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The right to know: Gerry Brownlee

The right to know: Gerry Brownlee

Posted by Clare Curran on October 15th, 2013

This is the final instalment in the ministerial profiles as part of  The Right to Know series, in which the adequacy of Ministers responses to Official Information Act requests are put under scrutiny.

And we saved, if not the best, one of the worst, till last. Hon Gerry Brownlee, Leader of the House, Minister of Transport, Minister for Canterbury Earthquake Recovery and Minister Responsible for the Earthquake Commission responded to our request to all Ministers asking for the number of OIA requests received between 1 January 2012 and 1 January 2013 with a fairly upfront account.

The redacted spread sheet included in his response allowed my team and I to distil some interesting conclusions. But there are a few caveats. The number of requests responded to after the 20 workings day time limit does not include extended requests as noted in the log. We have treated requests equally if they were late by two days or two months for the purposes of graphing, if you want specific lengths of time please do go and look at the original document.

You’ll also note we haven’t bothered to graph the requestors here although we do give Gerry credit for including some information about these in his spread sheet. We deemed it pointless to try to analyse these due to the lack of differentiation between MPs from political parties which would have made the data highly inaccurate.

So, have a look for yourselves: Feel free to offer rankings/make comparisons in the comments now we have profiled all the Ministers.

Read the rest of this post here

http://blog.labour.org.nz/2013/10/15/the-right-to-know-gerry-brownlee/

ENDS

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