Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


NZ faces an energy skills crisis

Employers in New Zealand’s energy industry are recruiting from overseas or outside the industry in order to overcome the domestic skills shortage, says recruiting experts Hays.

According to the recruiter the shortage of energy professionals is evident across New Zealand, but is most acute in rural regions where there is less of a skills base and where overseas candidates are often unwilling to move.

“Employers are not increasing the overall size of their existing workforce, but the ongoing skills shortage means that they are constantly recruiting to replace staff who leave for work in other locations or who retire,” says Jason Walker, Managing Director of Hays in New Zealand.

“A number of New Zealander's have returned home from Australia where energy jobs are not as prevalent, and this has helped to a point, but employers still face a skills shortage when they recruit.

“As a result, they are now considering hiring from overseas markets, such as the Philippines, and employing mechanical and electrical tradespeople from outside the energy industry who can be trained to become Line Mechanics and Power Technicians.”

According to Hays, the five skills in greatest demand but shortest supply in New Zealand’s energy sector are:

1. Glove and Barrier Line Mechanics – “Given the length of time required to qualify as a Glove and Barrier Line Mechanic, which could be up to 10 years to be fully competent, and the cost of the training for employers, there is a massive shortfall of these candidates in New Zealand,” says Jason. “Yet their skills are highly sought after both at home and abroad.”

2. Substation Design Engineers – “Very few Electrical Engineers go on to specialise as Substation Design Engineers. Consequently there is a shortage of suitable candidates. Each region of New Zealand has a need for these Engineers but the availability of relevant candidates, particularly outside the main cities, is very low.”

3. Power Technicians – “Few Electricians specialise as Power Technicians. There are other opportunities available in the construction industry and it can take up to five years post-trade qualification to qualify as a Power Technician. There are also limited opportunities to train directly on local substations and lines networks.”

4. Distribution Line Mechanics – “The lines industry is currently buoyant and there is an ongoing demand for New Zealand qualified Line Mechanics. The unique local market demands good local network knowledge, but most candidates lack such experience.”

5. Substation Project Managers – “A higher than normal programme of new build and substation refurbishments around New Zealand has created demand for experienced Project Managers. Normally companies are interested only in candidates with five or more years of experience in delivering large-scale substations, but there is a lack of candidates in this area.”

Hays, the world’s leading recruiting experts in qualified, professional and skilled people.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Bank Scandals (And Air Crashes)

Last month, the Australian Securities and Investment Commission (ASIC) filed proceedings against Westpac over activities that have some distinct echoes of the Libor scandal. More>>

Budget: Health Funding Must Keep Up With Need

NZNO: “The nursing team has been doing more with less for years. It’s getting to the point that we’re really worried about our colleagues, our patients, our jobs and the level of health care available for people in our country." More>>

ALSO:

Emissions Inventory: Time For The Government To Do The Right Thing

It’s time for the National Government to step up and do the right thing to reduce climate pollution as data shows New Zealand’s greenhouse gas emissions are higher than ever, the Green Party said today. More>>

ALSO:

Budget 2016: More Partnership Schools To Open

Seven new schools will join the eight Partnership Schools already open, along with further new schools opening in 2017. “The growth of this policy is a reflection of the high level of interest from educators and community leaders,” Mr Seymour says. More>>

ALSO:

No Correspondence With English: Did Brownlee Make Up Sale Of Navy Ships ‘On The Hoof?’

Having revealed that several Royal New Zealand Navy vessels have not left port in years, New Zealand First is now asking the Minister of Defence to prove he did not come up with the idea of selling HMNZS Taupo and Pukaki until the media asked him. More>>

Housing Plans: Labour- Abolish Auckland Urban Boundary
The Government should rule out any possibility of an urban growth boundary in Auckland Council’s Unitary Plan if it is serious about fixing the housing crisis. More>>
Greens - State House Solution
The Homes Not Cars policy allows Housing New Zealand to retain its dividend and, in addition, would refund its tax, to spend on the emergency building of around 450 new state houses. More>>

ALSO:

Houses And Taxes: Post-Cabinet, Pre-Budget Press Conference

The Prime Minister said that the pre-budget announcements showed that his Government is “investing in a growing economy”. He re-affirmed the National Government’s commitment to lowering personal tax rates but that any such change must fit with the fiscal reality of the time. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news