Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

Helping Pacific protect animals, livelihoods in disasters

4 September 2013


Helping Pacific nations protect animals and livelihoods during disasters


The World Society for the Protection of Animals (WSPA) is working with veterinarians and Government leaders from across the Pacific this week to highlight the importance of planning for animals during disasters. Improving animal welfare by increasing the number of qualified vets and the standard of veterinary care in the region is also high on the agenda for WSPA’s CEO Mike Baker who is attending the Commonwealth Veterinarian Association’s (CVA) conference in Nandi, Fiji.

The CVA event follows a week of WSPA-led disaster preparation training in Suva for 21 officials from Vanuatu, Solomon Islands, Western Samoa, Fiji, Tonga, and the Cook Islands. Attendees learnt how to implement the globally recognized Livestock Emergency Guidelines and Standards (LEGS) which includes instruction on simple early warning systems and well-coordinated evacuation of animals.

Every year large numbers of animals suffer and die as a result of natural disasters across the Pacific. With experts predicting more frequent severe weather events as the world’s climate changes [Climate Change Impacts in the Asia/Pacific Region, ILFAD and The Global Mechanism.], injury and loss of livestock will have a progressive impact on Pacific nations, with a majority of people relying on their animals for livelihoods and sustenance.

Helping animals during adversities ensures communities are better able to recover in the aftermath of cyclones, tsunamis and flooding common across the region. Last week’s LEGS session builds on similar training during 2012 bringing the total number of regionally accredited officials to 49.

WSPA’s Disaster Management Operations Director for Asia Pacific, Dr Ian Dacre said: “Our toughest challenges – food security and safety, disease, economic development and climate change – can only be tackled when the humane treatment of animals is a fundamental part of the solution.

“Our work to help animals starts with people. In this case we are working with local communities in island nations so they can better prepare and protect their animals from more frequent severe weather events. We are empowering people to take action and safeguard their animals – by helping animals we are also helping people too.”

In recent years WSPA has sent teams to Fiji to help animals and communities following Cyclone Tomas in 2010 and severe flooding in 2012. A team also responded to the Solomon Islands earthquake and tsunami in February this year.


WSPA is also supporting the CVA as it tackles challenges to improving animal welfare in the Pacific Island Countries and Territories (PICTs) including increasing the limited number of animal health services and considering the case for a veterinary school in Fiji.


Chair of the CVA Organising Committee Dr Robin Yarrow said: “Animals are a vitally important part of Pacific island life and also contribute significantly to food security and the regional economy. Increasing demand for livestock products is providing both opportunities and dilemmas; the welfare of companion animals, marine and wildlife is also important, yet we have a very limited number of veterinary professionals to care for our many diverse animals.


He added: “We need to ensure better animal protection and education because it makes sense for the animals and for the people who depend on them. We need people to understand the benefit of good animal welfare not only for their animals but for themselves as well.”


The WSPA has also recently signed an MOU with the CVA. The two organisations are dedicated to working together to improve animal welfare across the Pacific region.


ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Not Easy: Gordon Campbell On The Greens’ Ongoing Problems

Hard to treat the Greens’ belated decision to stand a candidate in Ohariu as being anything other than a desperation move, by a party whose own leadership is evidently concerned about its chances of survival...

A few months ago, the Greens felt able to forego that role in Ohariu in order to help a beleaguered Labour Party get its candidate Greg O’Connor across the line, and knock Peter Dunne out of the parliamentary frame. More>>

 

Closing The Gap: Ardern Rules Out Income Tax Rise

After earlier commitments by Jacinda Ardern to do something about inequality and poverty, this new position on income tax seems an about face. To do something significant about inequality requires increases in income for those at the bottom and decreases for those at the top... More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On DHB Deficits And Free Trade

Currently the world is looking on aghast at the Trump administration’s plans to slash Obamacare, mainly in order to finance massive tax changes that will deliver most of their gains to the wealthy. Lives will be lost in the trade-off. Millions of Americans stand to lose access to the healthcare they need... More>>

Greens' Response: Slum-Like Rentals Exposed In Renting Review

“...The grim findings of the review are a wakeup call about the true state of rentals in this country. Too many renters are festering in slum-like conditions under the thumb of landlords who have largely unchecked powers and ignore tenants’ complaints when it suits them.” More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On The Life And Times Of Peter Dunne

The unkind might talk of sinking ships, others could be more reminded of a loaded revolver left on the desk by his Cabinet colleagues as they closed the door behind them, now that the polls in Ohariu had confirmed he was no longer of much use to National. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Labour’s Campaign Launch

One of the key motifs of Ardern’s speech was her repeated use of the phrase – “Now, what?” Cleverly, that looks like being Labour’s response to National’s ‘steady as it goes’ warning against not putting the economic ‘gains’ at risk. More>>

ALSO:

Lyndon Hood: Social Welfare, Explained

Speaking as someone who has seen better times and nowadays mostly operates by being really annoying and humiliating to deal with, I have some fellow feeling with the current system, so I’ll take this chance to set a few things straight.. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

Featured InfoPages

Opening the Election