Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


THE NATION - Interviews with David Cunliffe, Jamie Whyte

THE NATION Transcripts - Interviews with David Cunliffe, Jamie Whyte


From Patrick Gower’s interview with David Cunliffe:

• Cunliffe admits error in attacking John Key for being “out of touch” because he’s rich and lives in a “leafy suburb.” “Look if I had my time again Paddy, honestly that would not be a line I would use. So fair cop, I learned from that… We’ve [Key and Cunliffe] both done bloody well and we both started from humble beginnings.”
• Saying he lives “a reasonably middle class existence” when he and his wife are both in the top two percent of earners “probably not my best line”, Cunliffe says for first time he took “a big pay cut” when he went into parliament.
Gower: “You’re rich yourself aren’t you?”
Cunliffe: “I think we’ve done well.”
• Cunliffe refuses to guarantee the Greens’ place in Labour-led government – “that depends on how the voters decide.”
• Withdraws promise by previous Labour leader David Shearer that Greens will get a proportionate share of Cabinet seats – “we’re different roosters, I’m not doing it that way” – and won’t discuss coalition deals before election.
• Cunliffe says Labour will look to buy back partially sold power companies “as soon as affordable.”
“We’ll look for some open market opportunities [to buy back assets] as they come and we will look to strengthen the crown’s net asset backing.”
• Doesn’t accept raising the age of Super to 67 is a dead policy, despite bottom-line opposition from New Zealand First and National.
• “I know I haven’t done everything right and I’m learning.”
• “The polls aren’t really what we would like them to be.”

From Simon Shepherd’s interview with Jamie Whyte:

• ACT leader says “yes” it’s logical that his support for legal incest means he’d also support legal polygamy, but it’s not ACT policy, and admits he was “a silly thing to do” to “get drawn in” to a “philosophical discussion” about incest.
• ACT to promote extending three strikes legislation to burglary.
Whyte suggests third strike could mean life imprisonment, but struggles to answer questions about how the policy would work.
“On this policy, we haven’t yet worked out the tariffs we would be in favour of for the crime but there will be a three strike policy”, and Whyte is happy for increased government spending to pay for it.

• Denies it’s a return to Rodney Hide-style populism: “being tough on crime is completely consistent with the free market, liberal kind of ideas of the ACT party.”
• Believes ACT can win Epsom by itself and doesn’t need a deal with National: “We haven’t met, we’ve had no explicit discussion about it because I don’t think a deal is required… there’s no need for us to do an explicit deal.”
• Whyte isn’t sure whether New Zealand government should own conservation estate: “On the whole we believe that conservation is best done by private ownership.”
• Whyte wouldn’t have voted against GCSB bill, unlike predecessor John Banks, and hopes he wouldn’t have buckled under pressure.
• Says when people think of ACT, “…a handful probably remember the original ideas when we got going and you’re right they probably think about the various scandals.”
• Whyte says “I laugh a little” when asked for his impression of potential coalition partner Colin Craig and despite past partnership believes Maori Party will be reluctant to work with ACT now, raising questions about future coalitions.

The Nation, 9.30-10.30am Saturdays on TV3, repeated Sunday 10:10am and available on demand. Supported by NZ On Air’s Platinum Fund.

www.3news.co.nz/TheNation

- ends -


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

 

Parliament Today:

Werewolf: The Defence Pretence

Last year, the world began spending more money on weapons again, for the first time since 2011... New Zealand belongs to a region – Asia and Oceania – where military spending rose sharply in 2015, by 5.4 per cent. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Not Crying Foul, Argentina

So a couple of guys found to be criminally liable of environmental pollution in Argentina lodge an application with the Overseas Investment Office… in order to buy some prime New Zealand rural land. Seems that their factory back home had carelessly and/or intentionally discharged toxic waste into the Lujan river. Bummer... More>>

ALSO:

Urban & Rural: $303m To Merge And Modernise New Zealand’s Fire Services

Internal Affairs Minister Peter Dunne today announced funding of $303 million over five years to combine urban and rural fire services into one organisation from mid-2017. More>>

ALSO:

High Trust Regime: What Did The PM Tell His Lawyer About Foreign Trusts?

The Government stopped the IRD from reviewing New Zealand foreign trusts shortly after the Prime Minister’s lawyer wrote to the Revenue Minister claiming John Key had promised him the regime would not be changed. More>>

ALSO:

Road Crime: Wicked Campers Vans Classified As Objectionable

The definition of publication includes any "thing that has printed or impressed upon it, or otherwise shown upon it, 1 or more (or a combination of 1 or more) images, representations, signs, statements, or words", The Classification Office has previously classified such 'things' as billboards, t-shirts, and even a drink can. This is the first time the Classification Office has classified a vehicle. More>>

ALSO:

'When New' Repairs: Landmark EQC Settlement

The Earthquake Commission has cut a deal with 98 Canterbury homeowners that affirms the government entity's responsibility to repair earthquake-damaged property to a 'when new' state, as well as covering repairs for undamaged parts of a property and clarifying its position on cash settlement calculations. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Kiwirail’s Latest Stint In The Dogbox

The denigration of Kiwirail continues. The latest review (based on a 2014 assessment) of the options facing the company have enabled Kiwirail to be hung out to dry once again as a liability and burden on the taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Royal Society Report: Good Opportunities To Act Now On Climate Change

There are many actions New Zealand can and should take now to reduce the threat of climate change and transition to a low-carbon economy, a report released today by the Royal Society of New Zealand finds... More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news