Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

New technology helps problem gamblers

26 June 2013

New technology helps problem gamblers

Facial recognition technology is the way of the future and will significantly help to reduce the harm caused by gambling, says Positive Outlook director Paul Andrew.

Mr Andrew noted that Sky City has announced plans for facial recognition technology to be used in Auckland’s casino. He says this confirms that facial recognition is now mainstream, not science fiction.

Positive Outlook is developing facial recognition technology designed specifically for pub pokie machines. This will be slightly different from the Sky City system, because it will automatically turn off a pokie machine should an excluded player attempt to use it. Mr Andrew hopes facial recognition will be introduced as widely and quickly as possible into all New Zealand gaming lounges.

“There is a lot of interest from the pub gaming sector about doing so. We’re currently working with the New Zealand Community Trust (NZCT) to trial the technology in one of its Hamilton pubs,” says Mr Andrew.

“Ours is a Kiwi-owned and developed software solution which will be built into pokie machines,” he says. “It uses smart-gate photography, similar to that used at passport control stations in airports, to identify whether a pokie player has been excluded from gambling. If they have, the machine will automatically turn off, effectively preventing the player from gambling.

“The trial is going well and has received positive feedback from the MPs and Ministers who have seen demonstrations. We look forward to progressing the trial and working with the industry regulator, the Department of Internal Affairs, to enable its introduction as soon as possible.”

NZCT chief executive, Mike Knell, says the catalyst for developing this new technology came from Te Ururoa Flavell’s Gambling Harm Reduction Bill.

“It’s important for local communities that our funding model is sustainable. Therefore, as well as meeting all current legal obligations, NZCT is supportive of any initiative which can help reduce the harm caused by gambling,” says Mr Knell. MEDIA RELEASE

Page 2


“Naturally, new initiatives have to be tested and proven, but we believe this technology has the potential to significantly reduce the amount of harm problem gamblers cause to themselves and their families,” he says.

“We are assisting by providing Positive Outlook with access to 18 gaming machines in one of our Hamilton venues. The facial recognition technology has been installed in these machines and our publican and his staff are monitoring and responding to the software responses when ‘trial’ excluded problem gamblers attempt to play the machine.

“If this technology is as good as we hope, it will give everyone involved in this sector (the players, problem gambling service providers, the regulator, the publicans and gaming trusts) more assurance and confidence that gambling harm is being minimised.”

– Ends –

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government
More Open

It’s true that New Zealand scores well on many international rankings of openness... Those findings are all important, and welcome. But we cannot ignore the fact that there are still serious problems.

For a start, those international surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

 
 

In Court: Hamilton Student's Lawsuit Over Climate Change Policy

A law student from Hamilton is preparing to challenge the Government in the High Court on Monday over what she says is a “failure” to properly address climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

Visions: National Party Conference

National Party leader Bill English today outlined his vision to take New Zealand into the 2020s and his key priorities for the next Parliamentary term – including further raising incomes and reducing taxes. More>>

ALSO:

Ombudsman: Canterbury Schools Reorganisation Mishandled

An investigation into the Canterbury schools reorganisation after the February 2011 earthquakes has found significant gaps and flaws in the Ministry’s engagement and communications with schools and communities. More>>

ALSO:

Law Commission: Contempt Report "Protects Right To Fair Trial"

The proposed Act limits what news media representatives and bloggers can report on court proceedings, but it also makes clearer than the current law where the line is between contempt and freedom of expression. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election
 
 
 
  • PublicAddress
  • Pundit
  • Kiwiblog