Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 

UNICEF NZ Statement on Child Poverty Monitor

UNICEF NZ Statement on Child Poverty Monitor, Released Today by OCC

The inaugural Child Poverty Monitor, released today (Monday, 9 December) by the Office of the Children’s Commissioner (OCC), JR McKenzie Trust and the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service at Otago University, contains some deeply concerning figures. However, it is an important step forward for tracking how well New Zealand is doing in giving children the standard of living they need.

Deborah Morris-Travers, UNICEF New Zealand Advocacy Manager, said, “It’s of significant concern that 10% of Kiwi Kids – twice the rate of the New Zealand population as a whole – are living in severe poverty.

“These children are living in homes with low incomes and suffer material hardship that means they go without basic things like fruit and vegetables and a warm house. They are more susceptible to the respiratory illness and skin diseases reported on in the technical report behind the Child Poverty Monitor.

“Sadly, some of these children will also go without visits to the doctors and the medicines they need, until they are so ill they require hospitalisation. In the period 2008-2012 there were 40,050 hospital admissions for conditions associated with socio-economic status.

“We are also concerned that some groups of children are disproportionately represented in poverty statistics, with young, Māori and Pasifika children in important developmental stages, more likely to be in poverty than others. The Monitor shows that babies between 29 days and 1 year old are especially vulnerable to the infectious diseases of poverty.



“The Monitor tells us that 159,000 children (60% of those in poverty) are living in poverty for long periods of time. Living in persistent poverty will undermine a child’s physical, mental, emotional and social wellbeing with the potential for long-term damage.

“While the figures released today are very worrying, there are improvements in the numbers of children reliant on benefits. There are also signs of reductions in injury rates and hospitalisations for maltreatment. While caution is needed with these figures, any reduction in hospitalisations is positive and we would hope to see this maintained.

“The Child Poverty Monitor itself is a welcome initiative because annual monitoring of income poverty, material hardship, severe poverty and persistent poverty, means we’ll have a good understanding of whether government policies and community responses are improving the lives of these vulnerable children. Data is critical for government to develop policy and initiatives that will address disparities.

“The partnership between the Office of the Children’s Commissioner, JR McKenzie Trust and the NZ Child and Youth Epidemiology Service at Otago University, highlights that people in a range of sectors are concerned about children living in poverty. It also demonstrates what can be achieved when people work together in the interests of children.

“As a signatory to the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child, New Zealand is obliged to ensure that all children have a standard of living that supports their development. The Child Poverty Monitor reinforces our view that efforts to implement the Convention have been patchy and slow, as highlighted in UNICEF New Zealand’s Kids Missing Out report released last week.

“We hope the Child Poverty Monitor will add impetus to current efforts to address the urgent issue of children in poverty and assist all New Zealanders in their understanding of why families with children must be a national priority for investment and support.”

- ENDS -

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

SCOOP COVERAGE: CHRISTCHURCH MOSQUES TERROR ATTACK


'Public Safety': Next Firearms Reform Plan Announced

The next Arms Amendment Bill will:

• Establish a register of firearms and licence holders to be rolled out over 5 years
• Tighten the rules to get and keep a firearms licence
• Tighten the rules for gun dealers to get and keep a licence
• Require licences to be renewed every five years
• Introduce a new system of warning flags so Police can intervene and seek improvement if they have concerns about a licence holder’s behaviour
• Prohibit visitors to New Zealand from buying a gun... More>>

 

Gordon Campbell: On Being Australia's Pacific Go-Fers

Inevitably, there was an aspect of ‘what might have been’ about the weekend’s meeting in Canberra between PM Jacinda Ardern and her Australian counterpart, Scott Morrison... More>>

ALSO:

RNZ: Trades Hall Bombing Case Re-Opened, Evidence Released

The cold case has been reopened and the police have recently revealed more details about the bomb's components - including that it was wrapped in a 1977 edition of The Evening Post. More>>

Safety: Govt Targets Fewer Deaths On The Road

“Most roads deaths and serious injuries are preventable and too many New Zealanders have lost their lives or been seriously injured in crashes that could have been prevented by road safety upgrades,” said Associate Transport Minister Julie Anne Genter. More>>

ALSO:

Pay Rise Delay: Teachers Unions Plan Legal Action Against Novopay

Both of the teachers unions - NZEI and the PPTA - have confirmed they will be taking legal action against Novopay. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On What’s Wrong With Wellington

For many Wellingtonians, it hasn’t been the normal hardships – the workings of central government and the lousy weather – that have recently pushed their tolerance into the red zone. It has been the inability of local government to maintain even the basics. More>>

ALSO:

Emission Statement: 'Consensus Reached' On Agriculture

Today the Government launched a consultation document, informed by the work of the Interim Climate Change Committee (ICCC), on how to bring agriculture into the emissions trading scheme, a key part of the Government’s plan to tackle climate change and reduce New Zealand’s emissions. More>>

ALSO:

 
 
 
 
 

LATEST HEADLINES

  • PARLIAMENT
  • POLITICS
  • REGIONAL
 
 

InfoPages News Channels