Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


409 Objections to Proposed Electorate Boundaries

MEDIA RELEASE

Tuesday 14 January 2014
Representation Commission
Te Komihana Whakatau Rohe Pōti

409 Objections to Proposed Electorate Boundaries

The Representation Commission has received 409 objections to proposed electorate boundaries for the next two general elections.   Over 1,700 people have contributed through individual, form submissions and petitions.

“Objections include suggestions for electorate name changes and changes to boundaries to reflect their communities of interest.  Some objectors want to see the existing electorate boundaries retained,” says Bernard Kendall, Chair of the Representation Commission.

“A summary of the objections is now available for people to make counter-objections,” says Mr Kendall.

People have until 5:00pm, Wednesday 29 January to make counter-objections.  Counter-objections can be made online atwww.elections.org.nz, or sent by post, email or fax.  The Commission will take the counter-objections into account when deciding the final boundaries. 

A summary of the objections can be viewed online at www.elections.org.nz/events/electorate-boundary-review/objections-proposed-boundaries or printed copies can be viewed at libraries, Registrar of Electors’ offices, Council offices or Council service centres, Te Puni Kōkiri regional offices, Māori Land Court offices and Rūnanga offices.

Electorates that have generated the most comment include:
•          Mt Roskill with 128 objections including two form submissions from 600 people and one petition with 38 signatures.  The majority of objections oppose an area within the existing Epsom electorate moving into the Mt Roskill electorate.
•          Maungakiekie with 24 objections mainly opposed to the proposed boundary with the Tāmaki electorate around Stonefields.
•          Helensville with 37 objections most of which oppose the geographic size of the electorate and the wide range of communities to be represented.
•          Mt Albert with 17 objections opposed to the splitting of Grey Lynn from Auckland Central.
•          Kelston with 16 objections mainly opposed to the inclusion of the Te Atatu South area in the Kelston electorate rather than the Te Atatū electorate.  There are also objections about the inclusion of Waterview in Kelston.
•          New Lynn with six objections including two petitions with over 180 signatures, opposed to the transfer of population from Mt Roskill to New Lynn and changes that split the New Lynn community.
•          Taranaki-King Country with 25 objections mainly opposed to the inclusion of Temple View, which is currently in the Hamilton West electorate.
•          Port Hills with 19 objections including one petition with over 60 signatures, opposed to the Halswell area moving from the existing Selwyn electorate into the Port Hills electorate.  A number of objectors suggested it should be named ‘Banks Peninsula’.
•          Christchurch Central with 15 objections including a petition with over 20 signatures, opposed to the northern boundary with the Waimakariri electorate.  A number of objectors suggest it should be named ‘Avon’ or ‘Ōtākaro’.
•          Christchurch East with 11 objections including one petition with over 200 signatures, opposed to the inclusion of the Bromley area in the Port Hills electorate.  There are also objections to the proposal to move Mairehau and part of St Albans from Christchurch Central to Christchurch East. 
•          Selwyn with 10 objections including one petition with 180 signatures, opposed to the communities of Hornby, Islington and Hei Hei moving into Selwyn from Wigram and two objections about Rakaia moving into Selwyn from Rangitata.

409 objections compares with 331 objections received when the boundaries were last redrawn in 2007.

The Representation Commission plans to hold public hearings between 10 and 19 February.  The final boundaries will be released on 17 April.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

PARLIAMENT TODAY:

Gordon Campbell: On The Economic Bad News (And Turkey’s Fears About The Kurds)

Traditionally, voters regard National as a more competent manager of the economy. It is the sole upside of crony capitalism: surely these guys must know what their mates in business want and need. These last few months though, have put that faith sorely to the test... More>>

ALSO:

Discussion Document: Fresh Look At Family Violence Laws

A discussion document launched today takes a hard look at the way the law prevents and responds to family violence, and proposes a comprehensive rethink to strengthen New Zealand’s legislative response. More>>

ALSO:

PM's Presser: ‘Precarious’ Solid Energy In Banks’ Hands

Liquidation of state-owned coal company Solid Energy “cannot be ruled out” but is “not the number one preferred option of the government,” says Prime Minister John Key, who confirmed the beleaguered company was discussed today at Cabinet as its banking syndicate grapples with its commercially dire prospects. More>>

ALSO:

Missed Opportunities: Amnesty International Report Card On NZ's UN Role

As New Zealand steps down from its month as President of the Council, Amnesty International has taken the opportunity to review New Zealand’s role on the Council so far and assess their performance and contribution to protecting human rights worldwide. More>>

ALSO:

Prince Charles Get More Jobs: PM Announces Honorary Military Appointments

PM John Key has announced that Her Majesty The Queen has approved the appointment of HRH The Prince of Wales to three honorary positions: Admiral of the Fleet of the Royal New Zealand Navy; Field Marshal, New Zealand Army; Marshal of the Royal New Zealand Air Force. More>>

ALSO:

No TPP Deal: Gordon Campbell On Why We Should Still Oppose Investor-State Dispute Measures

Even in this dark hour for the TPP, the secrecy farce continues... What is left to hide? Every single negotiator went into those talks in Maui knowing exactly where everyone else stood. More>>

REACTION:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news