Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Young and old struggle to find suitable work


Hard work getting a job: young and old struggle to find suitable work

Almost three quarters of younger workers forced to take jobs below their education level

Auckland, 27 June 2013: The latest Randstad Workmonitor shows both young and mature age workers continue to face an uphill battle finding a job, with 86% of New Zealanders saying it’s hard for older workers to find a suitable job and 80% forced to take a job below their education level.

Just under two thirds (65%) of Kiwis surveyed say it’s difficult for workers aged under 25 to find a job. Nearly three quarters (73%) of New Zealanders also believe those new to the workforce are often forced to take jobs below their education level.

The Randstad Workmonitor, commissioned by recruitment & HR services specialists, Randstad, surveys over 13,000 people across 32 countries each quarter, also shows that education alone may not be enough to land many younger people their first job, with 77% of New Zealanders saying experience is a more important factor in hiring Gen Y employees than education.

And in a worrying sign for the local job market, New Zealand’s younger workforce is increasingly willing to look elsewhere for employment opportunities; with 42% saying they would look overseas for a suitable job if one wasn’t available in New Zealand. This figure is relatively on par with other surveyed nations, with 43% of young employees in the USA and Germany, 42% of Dutch employees and 32% of those in Switzerland considering roles overseas.

Paul Robinson, Randstad’s New Zealand Director, says it’s important for New Zealand to remain a viable option for employees of all ages.

“The recent data has shown some worrying trends for New Zealand employers. Ensuring New Zealand remains an attractive option for the best young and mature aged talent is going to be of paramount importance for employers.

“Investing in young talent, and embracing knowledgeable mature age workers, should be a core focus for employers. Those businesses that fail to do so may find themselves losing skilled staff which may hinder the future growth of their business.

“Having a blended workforce which combines younger employees with more experienced and knowledgeable talent puts an organisation in a strong position and allows that business to benefit from a range of experiences and ideas.

“We’re entering an interesting phase, whereby there will be four generations in the workforce at one time and it is important for companies to ensure they are attractive to a range of age groups through a diverse recruitment strategy.”

Many Kiwis see the benefits of hiring a diverse range of age groups, with 57% saying the active hiring of workers over the age of 55 would benefit their business, while 69% see the value in actively hiring younger employees.

Paul Robinson says the youth unemployment rate is concerning, and is still far higher than the global average and almost three times more than the national rate. This shows that organisations could be doing more to promote diverse hiring strategies.

“While there are opportunities available for businesses willing to invest in training workers that are new to the workforce, organisations need to remain focussed on motivating people across all age brackets.

“Retaining younger staff requires employers to recognise and meet their needs by offering strong career development opportunities and training and development programs. For mature age workers, being offered flexible working arrangements could be an effective way to attract or retain their skills in the business,” says Robinson.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Departure Speech: Governor-General’s State Farewell Luncheon

"...Unfortunately I was unable to get to the Antarctic, the Chatham Islands and the Kermadecs. A dicky heart thwarted our travel to the Antarctic; and even though I volunteered to parachute into the Kermadecs to join the Young Blake expedition, time, commitments and officials frustrated my plans to visit the Kermadecs and Chathams." More>>

ALSO:

New Research: Most Homeless People Working Or Studying

“The cost of housing has been rising without corresponding increases in income, whilst the number of state houses per capita has been in decline. Many low-income people are missing out on housing, whether we recognise them as ‘homeless’ or not. More>>

ALSO:

Post-Traynor: New Offender Info Sharing Plan

“This Bill delivers on that step-change by moving away from name-based records held by individual agencies to a shared, anchor identity based on unalterable information, such as fingerprints and facial recognition. It also gives agencies access to the drivers’ licence photo database and birth, death and marriages information." More>>

  • NZ Law Foundation - New $2M fund for research on information challenges
  • Littoral: New Ship To Deliver Enhanced Naval Capability

    Defence Minister Gerry Brownlee says the Government has approved a Ministry of Defence and New Zealand Defence Force recommendation to request tenders for a new naval ship to support littoral operations. More>>

    July:

    After King's Labour Snub: Māori Party And Kiingitanga To Work Together

    Māori Party Co-leaders Te Ururoa Flavell and Marama Fox met with Kiingitanga representatives in Wellington yesterday to discuss working together on key issues for the betterment of Māori. More>>

    ALSO:

    Waitangi Claim On Rehabilitation: The 'Justus' System For Māori Not Good Enough

    Closing statements at the Waitangi Tribunal case against Corrections called for immediate steps and a comprehensive review to address the high rate of Māori reoffending. More>>

    ALSO:

    Advice: PM Sets Rules For Ministers' Treatment Of Public Servants

    Prime Minister John Key has laid down the law about the way ministers and public servants should interact, saying ministers may not always like the advice they receive, but they must listen to it carefully, respectfully and professionally. More>>

    Gordon Campbell: On The Funding Changes In Special Needs Education, And Uber

    The plan to strip out the educational support for older “special needs” children in order to meet the existing shortfall in funding for special needs in early childhood education is so miserly and relentlessly stupid as to defy belief… More>>

    SPECIAL EDUCATION (& More):

    Online Learning Plans:

    Get More From Scoop

     

    LATEST HEADLINES

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Politics
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news