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Kiwis Uncertain About What The Future Holds


Media Release
21 February, 2013

Kiwis Uncertain About What The Future Holds

The OPSM Future Vision Survey shows New Zealanders miss good old fashioned values

According to the OPSM Future Vision Survey, nearly 60% of Kiwis are concerned about the future deterioration of their local community, with a staggering 46% of New Zealanders admitting they don’t know most of their neighbours.

The Future Vision Survey was commissioned by OPSM to launch Accufit – the latest service technology to find the perfect frames, exclusive to OPSM. OPSM has been looking after the eyes of Australasians for over 80 years and to mark the launch, OPSM found out what Kiwi’s value and hope for the next 80 years.

Only 17% of Kiwis believe the world is a better place than it was when they were younger. The primary reason for its decline is the belief people are becoming more self-centred and greedy (80%) followed by less human interaction (60%). The lack of human interaction was further reinforced with 62% of New Zealanders stating the main aspect they miss from yesteryear is the ability to speak with a local customer service representative, while 48% miss having the local corner store owner knowing their name.

However, it is not all bad news, with family and friends topping the list of what makes Kiwis happiest, far exceeding fulfilment at work or having the latest gadget. In addition, New Zealanders identified friendship (togetherness/friendliness) as the top item they would put in a time capsule to be opened in 80 years’ time.

Professor Paul Spoonley, Research Director at Massey University’s College of Humanities and Social Sciences, says that despite concern over what will happen to our communities in the future, the research highlights New Zealander’s desire for strong social connections.

“The OPSM Future Vision Survey results show there is a very strong orientation towards family and friends, as well as issues such as the quality of life and personal happiness. Kiwis are not unhappy, but there is a theme running through the results that indicates there is nostalgia for good old fashioned values, especially as we might expect from older New Zealanders. This is further strengthened by results from the future gazing section of the survey which indicate that personalised and automatically tailored services in shops is one of the most popular requests for change.”

“It is also interesting to see that advancements in technology provide a reason for optimism. Nearly all Kiwis (94%) believe that advances in communication technology have had a positive impact on their lives. Over time, as technology continues to connect people, it may be that the concern of diminished physical communities gives way to optimism around virtual communities helping to compensate. In addition, the enthusiasm for new technologies, as evidenced in the survey, reinforces the fact that New Zealanders are early adopters of new technology,” says Spoonley.

Combining the desire for better customer service and positivity around technological advancements, OPSM is launching Accufit across all stores in New Zealand.

Matthew Whiting, National Eyecare Manager for OPSM New Zealand, says Accufit ensures customers can have the utmost confidence in their choices and best experience at any OPSM.

“Accufit is the first of its kind in Australasia and enables us to improve and customise every aspect of service for individual customers. The exclusive service technology ensures accuracy when determining prescription placement on the lens within your frames. Many people do not know that if you wear ill-fitting glasses; your eyes may feel sore and tired. Poorly placed lenses can also cause headaches and make you feel nauseous. Accufit also offers a lens simulator so you can really see the difference in the types of lenses available and a virtual mirror which gives customers the ability to see themselves in four different glasses at the same time.”

The complimentary Accufit service is being offered at OPSM stores nationwide. For more information on Accufit visit www.opsm.co.nz/accufit or head to your local OPSM store.

OPSM Future Vision Survey findings
• The most important thing that New Zealanders value today is their family (including children). Women are more likely to rate their family as what they value the most
• The other two most important things Kiwis value is their health (2nd) and financial security (3rd). Those aged 50+ are more likely to value their health the most
• The thing New Zealanders like most about their surrounding environment in which they live is peace and quiet. Older New Zealanders are likely to rank peace and quiet higher
• 58% of New Zealanders agree at this moment they feel part of the community, but they worry the community is disappearing around them
• 21% of people feel it is pretty isolated where they live
• Of the technological changes New Zealanders have seen during the last 20 years, the one they have welcomed most positively is the internet. This was followed by email, internet banking and portable communications
• When thinking about what the world will look like in 80 years’ time, 25% of New Zealanders are optimistic, 28% are pessimistic and 47% are undecided. For those who are optimistic, the main reason for their positive outlook for 2093 is better healthcare
• Two thirds (65%) of Kiwis believe that in 80 years’ time New Zealand will no longer be part of the Commonwealth
• The primary concern New Zealanders have about what may disappear altogether in 80 years’ time is the variety of wildlife
• When thinking about what the world will be like in 80 years’ time, the average New Zealander believes the retirement age will be 69
• Kiwis believe technological advancements during the next 80 years will have a negative impact on manners (69%), conversation ability (63%) and morals (58%)
• 90% of New Zealanders agree that regardless of how the world changes in the future their values won’t. This is reflected in Australia at 92%


About the OPSM Future Vision Survey
The survey was conducted among 1,005 New Zealanders aged 18 years and over. The survey was conducted online amongst members of a permission based panel from throughout New Zealand, including both capital and non-capital city areas. Fieldwork was finalised on Friday 1 February, 2013. At completion the data was weighted to the latest population estimates sourced from Statistics New Zealand.

About OPSM
OPSM is a leading eye care and eyewear retailer and has been looking after the eyes of Australians for 80 years. Part of Luxottica Group, a global eyewear company with over 7,000 retail stores and presence across 130 countries, OPSM has close to 400 stores in Australia and New Zealand and helps more than one million Australians see more clearly each year.

Through its Optometrists, world class technology and exceptional service, OPSM’s goal is to raise the standard of eye health and eye care. In addition to its eye care services, OPSM is renowned for its unrivalled and exclusive range of optical frames and sunglasses from international brands to suit all budgets.

About Luxottica Asia Pacific
Across Asia Pacific, Luxottica has more than 1,000 retail stores under the brands OPSM, Sunglass Hut, Laubman & Pank, Budget Eyewear, Bright Eyes and Just Specs. The company employs close to 5,000 people across Australia and New Zealand. Additional information is available at www.luxottica.com.au

ENDS

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