Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Helping Pacific protect animals, livelihoods in disasters

4 September 2013


Helping Pacific nations protect animals and livelihoods during disasters


The World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) is working with veterinarians and Government leaders from across the Pacific this week to highlight the importance of planning for animals during disasters. Improving animal welfare by increasing the number of qualified vets and the standard of veterinary care in the region is also high on the agenda for WSPA’s CEO Mike Baker who is attending the Commonwealth Veterinarian Association’s (CVA) conference in Nandi, Fiji.

The CVA event follows a week of WSPA-led disaster preparation training in Suva for 21 officials from Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Western Samoa, Fiji, Tonga, and the Cook Islands. Attendees learnt how to implement the globally recognized Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards (LEGS) which includes instruction on simple early warning systems and well-coordinated evacuation of animals.

Every year large numbers of animals suffer and die as a result of natural disasters across the Pacific. With experts predicting more frequent severe weather events as the world’s climate changes [Climate Change Impacts in the Asia/Pacific Region, ILFAD and The Global Mechanism.], injury and loss of livestock will have a progressive impact on Pacific nations, with a majority of people relying on their animals for livelihoods and sustenance.

Helping animals during adversities ensures communities are better able to recover in the aftermath of cyclones, tsunamis and flooding common across the region. Last week’s LEGS session builds on similar training during 2012 bringing the total number of regionally accredited officials to 49.

WSPA’s Disaster Management Operations Director for Asia Pacific, Dr Ian Dacre said: “Our toughest challenges – food security and safety, disease, economic development and climate change – can only be tackled when the humane treatment of animals is a fundamental part of the solution.

“Our work to help animals starts with people. In this case we are working with local communities in island nations so they can better prepare and protect their animals from more frequent severe weather events. We are empowering people to take action and safeguard their animals – by helping animals we are also helping people too.”

In recent years WSPA has sent teams to Fiji to help animals and communities following Cyclone Tomas in 2010 and severe flooding in 2012. A team also responded to the Solomon Islands earthquake and tsunami in February this year.


WSPA is also supporting the CVA as it tackles challenges to improving animal welfare in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) including increasing the limited number of animal health services and considering the case for a veterinary school in Fiji.


Chair of the CVA Organising Committee Dr Robin Yarrow said: “Animals are a vitally important part of Pacific island life and also contribute significantly to food security and the regional economy. Increasing demand for livestock products is providing both opportunities and dilemmas; the welfare of companion animals, marine and wildlife is also important, yet we have a very limited number of veterinary professionals to care for our many diverse animals.


He added: “We need to ensure better animal protection and education because it makes sense for the animals and for the people who depend on them. We need people to understand the benefit of good animal welfare not only for their animals but for themselves as well.”


The WSPA has also recently signed an MOU with the CVA. The two organisations are dedicated to working together to improve animal welfare across the Pacific region.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

False Electoral Return: John Banks Sentenced To Community Work, Curfew

“The conviction of John Banks today is another sad chapter for John Banks and the ACT Party”, says Labour candidate for Epsom Michael Wood.

“Mr Banks was found guilty of electoral fraud in June. Regardless of what sentence is handed down, his reputation is in tatters. Sentencing is a matter for the court, and publicly deriding him further brings little benefit.”

“With the conviction confirmed, it is time for the ACT Party to step up to the mark and apologise to the people of Epsom. Mr Banks has suffered the consequences of his actions, but so far the ACT Party has gotten off scott-free” More>>

 
 

Parliament Today:

Gordon Campbell: On The Rise Of ISIS And Labour

While global attention got distracted by the fate of MH17 and the atrocities in Gaza, the world’s other mega ‘bad news’ story – the rise of ISIS-led fundamentalism in Iraq – has reached a tipping point. More>>

ALSO:

Parliament Today: Parliament Adjourns

The 50th Parliament has adjourned for the final time. After the completion of the adjournment debate, MPs left for the campaign trail with Parliament to be dissolved on August 14 ahead of the September 20 election. More>>

ALSO:

Novopayout: Government-Owned Company To Take Over School Payroll

After lengthy negotiations, the Ministry of Education and the existing school payroll provider, Talent2, have settled both on the amounts payable by Talent2 towards the costs of remediating the Novopay service and a new operating model for the school payroll system. More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Labour Will Raise Minimum Wage, Restore Work Rights

A Labour government will raise the minimum wage $2 an hour to $16.25 and restore work rights to ensure the benefits of economic growth are shared fairly by all New Zealanders, Labour Leader David Cunliffe says. More>>

ALSO:

Police: Crewe File Review Released

No new evidence has come to light implicating any specific person as being responsible for the murders of Jeannette and Harvey Crewe... The review identifies there is a distinct possibility that Exhibit 350 (the brass .22 cartridge case) may be fabricated evidence, and that if this is the case, that a member of Police would have been responsible. More>>

ALSO:

Werewolf Issue #49: Gordon Campbell Interviews Laila Harre

For 25 years, Labour and National have been in virtual agreement about the basics of economic policy, and differed mainly on how to go about managing its social consequences. More>>

ALSO:

Greens: Plan To Protect Our Maui’s Dolphins

1. Protect Maui’s from being killed in the sanctuary set up to protect them... 2. Extend fishing protections to the entire Maui’s range... 3. Help protect the livelihoods of affected fishers by supporting them to adopt dolphin-safe fishing methods. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On National’s Electorate Deals

For all the talk yesterday from Prime Minister John Key about National being transparent about its electorate deals in Epsom and Ohariu, that transparency is entirely front-loaded. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news