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The Nation: Ikaroa-Rawhiti, United Future, Shadbolt

21 JUNE 2013

Coming Up Next Week on The Nation

• A lot at stake in Ikaroa-Rawhiti

• Is there a future for United Future?

• Our most trustworthy politician (not an oxymoron)

Ikaroa-Rawhiti - not a done deal for Labour


With one week left of voting, party leaders have joined their candidates to campaign in what is increasingly looking like a close race. The by-election is to replace the late Parekura Horomia, the Labour MP who held the seat for 14 years.


This is a must win race for Labour. It will help their credibility with Maori voters, and give a much needed boost to leader David Shearer.

But they’re not the only party with a lot at stake. The Maori Party wants support for its decision to work with the National Government. They say they’re the party that can deliver to their voters now.

The Nation went to the East Coast electorate, to follow Labour candidate Meka Whaitiri, with leader David Shearer and the Maori Party’s Na Raihania, and co-leader Pita Sharples.


Earlier in the year The Nation had an in depth profile of the Ikaroa-Rawhiti electorate. See it here.

________________________________________

A future for United Future?


Another week, another round of disappointments for Ohariu MP Peter Dunne. His United Future was deregistered at the end of May when Mr Dunne couldn’t front up with enough registered party members. Mr Dunne hoped to talk himself out of it, and get by with electronic registrations.

But on Wednesday, the Electoral Commission refused to allow electronic registrations and told Mr Dunne he’d have to register as a new party – a situation he’s described as “absurd”.

After resigning from his ministerial position surrounded by scandal, Mr Dunne’s party now faces an uncertain future.

New Zealand’s longest standing MP Mr Dunne joins us on Saturday to talk about the Electoral Commission’s decision and explain what will become of the United Future party.

________________________________________

Who says politicians aren't trustworthy?


Long-time Invercargill mayor Tim Shadbolt has been named the most trusted mayor in New Zealand in the 2013 Reader’s Digest poll. As well as being known for his activism and political beliefs, Mr Shadbolt has had a number of TV and film appearances, including Dancing with the Stars and The World’s Fastest Indian.

Rachel Smalley talks to trusty Shadbolt to get his take on his latest honour.

________________________________________

The show goes on


John Barnett, the chairman, founder and ex-CEO of South Pacific Pictures – the company behind Outrageous Fortune, Go Girls, Shortland Street and Almighty Johnsons - joins media panel regulars Dr Brian Edwards and Bill Ralston. He’ll provide his perspective on both Mediaworks going into receivership, and SKY TV’s announcement they had lost the broadcast rights of the English Premier League.

The media panel will look at what the future of television holds. Will TV channels continue to have viewers who are keen to tune in for programming, or will they lose out to internet options?

________________________________________

Ross strikes out at employment law


A private member’s bill that would let businesses employ temporary staff during lock-outs and strikes is currently before the house, and is stirring up controversy.

Spearheaded by National MP Jami-Lee Ross, the Employment Relations Amendment Bill was drawn from the ballot on June 13. National have said that, while it’s not on the party agenda, they’ll support it through to first reading. But with Labour, the Greens, the Maori Party, Mana and now Peter Dunne against the bill, Mr Ross will be relying on the support of NZ First to get the bill passed its first reading.

Mr Ross has called the change necessary due to the impact striking can have on the productivity of businesses. But the EPMU and the Council of Trade Unions have spoken out against the bill, calling it “one-sided”, while Labour’s spokesperson on labour issues Darien Fenton has labelled the bill “sinister”. Even the Employers and Manufacturers Association and Business NZ aren’t convinced by the bill, with the EMA saying it “could prove divisive” while Business NZ says the bill doesn’t fix all the problems with the Employment Relations Act. And everyone seems to agree: this bill hasn’t had a groundswell of support behind it.

Jami-Lee Ross joins us in the studio to explain why he has put forward a bill that has caused Mr Dunne to withdraw his support. Afterwards, Ms Fenton explains why she thinks the bill will harm employees.


ENDS

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