Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Young and old struggle to find suitable work


Hard work getting a job: young and old struggle to find suitable work

Almost three quarters of younger workers forced to take jobs below their education level

Auckland, 27 June 2013: The latest Randstad Workmonitor shows both young and mature age workers continue to face an uphill battle finding a job, with 86% of New Zealanders saying it’s hard for older workers to find a suitable job and 80% forced to take a job below their education level.

Just under two thirds (65%) of Kiwis surveyed say it’s difficult for workers aged under 25 to find a job. Nearly three quarters (73%) of New Zealanders also believe those new to the workforce are often forced to take jobs below their education level.

The Randstad Workmonitor, commissioned by recruitment & HR services specialists, Randstad, surveys over 13,000 people across 32 countries each quarter, also shows that education alone may not be enough to land many younger people their first job, with 77% of New Zealanders saying experience is a more important factor in hiring Gen Y employees than education.

And in a worrying sign for the local job market, New Zealand’s younger workforce is increasingly willing to look elsewhere for employment opportunities; with 42% saying they would look overseas for a suitable job if one wasn’t available in New Zealand. This figure is relatively on par with other surveyed nations, with 43% of young employees in the USA and Germany, 42% of Dutch employees and 32% of those in Switzerland considering roles overseas.

Paul Robinson, Randstad’s New Zealand Director, says it’s important for New Zealand to remain a viable option for employees of all ages.

“The recent data has shown some worrying trends for New Zealand employers. Ensuring New Zealand remains an attractive option for the best young and mature aged talent is going to be of paramount importance for employers.

“Investing in young talent, and embracing knowledgeable mature age workers, should be a core focus for employers. Those businesses that fail to do so may find themselves losing skilled staff which may hinder the future growth of their business.

“Having a blended workforce which combines younger employees with more experienced and knowledgeable talent puts an organisation in a strong position and allows that business to benefit from a range of experiences and ideas.

“We’re entering an interesting phase, whereby there will be four generations in the workforce at one time and it is important for companies to ensure they are attractive to a range of age groups through a diverse recruitment strategy.”

Many Kiwis see the benefits of hiring a diverse range of age groups, with 57% saying the active hiring of workers over the age of 55 would benefit their business, while 69% see the value in actively hiring younger employees.

Paul Robinson says the youth unemployment rate is concerning, and is still far higher than the global average and almost three times more than the national rate. This shows that organisations could be doing more to promote diverse hiring strategies.

“While there are opportunities available for businesses willing to invest in training workers that are new to the workforce, organisations need to remain focussed on motivating people across all age brackets.

“Retaining younger staff requires employers to recognise and meet their needs by offering strong career development opportunities and training and development programs. For mature age workers, being offered flexible working arrangements could be an effective way to attract or retain their skills in the business,” says Robinson.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Gordon Campbell: On The EU’s Beef With Google

There’s every indication that Google would be on a losing wicket if it chooses to fight the European Union competition watchdogs, who have just levied a $3.3 billion fine on the firm – with the prospect of worse to come if Google doesn’t quickly change the anti-competitive practices at the heart of a court battle that’s been seven years in the making.

Essentially, the case involved Google’s alleged abuse of the stranglehold it enjoys on the online advertising associated with its search activities. More>>

 
 

Legislation: Point England Housing Bill Passed

The passage of the Point England Development Enabling Bill through Parliament this evening will benefit Auckland with additional housing, help resolve Ngāti Paoa’s Treaty claim and improve the local environment and recreation facilities, Building and Construction Minister Dr Nick Smith says. More>>

ALSO:

Cyberducation: Digital Curriculum Launch And Funding Package

Consultation on new digital technologies content for the New Zealand Curriculum and Te Marautanga o Aotearoa, the Māori-medium Curriculum, was launched today by Education Minister Nikki Kaye. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Press Conference: Red Socks And Secret Tapes

Prime Minister Bill English began his post-cabinet press conference by explaining how well the National Party's annual conference went. He also mentioned today's announcement of changes to the EQC disaster insurance legislation and wished Emirates Team New Zealand well in the America's Cup. More>>

Max Rashbrooke: On How To Make Government More Open

International surveys, while often complimentary, have also pinpointed major weaknesses: political donations are badly regulated, for instance, and appointments to government boards frequently go to those with strong political connections. More>>

In Court: Hamilton Student's Lawsuit Over Climate Change Policy

A law student from Hamilton is preparing to challenge the Government in the High Court on Monday over what she says is a “failure” to properly address climate change. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Fallout From The Barclay Tape

This is hardly a case of cleaning out your desk and being turfed out onto the pavement. As others have pointed out, the disgraced Clutha-Southland MP will remain on the public payroll for three months until the election, and for three months afterwards. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election