Gordon Campbell | Parliament TV | Parliament Today | News Video | Crime | Employers | Housing | Immigration | Legal | Local Govt. | Maori | Welfare | Unions | Youth | Search

 


Forest & Bird alarmed at second sea lion death

Forest & Bird alarmed at second sea lion death


Independent conservation organisation Forest & Bird is calling for the squid fishing industry to use more sustainable methods after the death of a second endangered New Zealand sea lion in a fishing net in the first five weeks of the squid fishing season.

The death of the first sea lion this season in the Sub-Antarctic waters south of New Zealand was reported on 7 February and news of the second death was announced on 28 February.

New Zealand sea lions are one of the world’s rarest sea lions, and their population is declining.

Forest & Bird Marine Conservation Advocate Katrina Goddard says the squid fishing industry could switch to more sustainable fishing methods. “If the companies want to continue fishing in the same Sub-Antarctic waters where the sea lions feed, a better method is jigging – which uses hooks.

“Sea lions can be trapped in the large squid fishing nets, and it is difficult for some to escape from the nets through sea lion exclusion devices (SLEDs). The ongoing concerns with SLEDS means we don’t know how many sea lion deaths go unnoticed,” she says.
Forest & Bird has learnt that fewer sea lion pups were born in the Sub-Antarctic Auckland Islands this year but the Minister of Conservation has refused to release the figures. “We would like sea lion numbers to grow, and it is critical that the squid fishing industry does not cause any more deaths.

“The two deaths are especially alarming because they were both females. They are likely to have a dependent pup on shore and be pregnant so three lives are lost each time,” says Katrina Goddard.

ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Parliament Headlines | Politics Headlines | Regional Headlines

Election Day: Make Sure You're A Part Of It!

Saturday 20 September, is election day, and New Zealanders’ last chance to have a say on who leads the country for the next three years.

“The people and parties we elect tomorrow will be making the decisions that affect us, our families and our communities,” says Robert Peden, Chief Electoral Officer. “It doesn’t get much more important than that, and we need all New Zealanders to use their voice and vote.”

Voting places will be open from 9.00am until 7.00pm on election day. The busiest time at voting places is usually 9.00am - 11.00am.

“Take your EasyVote card with you when you go to vote, as it will make voting faster and easier, and vote close to home if you can. But don’t worry if you forget your card, or didn’t receive one, because as long as you are enrolled to vote, your voice will be heard,” says Mr Peden. More>>

 

Get More From Scoop

 

LATEST HEADLINES

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Politics
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news