerikiwhati Island.

Te Ātiawa will prepare a kaitiaki plan setting out its values in relation to the coastal marine area in the Queen Charlotte Sound, for the Marlborough District Council to treat as a Resource Management Act 1991 planning document.

- Kahu Kiwi overlay classification (cultural protection)
-
The Crown will acknowledge Te Ātiawa values in relation to each of the following sites:

• East Head, Arapaoa Island

• Waikoropupū Springs Scenic Reserve (shared with Ngāti Tama and Ngāti Rārua)

• Farewell Spit Nature Reserve (shared with Ngāti Tama and Ngāti Rārua)

• The Brothers Islands (shared with Ngāti Toa)

• Heaphy Track (the northern portion) (shared with Ngāti Tama, Ngāti Rārua and Ngāti Apa).


- Special Redress Waikawa Bay
-
The Crown is to offer advice and expertise to Te Ātiawa to undertake a scoping study on options to improve the quality of the marine environment in Waikawa Bay, to specified standards such as those suitable for bathing and shellfish gathering.

- New and Altered names
-
The settlement legislation will alter the geographic names, including the following:


Existing geographic names Altered geographic name

Queen Charlotte Sound (Tōtaranui) Queen Charlotte Sound / Tōtaranui

Separation Point Separation Point / Te Matau

Mount Campbell Mount Pukeone / Mount Campbell

Pickersgill Island Matapara / Pickersgill Island

Mount Robertson Mount Tokomaru / Mount Robertson

Tory Channel Tory Channel / Kura Te Au

Arapawa Island Arapaoa Island

Riwaka River Riuwaka River

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell:
On The Eleanor Catton Rumpus

If anyone was in doubt about the accuracy of the comments made in India by Eleanor Catton, the reaction from some quarters here at home has gone a long way to proving her point.

By ‘some quarters’, I mean (a) RadioLive host Sean Plunket who called Catton a “traitor” and (b) Prime Minister John Key who dismissed her views as being those of a typical Green Party supporter, which is apparently almost as bad.

In context, Catton seemed to be talking about the mixed feelings she felt after what she had created suddenly becoming a kind of public property claimed by the entire country and its leaders. That must feel weird at any time, in any place. Catton evidently finds it particularly alienating when the government of the day has shown little interest in the arts beyond their promotional/economic value. More>>

 

More Rent Assistance, Less State-Owned Housing: John Key Speech - Next Steps In Social Housing

"We are going to ensure that more people get into social housing over the next three years, whether that is run by Housing New Zealand or a community provider. The social housing budget provides for around 62,000 income-related rent subsidies a year. We are committed to increasing that to around 65,000 subsidies by 2017/18, which will cost an extra $40 million a year." More>>

ALSO:

The Future Of Work: Andrew Little - State Of The Nation 2015

In 2005 when I led the EPMU we worked together with Air New Zealand to find a way to keep engineering jobs that were heading overseas. A lot of these workers were people I’d known for years and they were facing not just losing their jobs but not being able to find the kind of work they do without going overseas. A lot of people were facing personal and financial upheaval.... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Sabin Case, The Pressures On Greece And (Songs About) Coyotes

Mike Sabin is a National MP, and the current chairman of Parliament’s law and order committee. Yet reportedly, he is being investigated by the Police over an assault complaint... However, the PM will not comment on any aspect of the story. More>>

ALSO:

Houses, ISIS, King (& Catton): PM Post-Cabinet Press Conference

The Prime Minister met with reporters to discuss: • Social housing, the Auckland housing market • The prospect of joining international forces to combat ISIS • David Bain’s compensation • The lowering of the flag for the King of Saudi Arabia's death ... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Tomorrow’s Speeches By John Key And Andrew Little

The Key government has already kicked off the political year on a stridently ideological note, with Environment Minister Nick Smith choosing to lay all manner of sins at the door of the RMA. Tomorrow, the government will wheeling out its best salesman – Prime Minister John Key – to sell its plans for state housing… . More>>

ALSO:

Transport: Auckland Looks To Light Rail

The Board of Auckland Transport has called for an investigation into a light rail network, which could relieve traffic congestion on some of the region’s busiest roads. This stems from work in 2012 (the City Centre Future Access study) which responded to a government request to develop a robust and achievable solution for access to the CBD. More>>

ALSO:

RMA: Smith's Claims Don't Match Evidence - Greens

The Motu group’s research into the impacts of planning rules looked at the costs related to housing development but not the benefits of environmental protections and does not recommend significant changes to the RMA to reduce the cost of new house builds. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news